Flyers happy with 'gutsy effort' vs. Red Wings

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Flyers happy with 'gutsy effort' vs. Red Wings

DETROIT -- They were behind 3-2 going into the third period.

Yet the Flyers had a good feeling about how things were going to turn out for them.

It did with a 6-3 comeback win over the Red Wings at The Joe (see story).

“It was a big, gutsy effort,” Scott Hartnell said. “In the dressing room there was a calm confidence that we knew we were going to go out there and do it. Get a couple of power plays if we kept moving our feet like we had.

“Our power play was the difference tonight and our penalty kill was great, too.”

Flyers coach Craig Berube said a few things between periods. He had to. The Flyers came into this game having just one victory at Joe Louis Arena since 1988.

“I wasn’t even born back then,” Sean Couturier quipped.

So what did Berube say?

“I told them to stay out of the penalty box,” Berube said. “I liked our game. We were playing a good game. You can’t go to the box four or five times in a period. And give them five-on-threes. You’re going to be in trouble.”

Incredibly, the Flyers won even though they gave Detroit -- which was without Henrik Zetterberg, Todd Bertuzzi, Pavel Datsyuk and Danny DeKeyser -- seven power plays.

“It’s tough. You’re putting yourself in a bad spot, but our guys did a great job killing penalties,” Berube said.

Back to the feeling in the room after two periods.

The Flyers felt Zac Rinaldo’s stick call was “unlucky” because a player fell over a stick but he was jabbing away trying to get a puck when it happened, too, and the official will always make that call.

Berube was angry because it gave the Wings a five-on-three and felt the call could have gone the other way. Detroit scored on that call to make it a 3-1 game in the second period.

“Some of the calls were unlucky like Rinaldo’s where [the player] stepped on the stick,” Claude Giroux said. “There are some penalties we have to watch out. We did a good job killing the penalties.”

This was the first time the Flyers won a game when they trailed going into the third period. They were 0-9-0.

“It’s good for our confidence,” Couturier said. “We finally believe in ourselves. That is what maybe made the difference tonight.”

A number of players said they felt they were going to win when they stepped onto the ice in the third period.

“When we scored that power-play goal [from Giroux] to tie it up, that was big,” Couturier said. “The power play hasn’t been our best asset this year but tonight it was a big part of our success.”

The Flyers' three power-play goals were a season-high.

Playoff picture
The Flyers and Rangers each have 28 points but the Rangers still hold the third spot (playoff position) in the Metropolitan Division because they have more wins (14) than the Flyers (13). Still, the fact remains the Flyers have climbed into a virtual tie for a playoff spot. No one thought that possible with their 1-7 start back in October when they were eighth in the division and dead last in the Eastern Conference.

Loose pucks
Team Canada GM Steve Yzerman scouted the game and said Claude Giroux would be evaluated on the merit of his career and not just this season. He also said Steven Stamkos intends to play in the Olympics and is progressing nicely. ... Weird seeing Chris Chelios and Ron Hextall chatting before the game in the press box. Guess Hexy wasn't in attack mode, eh? ... The Flyers are off today and practice Friday - if they can get to facility. Ice storms threaten Dallas over next two days

AHL allowing players on minor-league deals to go to Olympics

AHL allowing players on minor-league deals to go to Olympics

Players on American Hockey League contracts will be eligible to play in the 2018 Winter Olympics.

President and CEO David Andrews confirmed through a league spokesman Wednesday that teams were informed they could loan players on AHL contracts to national teams for the purposes of participating in the Pyeongchang Olympics.

The AHL sent a memo to its 30 clubs saying players could only be loaned for Olympic participation from Feb. 5-26.

The Olympic men's hockey tournament runs from Feb. 9-25. Like the NHL, which is not having its players participate for the first time since 1994, the AHL does not have an Olympic break in its schedule.

The AHL's decision does not affect players assigned to that league on NHL one- or two-way contracts. No final decision has been made about those players.

NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly denied a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation report that the league had told its 31 teams that AHL players could be loaned to play in the Olympics. It was an AHL memo sent at the direction of that league's board of governors.

When the NHL announced in April that it wouldn't be sending players to South Korea after participating in five consecutive Olympics, Andrews said the AHL was prepared for Canada, the United States and other national federations to request players.

"I would guess we're going to lose a fair number of players," Andrews said in April. "Not just to Canada and the U.S., but we're going to lose some players to other teams, as well. But we're used to that. Every team in our league has usually got two or three guys who are on recalls to the NHL, so it's not going to really change our competitive integrity or anything else."

The U.S. and Canada are expected to rely heavily on players in European professional leagues and college and major junior hockey to fill out Olympic rosters without NHL players.

With AHL experience, Flyers prospect Nicolas Aube-Kubel out to score again

With AHL experience, Flyers prospect Nicolas Aube-Kubel out to score again

VOORHEES, N.J. — At the junior level, scoring was second nature to Nicolas Aube-Kubel, like riding a bike after you figure out the balance aspect.

Goals came in bunches and points piled up — that was his game and it came effortlessly at times, especially over his final two seasons with the QMJHL's Val-d'Or Foreurs, posting back-to-back campaigns of 38 markers and 80-plus assists.

"Usually in junior, scoring was always coming naturally to me, having points and goals," he said last week at Flyers development camp.

On the AHL ice last season, it was a whole new ballgame. For Aube-Kubel, Year 1 of pro hockey was a feeling-out process from start to finish. His prolific scoring didn't carry over much at all, as the speedy 5-foot-11 winger finished with nine goals and nine assists in 71 regular-season games for Lehigh Valley.

"Guys are better with the puck," he said of the AHL. "I've always been strong on the ice and skating-wise, too, but translating to the AHL, guys are faster, guys are quicker with the puck and less turnovers."

This was part of toeing the waters in a new surrounding. Not many prospects jump from the junior ranks to the AHL without missing a beat. Aube-Kubel, who turned 21 in May, wanted to fulfill his role and duties first before worrying about scoring. He finished the season as a plus-10, tied for fourth best on the team and tops among Phantoms with 70 or more games played.

"I've always been an offensive player," Aube-Kubel said. "From being my first year in the pros, I was trying more to focus on details and what the coach was telling me. I'm excited for next year and I'll try to step up my game, for sure, and try to do what I was doing in junior."

Following his fourth development camp, Aube-Kubel finds himself heading into an interesting second season with Lehigh Valley. A lot has changed since he was taken by the Flyers in the second round of the 2014 draft. With time, the organization has significantly built up its prospect pool and added depth at forward. 

Aube-Kubel is just fine with that.

"Since I've been drafted, there was depth," he said. "Any way I'm going to play in the NHL, I'm going to make my own spot. No one is going to give it to you. If there are more drafted players, it doesn't change anything."

He's also enjoyed working with the Phantoms' staff, led by head coach Scott Gordon. More development off the ice and a greater workload during games should help moving forward.

"I liked it. They treat you like a pro," he said. "Everyone does their own thing. If you cheat or if you're not serious about it, it's you to pay off. If you're not serious, it's going to be you that gets penalized."

If Aube-Kubel needs any comfort in the quiet start to his pro career, he can look back at his first season of junior play. He tallied just 10 goals and 27 points in 64 regular-season games. Then he jumped to 53 points (22 goals, 31 assists) in 65 games in 2013-14 before scoring at will over his third and fourth seasons with Val-d'Or.

Maybe easing his way in is just part of his hockey DNA.

If so, keep an eye on Aube-Kubel next season.

"This year, I was maybe more focusing on having a role and trying to do what the coach was asking of me," Aube-Kubel said. "Now that it's all set, I'm going to focus on offensive play. I don't want to put pressure on myself, but last year wasn't my best offensive year. It was also my first year. I think I was trying to learn a lot of it and we'll see what happens next year."