Flyers-Hurricanes: 5 things you need to know

flyers-hurricanes-matchup.jpg

Flyers-Hurricanes: 5 things you need to know

Two struggling Metropolitan Division clubs will hit the ice on Tuesday night.

The Flyers (4-9-0) will look to carry over momentum gained in a 1-0 win over the New Jersey Devils when they take on the depleted Carolina Hurricanes (2-6-2) for the second time this season.

The puck will drop at PNC Arena in Raleigh, N.C. at 7:30 p.m. (CSN). Here are five things you need to know for the contest:

1. Welcome back, Vinny
After missing one game because of a facial injury suffered in a fight with Washington’s Steve Oleksy on Friday, Vinny Lecavalier will return to the Flyers’ lineup against Carolina (see story).

The Flyers’ big offseason acquisition practiced on Claude Giroux’s line with Scott Hartnell on Monday. Lecavalier denied reports that he had a broken jaw, but did still have some swelling on the left side of his face.

In order to protect himself, Lecavalier will wear a helmet with a half-shield, half-cage. He tried using a bubble shield, but quickly switched to a different bucket.

“I wanted to try both,” he said. “I was happy I started off with the cage because I felt a lot better with the thing [Sidney] Crosby wore last year -- the little protective thing. It fogs up a little bit, but I had better vision with the second one.”

Lecavalier, who missed three games earlier this season with a lower-body injury and four overall through the first 13 games, leads the Flyers with five goals and is tied with Brayden Schenn for the team lead in points with seven. Steve Downie, who is out indefinitely with a concussion, also has seven points but he recorded all of them as a member of the Colorado Avalanche.

2. Eye of the storm
It’s been a rough couple of weeks for the Hurricanes. Carolina enters Tuesday with a five-game losing streak and has several key players sidelined with injuries.

Leading-scorer Jeff Skinner -- nine points in 10 games -- is out with an upper-body injury and missed practice Monday to seek a second opinion on whatever is bothering him. The Hurricanes haven’t clarified exactly what the 21-year-old’s injury is, but he has had concussion problems in the past.

To make matters worse, both of Carolina’s netminders are on injured reserve with lower-body ailments. Starter Cam Ward isn’t skating yet and backup Anton Khudobin, who stopped 17 of 18 shots in the Hurricanes’ win over the Flyers earlier this season, is progressing slowly.

Radek Dvorak (lower body) skated with the ‘Canes on Monday and could be activated from IR to play against the Flyers. In addition, Tim Gleason and Kevin Westgarth are both listed as day-to-day with upper-body injuries and are questionable for Tuesday’s game.

Finally, former Flyer Joni Pitkanen (heel) is out for the season, leaving a big hole on Carolina’s blueline. With the exception of Downie, the Flyers will field a healthy roster.

3. Defensive carousel
The Flyers have already used all eight of their defensemen on the active roster this season, mostly because of inconsistent play on the blueline.

Head coach Craig Berube has inserted Andrej Meszaros and Erik Gustafsson in and out of the lineup a few times, but made another move on Saturday. Luke Schenn was a healthy scratch and Hal Gill made his official Flyers debut.

Gill, now in his 16th NHL season, played nearly 15 minutes and was aggressive in front of the Flyers’ net. Only Braydon Coburn logged more shorthanded minutes than Gill among defensemen. The Flyers allowed just 14 shots and did not register a single giveaway in the win.

At practice Monday, Berube’s defensive parings were identical to the ones used in the New Jersey game. It looks like Gill and Meszaros will remain in the lineup, leaving Gustafsson and Schenn to be scratched again.  

4. Struggling offenses
The Flyers and Hurricanes are two of six NHL clubs averaging under two goals per game in the early going.

The Flyers’ offensive struggles returned after a 5-2 win over the New York Islanders. In the three games since that victory, the orange and black have netted just three markers. In addition, their 21 goals are an NHL-low.

Carolina has only five tallies during its current losing streak. The ‘Canes have 27 goals in 14 games overall.

5. This and that
• Luke Schenn netted the Flyers’ lone goal in a 2-1 loss to Carolina on Oct. 6. Dvorak potted the game-winner for the ‘Canes.

• Steve Mason is 5-1-0 with a .941 save percentage and 1.84 goals-against average in six career starts against the Hurricanes. Ray Emery’s numbers are even better. He’s gone 5-0-0 with a .977 save percentage, 0.74 goals-against average and two shutouts against Carolina.

• The Hurricanes will open a five-game homestand on Tuesday.

Flyers returning from World Cup enjoyed playoff-like atmosphere

Flyers returning from World Cup enjoyed playoff-like atmosphere

VOORHEES, N.J. – It’s as if the season began right where it left off for the handful of Flyers players that participated in the World Cup of Hockey. 

Five months removed from their first round series with Washington, the group that played in the international tournament says it was nearly identical to the tempo they saw in the NHL playoffs.

“Our division was really tight so right from the get-go you couldn’t afford to lose a game,” said Sean Couturier, who suited up for North America. “It definitely felt like playoffs, and it definitely didn’t feel like September.”

Couturier was joined by his World Cup teammate Shayne Gostisbehere, along with Team Czech Republic’s Jake Voracek and Michael Neuvirth, in their return to Voorhees for their first practice with the Flyers on Monday. Team Canada’s Claude Giroux and the Team Europe duo of Mark Streit and Pierre-Edouard Bellemare will be competing in the finals this week.

While it may have been an early exit for the first wave of Flyers who reported back, the experience of playing in a tournament with that high of intensity has left them more confident than they’ve ever felt at this time of the year, particularly for Gostisbehere. 

The Calder Trophy runner-up underwent offseason hip surgery following his 46-point season. Having missed a season two years ago because of a torn ACL, Gostisbehere is thankful for how much the World Cup prepared him for his second year. He says he feels better now than he ever has in his career after picking up four assists in the tournament.

“You don’t play in those games in September normally so it was pretty cool to do,” Gostisbehere said. “I think the tournament was a good stepping stone for me and to branch off my injury and give yourself the confidence that you’re feeling good for the year.”

Like Couturier and Gostisbehere, Voracek said the World Cup gameplay mirrored that of the NHL postseason. 

“When I look at the season for the Flyers, it was the best thing that could have happened for me,” Voracek said. “The World Cup was high level… I’m six games in before training camp even starts.”

After what he calls a “good offseason” of training, Voracek saw this opportunity as almost a saving grace – a chance to regain form before embarking on his sixth season in Philadelphia. The winger had one goal and one assist in three games that “felt like I was playing in the playoffs.”

Had this tournament occurred in 2015, the mindset coming back may have been different. Dave Hakstol was coaching his first professional season and as evidenced by their record to start the year and the comments made throughout, things took a little longer than expected when it came to picking up the new coach’s system.

That process is behind the Flyers, and it makes missing the first weekend of camp and possibly the first week of preseason games an easier obstacle to overcome.

“It’s always better when you know the system and what Hak wants in you,” Voracek said. “It’s obviously going to get better and better.”

The best-of-three World Cup finals will begin on Tuesday with the third game (if needed) commencing on Saturday. If the teams go the full distance, the remaining three Flyers involved would likely not play their first preseason game until Oct. 6 if not Oct. 8, the final exhibition game. 

Pressure is on Flyers' fourth-liner Chris VandeVelde to fend off competition

Pressure is on Flyers' fourth-liner Chris VandeVelde to fend off competition

VOORHEES, N.J. — Even before Flyers training camp opened, Ron Hextall talked about a plenitude of internal competition for jobs.
 
It’s all over the ice, too.
 
Who starts in goal: Steve Mason or Michal Neuvirth, who came on strong at the end of last season? 
 
Does Ivan Provorov win a spot on the roster? And if he does, who gets sent packing?
 
Between Scott Laughton and Nick Cousins, who gets the lion's share of ice time? 
 
Can Travis Konecny or Roman Lyubimov force a veteran forward off the team?
 
Then there’s free-agent signee Boyd Gordon, a PK specialist who was second only to Claude Giroux in the league last season on winning defensive zone draws. More competition.
 
Well, one of the key battles in training camp for both roster space and minutes concerns how veteran fourth-liner Chris VandeVelde handles the competition from Lyubimov — the 24-year-old Russian who plays a heavy game and can handle special teams — and others.
 
VandeVelde saw a bit of an offensive drop-off last season with 14 points. Though just a point fewer than the year before, the bigger dip was going from nine goals to two.
 
With no real goal-scoring additions in the offseason, Hextall is expecting bigger outputs from returning players.
 
In VandeVelde’s case, two goals is something Lyubimov could easily match or exceed.
 
“You have to go out there and give it your all,” VandeVelde said. “Hopefully, work hard and kinda make an impression. There’s a lot of guys fighting for a fair amount of spots. It’s going to be interesting.
 
“I think I’ve felt pressure every year. Obviously, you want to make an impression and get noticed out there. Reassure [them] I can still do the job and add a few things to my offensive game.”
 
And his self-evaluation?
 
“I think I was solid,” he replied. “As a fourth line, we were very good at times. Individually, I can add a little more and chip in a little more.”
 
VandeVelde is not scheduled to play in either of Monday’s split-squad games in New Jersey or Brooklyn.
 
At stake here isn’t just his job on the fourth line but the penalty kill, as well. VandeVelde’s 2:17 shorthanded ice time per game was second only to linemate Pierre-Edouard Bellemare (2:35) among the forwards.
 
The 6-foot-2, 207-pound Lyubimov has played on the penalty kill in the KHL, and Gordon is a PK specialist. What was VandeVelde’s edge is now something up for grabs, especially given both Hextall and coach Dave Hakstol have vowed there will be improvement on the PK, which ranked 14th last season after being among the bottom 10 much of the year.
 
Hakstol has said he intends to tweak the PK with some structural changes. That sounds like personnel changes and Gordon could be a guy on the fourth unit and will certainly be in the mix on the penalty kill.
 
How to make the kill better remains at large.
 
“We have to start a little more aggressively,” VandeVelde said. “Kinda like we finished last couple games there against Washington (in the playoffs). We kinda got burnt there 6-1 (in Game 3). We switched styles a little too late.”
 
The Flyers gave up five power play goals in Game 3 to the Caps.
 
VandeVelde admits his penalty kill experience gives him a bit of an edge going into camp.
 
“If I can bring that extra edge and solidify a role, that is huge,” he said.
 
VandeVelde returned to his home in Moorhead, Minn., over the summer to focus on his skating, hoping to get a more explosive start on the ice that he could utilize better during the penalty kill.
 
One thing seems certain: VandeVelde says there’s a greater comfort level for returning players as to what to expect from Hakstol. Also, whereas last year’s camp was one of implementing systems, this year’s camp is one of expanding on them.
 
“Everyone knows what to expect,” VandeVelde said. “So do all three coaches. They are going to tweak some things, whether it's penalty kill or power play or other systems. We’ll learn that. That is what preseason is for. All the players know what to expect and are ready to go.”
 
VandeVelde said he’s already been informed what the team expects from him this season. The competition could push him in that direction.
 
“I know what they want,” he said. “Obviously, I can do more offensively and want to chip in a little more as a fourth line and as an individual. Maybe just work on that.”