For Flyers, Lake Placid trip 'means a lot'

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For Flyers, Lake Placid trip 'means a lot'

LAKE PLACID, N.Y. -- Vinny Lecavalier was here once before, to watch his younger brother play.

That was certainly fun for Lecavalier and his family, but to actually take the ice at the Lake Placid Olympic Center was a far different experience -- much better than sitting in the crowd cheering on Clarkson University.

“It means a lot,” Lecavalier said. “I’m Canadian, but the hockey history obviously is a lot, coming to this arena. It’s great, it’s a beautiful town and we’re happy to bond as a team.”

It’s impossible to enter this building, and especially the actual rink on which the 1980 U.S. team surprised the world and won Olympic gold, without being hyper aware of a sense of what was accomplished here. That’s true for the many visitors who come through the Center every day on tours, but even more true of the 27 Flyers here for camp -- their coaches, too.

“It’s important for Americans and for USA hockey,” Adam Hall said. “You have milestones, that for the longest time for the Soviet Union and Canada were so dominant. To be such huge underdogs at that time in American history was something that the American people really rallied around. I think that’s why it was such a big deal.

“The World Cup of hockey in ’96, the World Juniors, you just go down the line, there’s been some great milestones in the USA hockey programs. It’s nice to see.”

Hall is one of only three Americans on the Flyers’ training camp roster -- Hal Gill and Chris VandeVelde are the others.

Even those who weren’t alive at the time of the Miracle on Ice are excited to spend time at a place so important to the growth of their sport.

“It’s pretty cool,” VandeVelde said. “There’s a lot of history here. You grew up hearing that story. You always look back at it. It’s definitely neat. I’m excited to see the town and kind of get more acquainted with it.”

While there’s business to attend to on the ice while they’re here, the Flyers aren’t just in Lake Placid to perfect coach Peter Laviolette’s systems in a historical setting. They’re here to get some time away from Philadelphia, to get to know each other better in a small town away from their friends, families and daily routines.

There are “Welcome Philadelphia Flyers” signs peppered around all over town -- at shops, restaurants and the town’s only movie theater, where the full team will take in a show Thursday night.

As Lecavalier said, they’ll be spending “basically 24 hours a day” together.

“It’s fun,” Claude Giroux said. “I’ve never been here before. We came straight [to the rink after getting off the plane], so I haven’t had time to look around. But I know we have a couple activities this weekend. I heard it’s a very nice place. I can’t wait to see it.”

The conditions at the Olympic Center aren’t exactly glamorous. The locker room in which the U.S. team dressed before their gold medal game hasn’t been updated since 1980, in fact.

But those minor inconveniences -- small locker rooms, rough ice, having to balance on rubber sheets as they walk across concrete from rink to rink -- adds to the experience of history, according to Hall.

“It’s an old building,” he said, “but you can feel a connection with the past and things that happened here.”

NHL Notes: Kings activate goalie Jonathan Quick from injured reserve

NHL Notes: Kings activate goalie Jonathan Quick from injured reserve

LOS ANGELES -- Goalie Jonathan Quick has returned to the Los Angeles Kings after injuring his groin in the first period of the season opener.

Quick led the Kings during warmups before Saturday's game against the Anaheim Ducks.

The two-time Stanley Cup winner missed 59 games with the injury, which occurred Oct. 12 against San Jose. He has been skating with the Kings for several weeks, but he didn't make any rehabilitation starts in the minors.

The Kings only announced his return by activating him from injured reserve 40 minutes before the opening faceoff.

Quick won the Conn Smythe Trophy in 2012 when the eighth-seeded Kings steamrolled the competition on their way to the franchise's first Stanley Cup title.

When healthy, Quick has been the Kings' starting goalie since December 2008.

Ducks: Vermette's 10-game suspension upheld
NEW YORK -- NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman has upheld the 10-game suspension assessed to Anaheim Ducks center Antoine Vermette.

Vermette slapped his stick against the back of linesman Shandor Alphonso's legs after losing a faceoff to Minnesota's Mikko Koivu during the third period of the Ducks' 1-0 win on Feb. 14. Vermette had a hearing with Bettman on Thursday after appealing the initial suspension.

Bettman announced Saturday that the 10-game ban would remain; Vermette has served four games already.

Vermette will lose $97,222 in salary.

The normally mild-mannered Vermette appeared to act out of frustration when Alphonso dropped the puck before the forward had put his stick in place on the ice. Officials immediately assessed a game misconduct to Vermette.

For Shayne Gostisbehere, Dave Hakstol, Stadium Series brings back cherished memories

For Shayne Gostisbehere, Dave Hakstol, Stadium Series brings back cherished memories

PITTSBURGH -- For Flyers coach Dave Hakstol and defenseman Shayne Gostisbehere, tonight’s Stadium Series game between the Flyers and Penguins brings back memories.
 
Hakstol coached North Dakota in an outdoor hockey in college, while Gostisbehere participated in one as a freshman at Union College.
 
For Hakstol, however, this whole idea of outdoor hockey began when he was growing up in central Alberta in the small town of Drayton Valley.
 
“I think everybody’s got great memories of growing up outdoors,” Hakstol said. “We had a back creek that we could shovel off. I’m sure everybody could sit back and tell you stories of playing on the outdoor rinks.
 
“For me, most recently, I’ve got two kids growing up playing on outdoor rinks, backyard rinks. It’s pretty cool. It takes you right back to the heart of the game.”
 
Hakstol’s outdoor coaching experience came during a game between Nebraska-Omaha and his North Dakota squad in 2013 at the “Mutual of Omaha Battles on Ice.”
 
“I don’t know how to describe it,” Hakstol said of the event. “It’s just a different feel. It’s an ideal scenario.”
 
He said while tonight's game is special, it’s still about the points, first and foremost.
 
“You are cognizant of everything that surrounds the event and the game,” Hakstol said. “Yet for us, it’s two points. We’re fighting for every point here. That is going to paramount.”

Gostisbehere played at Fenway Park in 2012 for Union in a game against Harvard. That night, Union won, 2-0, to become the first ECAC club to ever win outdoors.
 
“I played at Fenway Park against Harvard and it was fun,” Gostisbehere said. “That was my freshman year and the only one I ever played in.
 
“Good crowd. It wasn’t packed obviously, but it was a night game. The ice was really good. It was really cold, too. It was pretty cool.”
 
As warm as it was Friday here -- a historic 78 degrees -- temperatures will begin in the 40s tonight at Heinz Field and then drop. It rained this morning but has since ceased.
 
“The biggest thing for me was to take a second, look around,” Gostisbehere said, admitting he failed to do that in college and won’t make that mistake again.
 
“Just cherish it a little bit. You are so focused on the game, it’s tough. That was biggest thing for me. It was such a blur. Just being in college and having the opportunity to play at Fenway Park was pretty awesome.”

This will the Flyers first-ever outdoor affair in Pittsburgh.
 
“It’s pretty exciting and I’m glad to be part of it,” Gostisbehere said.