Philadelphia Flyers

Flyers Notes: Frustration shows in line brawl

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Flyers Notes: Frustration shows in line brawl

Down by a touchdown with less than 15 minutes in the game, the home team often finds itself playing with a physical edge if it wants to stay alive.

It’s something normally seen in a football game, but not so much in hockey.

The Flyers on Friday found themselves in that situation against the Capitals (see story). Joel Ward scored a hat-trick goal to put Washington up 7-0. After the faceoff, Wayne Simmonds hit Steve Oleksy and Tom Wilson. Wilson, taking exception, dropped the gloves and fought Simmonds.

As Simmonds and Wilson fought, Ray Emery skated the length of the ice in pursuit of an unwilling Braden Holtby.

"He didn’t want to fight," Emery said. "And I said, basically, ‘Protect yourself.’ He didn’t really have much of a choice."

While Holtby and Emery tangled, Brayden Schenn took on Alexander Urbom, and Vincent Lecavalier fought Oleksy. Lecavalier suffered facial injuries in his fight, and subsequently won’t be in the lineup Saturday against New Jersey.

Reasoning for this line brawl boiled down to a simple factor -- frustration.

“As a group, I think it’s a frustrating night,” Emery said. “Frustration shows sometimes that way. We all grew up playing hockey, and sometimes that happens -- you don’t want anyone to get hurt, but we don’t take losses like that.”

In addition to the fighting majors, a variety of other penalties were assessed in the brawl. Emery was assessed two minor penalties for leaving his crease and an instigator -- both served by Claude Giroux -- as well as a game misconduct. Game misconducts were also issued to Schenn, Lecavalier, Urbom and Oleksy for secondary fighting. Aaron Volpatti also picked up a 10-minute misconduct.

In all, the brawl resulted in a total of 114 penalty minutes -- 64 from the Flyers, 50 from the Capitals. The brawl alone doubled this season’s high in penalty minutes in a game for the Flyers -- the previous high being 32, set in the Oct. 5 loss to Montreal.

“It’s a hockey fight,” Giroux said. “It’s going to happen. It’s part of the game. Obviously, we were flat. It’s not the first time that’s happened during a hockey game.”

The Flyers look to rebound from Friday’s frustration Saturday when they travel to Newark, N.J. to take on the Devils. While bouncing back from a 7-0 loss is easier said than done, coach Craig Berube offered a simple solution.

“We go play a game tomorrow,” Berube said. “Pick yourself up and go play. That’s it.”

Downie’s short stay
Steve Downie didn’t even last two periods as a Flyer before he left the game, but he left the Wells Fargo Center in apparently very dramatic fashion.

According to Holmgren, Downie was taken to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania “for further tests and observation,” but according to reports, he left about half an hour after the game ended on a stretcher in an ambulance.

The Flyers declined to provide any other information.

‘Embarrassed’ response
Never mind all the debate about whether fighting belongs in hockey -- the Flyers’ general manager was OK with what occurred on the ice Friday.

Perhaps that’s putting it a bit lightly, but all things considered, Holmgren seemed at least satisfied that his team responded in some way to what transpired.

“When you get slapped around like that, it’s a response,” Holmgren said. “Do I have an issue with it? Probably not. It’s a response from an embarrassed hockey team.”

Pulling Mason
While Steve Mason did, in fact, look human in Friday’s loss, it wasn’t exactly his fault that he was pulled in the second period -- and not just because his teammates provided no support.

Berube made the decision after Mason allowed his third goal on eight shots. But his real hope was that he would send a message to the Flyers that would help redirect the course of the game.

“Just trying to get a response from our team,” Berube said.

Penalized
The 99 penalty minutes the Flyers took was the highest single-game total since March 5, 2004 against Ottawa -- the franchise record of 213.

Friday's total of 99 is the seventh-highest single-game total in Flyers history.

Last time ...
The Flyers were last shut out while allowing seven goals March 6, 2011, a 7-0 loss to the New York Rangers at Madison Square Garden.

Friday was just the ninth time in franchise history the Flyers have been shut out after allowing seven or more goals.

NHL Notes: Oilers sign star Leon Draisaitl to mega 8-year contract

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NHL Notes: Oilers sign star Leon Draisaitl to mega 8-year contract

EDMONTON, Alberta -- The Edmonton Oilers have signed center Leon Draisaitl to an eight-year contract extension with an average annual value of $8.5 million.

The extension runs through the 2024-25 season, similar to the eight-year, $100-million extension superstar captain Connor McDavid signed with the team in July.

With the signings, the Oilers are banking on McDavid and Draisaitl providing a potent one-two punch for the team as it looks to build on last season's return to the playoffs after a decade of futility.

Draisaitl, a 21-year-old German, had 77 points (29 goals, 48 assists) last season, his third in the NHL.

He finished eighth among NHL scorers, and second on the Oilers behind McDavid.

He led the Oilers in scoring during the 2017 playoffs, posting 16 points (six goals, 10 assists) in 13 games.

Draisaitl was selected third overall by the Oilers at the 2015 draft (see full story).

Avalanche: Hobey Baker winner Butcher now free agent
College hockey's top player is an NHL free agent after former University of Denver defenseman Will Butcher allowed a deadline to pass without signing with the Colorado Avalanche.

The Avalanche selected Butcher in the fifth round of the 2013 draft and had until Tuesday to sign the Hobey Baker Award winner who led Denver to a national championship in April.

A person with direct knowledge of the discussions told The Associated Press on Wednesday that Butcher already has had discussions with the Buffalo Sabres, New Jersey Devils and NHL-expansion Vegas Golden Knights. The person said Butcher has not yet narrowed his list, and is also talking with other teams.

The person spoke to the AP on the condition of anonymity because the talks are private.

The Denver Post first reported the three specific teams expressing interest in Butcher (see full story).

Wild: Cullen comes home for 21st NHL season
The Minnesota Wild and center Matt Cullen have agreed to a one-year, $1 million contract, bringing him back to his home state for a 21st season in the NHL.

The Wild announced the deal, which includes $700,000 in potential performance bonuses, on Wednesday.

Cullen played the last two years with Pittsburgh, winning consecutive Stanley Cups with the Penguins. He played three seasons for the Wild from 2010-13, his first return to Minnesota since launching his career at Moorhead High School and St. Cloud State.

Cullen, who will turn 41 on Nov. 2, had 13 goals and 18 assists in 72 games in 2016-17 for the Penguins, plus two goals and seven assists in 25 playoff games. He has played in 1,366 career regular season games, the sixth-most among active players (see full story).

ESPN analyst ranks Flyers' farm system No. 1 in NHL

ESPN analyst ranks Flyers' farm system No. 1 in NHL

Ron Hextall never told fans to "trust the process," but apparently any faith in the Flyers' GM has been vindicated.

At least that's the case if you believe ESPN NHL writer Corey Pronman's latest farm system rankings (it's an Insider story, so apologies in advance). Pronman has the Flyers' farm ranked as No. 1 in the NHL. 

"The Flyers don't have as much game-breaking talent as our No. 2 team (Coyotes) does at the top of their system," Pronman writes, "but 2017 No. 2 overall pick Nolan Patrick is right up there; after Patrick, the Flyers have the cupboards lined with talent at every position."

Pronman credits the Flyers with nailing his first-round picks (Patrick, Ivan Provorov), grabbing middle-round prospects that have blossomed (Shayne Gostisbehere, Oskar Lindblom) and specifically mentions Phil Myers, an undrafted defenseman that has become "one of the very best defense prospects in hockey."

For so long, the Flyers' organization was perpetually in "win-now mode," but the late Ed Snider hired Hextall away from the Kings and eventually made him GM, knowing that Hexy was taking a broader view of the organization. Instead of trading away young talent and draft picks for aging veterans, Hextall restocked a dreadful farm system to get the team where it is today.

"Not too long ago, the Flyers' farm system was a laughingstock, with C-grade college free agents making it into their top five," Pronman said. "Today, they are in the best position of any NHL team in terms of adding young premium players to their roster."