Flyers Notes: Hartnell avoids serious injury

hartnellusa.jpg

Flyers Notes: Hartnell avoids serious injury

It could have been a lot worse for Scott Hartnell.

This was one time when his signature “#HartnellDown” battle cry on Twitter was far more serious and nothing to joke about.

With 10 minutes left to play in Tuesday’s 2-1 Flyers win over Florida (see story), Panthers’ defenseman Erik Gudbranson ran Hartnell along the right boards.

The Flyers’ left wing fell awkwardly before crumbling to the ice, where he remained motionless for a few moments.

Gudbranson received a five-minute boarding major for the hit, and Hartnell, somehow, got up on his own power and was able to return to the ice for the Flyers’ ensuing power play.

He’s OK, he said, but he’s definitely feeling the hit.

“I was more scared than anything -- I don’t know if ‘scared’ is the right word,” Hartnell said. “But you never want to see a guy go awkwardly into the boards like that. Hasn’t happened to me in a couple years, but yeah, my shoulder’s not feeling that great, more just a little dazed or whatever.”

Schenn’s year?
Brayden Schenn’s contract expires at the end of this season. If ever there were a season for the 22-year-old to prove that he can live up to his much-talked about potential, this is it.

And so far, it seems like Schenn’s received that memo. 

Through four games, the young forward has three points -- two goals, one of which was scored in Tuesday’s win, and an assist.

Is he on his way to a breakout season?

“It’s still early,” Schenn said. “I just want to keep on contributing. Getting the opportunity to play with Vinny Lecavalier and Jake Voracek right now, you’ve got to make the most of those opportunities. That’s what I’m trying to do.”

At least by the numbers, Schenn is off to his best start. Last year, he had just two assists through his first four games and the year before, he had no points at all. In his first NHL experience in 2010-11 with the Kings, Schenn had just two assists in eight games total.

Berube’s choice
Craig Berube’s first game was a success -- a 2-1 win. It was a lot easier than Peter Laviolette’s first game as Flyers coach, which was a rather unforgettable 8-2 penalty-riddled loss to the Capitals.

Dan Carcillo took a penalty that resulted in a record nine-minute power play for the Caps, who torched the Flyers for three goals.

Now, Jay Rosehill took a four-minute double minor and received a 10-minute game misconduct in Berube’s debut that brought back memories of the Carcillo incident. The only difference is, the Flyers survived Rosehill’s.

Regarding Rosehill’s penalty, the officials gave the Flyers a choice of a four-minute, 5-on-4 penalty kill or a two-minute, 5-on-3 kill. Berube chose the 5-on-4.

“That’s kind of weird,” Berube said. “For me, I’ve never seen that before. For me, it was an obvious one -- 5-on-4. I didn’t want to kill a two-minute 5-on-3. It’s tough.”

In that situation, per the 2013-14 NHL rulebook, Table 17, Example 7, the Flyers were given the “choice to play one player short-handed for four minutes or two players short-handed for two minutes.”

The double minor for roughing was assessed as two separate minor penalties, and such results in two separate power-play opportunities. The Panthers’ power play was 0 for 5 on the game.

Machete man
That would be actor Danny Trejo, who was in attendance wearing a Flyers jersey. He’s done some films here -- “Machete” was not one of them.

Anyway, rumor was Trejo threatened to do some surgery on the Flyers if they didn’t win this one for Berube.

Trejo was accompanied by actress Alexa Vega. Both were promoting their next film, “Machete Kills,” which opens Oct. 11.

Guests
United States Army Staff SGT Paul D’Agostin, who currently serves as a Detachment SGT with the United States Army’s Striker Reserves Center in Trenton, N.J., escorted Lauren Hart on the national anthem.

Petty Officer Stanley Maculewicz is in his fifth year of service with the Navy, and just returned home from his first tour of deployment in Afghanistan.

Giroux’s Crew (Club Suite F) honored United States Army 462nd Transportation Battalion stationed out of Trenton, N.J. 

NHL Playoffs Senators battle past Penguins to force Game 7

NHL Playoffs Senators battle past Penguins to force Game 7

BOX SCORE

OTTAWA, Ontario -- Craig Anderson and the Ottawa Senators bounced back nicely two days after a blowout loss put them on the brink of elimination.

Anderson stopped 45 shots, Mike Hoffman scored the tiebreaking goal early in the third period and the Senators beat the Pittsburgh Penguins 2-1 Tuesday night to force a decisive Game 7 in the Eastern Conference Finals.

The 36-year-old Anderson was coming off a pair of rough outings, including Sunday when he was pulled after yielding four goals in Ottawa's 7-0 loss in Game 5 at Pittsburgh.

"You can't change what happens in the past," said Anderson, who has credited work with a sports psychologist early in his career for helping him manage the mental side of the game. "From that moment on you have to look forward and get ready for the next one."

Hoffman fired a slap shot through traffic off a pass from Fredrik Claesson to put the Senators ahead at 1:34 of the third. Bobby Ryan also scored a rare power-play goal for Ottawa.

It was quite a response after the drubbing in the previous game.

"I think the biggest message for us was if somebody told us back in training camp in September that we'd have an opportunity to win Game 6 in the Eastern Conference final at home in front of our fans we would've taken it," Ryan said. "So let's not dwell, let's not kick ourselves and put our heads down. Let's embrace this opportunity to extend this for two more days together and go from there."

Evgeni Malkin gave Pittsburgh, vying for its second straight trip to the Stanley Cup Final, the lead early in the second period and Matt Murray finished with 28 saves.

"I thought we played a real good game," Penguins coach Mike Sullivan said. "I thought we dominated zone time. We had lots of chances. We didn't score tonight. The puck didn't go in the net, but if we continue to play the game that way, then I believe we'll get the result."

Game 7 is Thursday night in Pittsburgh, with the winner advancing to face the Nashville Predators for the championship.

Ottawa was primarily looking for a return to structure in Game 6, beginning with a smoother start -- which they got. Notable in a scoreless opening period were two effective penalty kills, one of which saw Viktor Stalberg get the best opportunity short-handed.

Pittsburgh had four shots with the man advantage, but Anderson stopped them all. It was evident early that he had his game back in this one. He stopped Nick Bonino off a rebound in transition, Scott Wilson off a deflected shot by Phil Kessel, and Bonino again when Kyle Turris gave the puck away.

Anderson then stopped 22 of 23 shots in the second period.

"I think Anderson was the reason that they got this one, he played big for them," Murray said. "But in our room we just focus on what we need to do. We played really well, we just didn't get the bounces and weren't able to put one home."

Anderson's performance was a reminder for Senators coach Guy Boucher of why he took the job with Ottawa in the first place last May.

"I'll be honest with you, if I didn't have a No. 1 goalie, I didn't want the job," Boucher said. "I've lived it for quite a few years, and it's hell when you don't have it because everything you do turns to darkness, and there's nothing that really matters when you don't have a real No. 1 goaltender.

"It's like a quarterback in football and a pitcher in baseball, and we have it," Boucher added.

Murray was also sharp. The 22-year-old, who replaced Marc-Andre Fleury after Game 3, made maybe his finest save of the first on Derick Brassard, who found an open lane down the middle of the ice following a pass from Ryan.

The Penguins appeared to have opened the scoring just over three minutes into the second, but Trevor Daley was deemed to have interfered with Anderson following an Ottawa challenge.

Less than two minutes later though, Pittsburgh took the 1-0 lead anyway off a few moments of brilliance from Malkin. The playoff scoring leading (24 points) bounced off a check from Zack Smith behind the goal and after being stopped on his drive to the net, followed up with a nifty backhand rebound to beat Anderson.

It was the 153rd career playoff point in 142 games for Malkin -- three back of Sidney Crosby for second among active players behind Jaromir Jagr -- who had been jarring with Hoffman a few minutes earlier.

The Senators had little going until a lengthy 5-on-3 advantage for 1:24 just past the midway point of the period. The Ottawa power play, which had gone 0 for 29 in the previous 10 games, came through with Ryan ultimately wiring a one-timer short-side to tie the score.

It was the sixth goal and 15th point of the playoffs for Ryan, who is second on the Senators behind captain Erik Karlsson (16 points).

Flyers prospect Sam Dove-McFalls hopes versatility leads to NHL contract

Flyers prospect Sam Dove-McFalls hopes versatility leads to NHL contract

WINDSOR, Ontario — Flyers prospect Sam Dove-McFalls is hoping a move back to wing will make him a more versatile player as he looks to make the jump to pro hockey next season.

Dove-McFalls, a natural center, has spent parts of his fourth season in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League playing wing because of injuries among the Sea Dogs' forward group.

The 20-year-old is hoping his versatility will help earn his entry-level contract from the Flyers and a spot in Lehigh Valley.

"It can only be beneficial for me to play both positions, it'll help me be more versatile for when I get to the next level," Dove-McFalls said Monday at the Memorial Cup. "Some guys play one position their whole career, they have to play there, otherwise they're not able to play their game, so I think it's only good for me that I spent some time playing the wing this year."

A knee injury limited the 6-foot-1, 202-pound forward to just 29 games last season. Even when he did return to the Saint John lineup, Dove-McFalls admitted he wasn't 100 percent.

However, after a full summer of training, the Montreal native felt better than ever entering the 2016-17 season.

"I did a lot of power skating. I felt my skating was better and I felt a lot more confident out there," he said. "Last year, I was getting a little frustrated and stuff.

"[I] got more explosive and I think I move around the ice a lot better."

The work put in during the summer paid off this season as Dove-McFalls set new career highs for goals (17) and points (53) in 66 games with the Sea Dogs. He added five goals and seven assists in 18 playoff games.

One of Dove-McFalls' goals for this season was to earn his entry-level contract from the Flyers. He has until June 1 to do so before the Flyers lose his exclusive rights, according to CapFriendly.com. Drafted in the fourth round (98th overall) in 2015, Dove-McFalls could make the jump to the Phantoms next season if signed.

"Obviously, you do [think about it], but you have to play for the team," Dove-McFalls said. "I don't control what they do and what decision they make. All I can do is try to play my best.

"When the team does well, then everyone does well. Hopefully, that's going to happen, that's the plan."

Dove-McFalls is in constant communication with Flyers player development coach John Riley, and the two don't always talk just hockey.

"[He] just sends me articles about pro athletes and what the pro life is all about," Dove-McFalls said. "Not necessarily always just hockey — stuff that's off the ice too. When he does come and watch me play, he focuses more on the hockey part.

"[The articles] show how hard it is to be a pro and how dedicated you have to be to the game. Articles on Tom Brady or Kobe Bryant — those greats who are dedicated to their game."

Dove-McFalls continued a trend for Flyers prospects this spring. He became the fourth straight to win a President Trophy as QMJHL champions, joining Philippe Myers (Rouyn-Noranda, 2016), Sam Morin (Rimouski, 2015) and Nicolas Aube-Kubel (Val-d'Or, 2014).

Described as a big two-way forward who can kill penalties and contribute offensively, Dove-McFalls points to current Flyer Sean Couturier and Carolina Hurricanes center Jordan Staal as NHLers he tries to model his game after.

In order to make that jump to the pro game, Saint John coach Danny Flynn thinks Dove-McFalls needs to continue improving on his skating.

"He has to continue to work on foot speed. He has to continue to play a solid two-way game, but he has a good feel for how he's got to play," Flynn said. "If I were to be critical, because all young kids need development from our best player to our weakest player, foot speed would be an area that he'd like to improve on."

Seeing youngsters such as Travis Konecny and defenseman Ivan Provorov make the jump to the NHL has Dove-McFalls excited for the future.

"It's interesting," he said. "Obviously, they had nine or 10 guys at the world juniors this year and then you have Konecny and Provorov who were already on the team, so that's exciting. We have a lot of good young prospects.

"I think the organization is moving in the right direction. I'm not really looking too far ahead, I realize I'm still a long ways away, but it's good they're going in the right direction stockpiling prospects."