Flyers' point streak ends with loss to Panthers

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Flyers' point streak ends with loss to Panthers

BOX SCORE

SUNRISE, Fla. -- Too complicated. Lackadaisical. Overlooking the opponent.

Those were the buzzwords Monday night from the Flyers after a 3-1 loss to the Florida Panthers that ended their seven-game point streak (see Instant Replay).

It was their first loss in regulation play in eight games and first loss on the road in regulation since Oct. 12 in Detroit.

“We played too complicated and had some sloppiness in our game,” defenseman Mark Streit said. “Too many turnovers, a lot in the neutral zone, and it cost us the game.

“We played hard the last 5-10 minutes of the third period, but it’s not good enough in this league and that’s why we lost this game.”

The Flyers were brutal with the puck in the neutral zone for two periods and seemed to be second on the puck far too often through 40 minutes, as the Panthers got a 2-0 jump on them.

“That’s a good way to put it,” Flyer captain Claude Giroux said. “They were jumping. They wanted it more than us. In the third period we played a little better, but it was too late. We got out-battled the first two periods.”

The bottom line is the Flyers failed to do the little things they had done so well during their past seven games. Skate well. Be hard on the puck. Covet the puck in neutral ice. Slow down things in the middle.

“Our [defensemen] were taking their time getting the puck,” Scott Hartnell said. “Our forwards were slow getting back on defense through the neutral zone. They were coming pretty hard with back pressure. We were tired, turning the puck over right back at us. All the stuff we weren't doing the last half-dozen games.”

As for playing complicated hockey …

“We didn’t go north enough,” Hartnell said. “We tried to make behind-the-back passes. Not just one line, but all of us. We got distracted. Maybe we thought we were the better team coming in here and it [would] be an easy game. If you underestimate your opponent in this league, you are going to get screwed and lose the game. We did just that.”

Coach Craig Berube said his team had poor execution in the first two periods, especially in the neutral zone.

“We were lackadaisical a little bit,” Berube said.

Asked about overconfidence against the second-worst club in the Eastern Conference, he said that was addressed at the morning skate.

“Who are we to overlook anyone?” Berube asked. “We talked about it this morning about being ready and I’m not sure we were.”

Wayne Simmonds had the lone Flyer goal.

“We were sluggish and it carried through the second [period],” Simmonds said. “We didn’t play the game we wanted to … we were trying to make stupid plays in the neutral zone. They played a good game and they got turnovers.”

Ron Hextall talks Flyers' draft focus, scouting reports on top prospects and more

Ron Hextall talks Flyers' draft focus, scouting reports on top prospects and more

While the NHL draft doesn't begin until Friday evening in Chicago, the Flyers' scouting department and management have been in the Windy City since Tuesday.

Talk about getting a head start for Friday's No. 2 overall selection.

"After the last meeting, you sit and we're talking about players," Flyers general manager Ron Hextall said this week. "There might be certain answers we need on players and they go back and do their homework.

"You have a couple more meetings and get back with a little more information. Things will change as we get more information to gather. Things will change a little bit but not too much, but we'll be more prepared."

The Flyers are expected to select either Halifax's Nico Hischier or Brandon's Nolan Patrick — both centermen — depending upon which player the New Jersey Devils tab at No. 1.

NHL Central Scouting's final rankings had the 6-foot-3, 198-pound Patrick ranked first over Hischier, who is 6-foot, 176 pounds. Hextall cautioned that the team doesn't always go by "public opinion," nor does its rankings always mirror those of Central Scouting.

"If you look at every team's list, they're way different," he said. "If you took the 31 lists, there would be a lot of differences."

The Flyers have 11 picks in the draft. Given they are very deep in defensive prospects and goaltenders, but short on wingers, they are expected to load up on forwards (see story).

"You kind of look at it that we do have a lot of defensemen," Hextall said. "Right now, in a perfect world, sit here and say, 'If we got seven forwards, three defensemen and a goalie,' [that would be ideal]. We're not going to pick a goalie if we don't see a goalie as a value pick.

"If we get to a guy we like and he's still there, then we'll take a goalie, but we're not going to chase a goalie this year. I would expect we'll pick one, but we're not going to chase one. On D? If we get two, I'm OK with that."

There is separation after Patrick and Hischier in terms of how other players in the first round relate to them.

It's fair to say that had the Flyers been picking at No. 13 — their original spot before they got lucky in the draft lottery — the field would have been wide open with a number of players of equal ability at 13, whereas, at No. 2, there's a defined two.

"It's harder to sort," Hextall said of his original draft position. "Because there's a lot of good players. There really is. We were sitting there at 13 and we were kind of zeroing in and we were pretty excited about the player we were going to get at 13.

"People talk about this draft, they say it's not a very good draft. They're wrong. It's a good draft. It might not be like the last two were, but the last two were bumpers. This is a good draft."

Here's Hextall's quick take on a few of the top players in the first round, in no particular order after Patrick and Hischier:

"We had dinner with both of them," Hextall said of the top two players in the draft. "And we met with them at the combine. So we've got certain more information on those two than some other guys. There were some other guys we had more time with, too.

"They're both two-way players. They both make plays. They can both score goals. They both compete hard. Hischier has a little bit more quickness and speed to his game. Patrick's a little bit more looks for the right play and makes the play. They're both really good players. Both should be top NHL players."

Gabriel Vilardi: 6-2, 193-pound center, who played for Windsor in the OHL (see story).

"I was in Europe during the Memorial Cup," Hextall said. "He's another good player. Smart, really skilled, big body."

Klim Kostin: 6-3, 198-pound center/left wing, who played for Dynamo Moscow in Russia.

"He's a big horse, talented guy," Hextall said. "That's another thing, the Russian thing. How much do you put into it? But he's a high-end talent."

Cale Makar: 5-10, 175-pound defenseman, who played with Brooks in the Alberta Junior League.

"Really good," Hextall said. "He skates really well. He's got a really high skill level. Moves the puck well. Right-handed shot. Played in Brooks. Played at a level that's not the major junior level, but he's a really good player."

Miro Heiskanen: 6-0, 174-pound Finnish defenseman, who played with HIFK.

"Heiskanen's a really good player," Hextall said. "Very well-rounded defenseman, moves the puck. He's a good one."

Although he is not expected to be among the top 100 players taken in the draft, Keith Primeau's son, Cayden, a 6-2¾, 181-pound goalie, who played with Lincoln in the USHL, is expected to be drafted (see story).

Primeau was ranked seventh by Central Scouting among North American goalies.

"I saw Cayden here at the prospects game," Hextall said. "He's good, he's got good size, good positioning, he moves well. Seems to read the game pretty well. He's a good prospect."

Ron Hextall: Vegas 'obviously did their homework' on Pierre-Edouard Bellemare

Ron Hextall: Vegas 'obviously did their homework' on Pierre-Edouard Bellemare

Flyers general manager Ron Hextall on Wednesday night reacted to losing alternate captain Pierre-Edouard Bellemare to the Vegas Golden Knights in the NHL expansion draft (see story).

"There were a number of guys I felt like there was a chance we would lose," Hextall said. "And Belly was on that list.

"Vegas obviously did their homework and have themselves a good player. Pierre-Edouard is a character member of our organization and he'll be missed."

Bellemare is the Flyers' second alternate captain to depart the club in the same calendar year. Mark Streit, whose "A" Bellemare inherited, was traded to Pittsburgh via Tampa at the NHL trade deadline.

Streit will likely see his name engraved on the Stanley Cup. The Penguins plan to petition to get his name on the Cup even though Streit did not play in the Final against Nashville.

As for Bellemare, the 32-year-old center was left unprotected by the Flyers last weekend. He signed a two-year contract in March that carries a $1.45 million cap hit per.

Bellemare had 17 goals and 34 points in 237 games in three seasons with the Flyers after signing with the team in June 2014.

"He's a terrific team player and an even better human being," Hextall said. "He was great in the community and he'll be a real nice piece for Vegas."