Philadelphia Flyers

Flyers stumped by Bernier, PK in opening loss

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Flyers stumped by Bernier, PK in opening loss

BOX SCORE

Updated: 11:42 p.m.

They had energy. They were sharp much of the game. As was their goalie, Steve Mason.

The only troubling carryover from exhibition play that doomed the Flyers in their season opener Wednesday night against Toronto was … their power play.
 
Seven opportunities. One goal. Thirteen scoring chances.
 
“Yeah, we had our chances,” said Flyers captain Claude Giroux after a 3-1 loss. “(Jonathan) Bernier played well but we had the offense. It’s a tough loss but we did a lot of good things out there and most of the game, we dominated.”
 
Bernier -- 31 saves -- was superb in goal, even denying Wayne Simmonds on a penalty shot.
 
The goals on Mason weren’t his fault. Two saw breakdowns in front of him. Did we mention he became the eighth different starting goalie for the Flyers in the past 11 seasons?
 
“You make the initial save and do your best to get into position for the next shot,” Mason said. “They made some good plays on rebounds.”
 
This was a back-to-back for Toronto, which was without one of its top forwards -- David Clarkson (suspension). The Leafs were very strong in the final period. Once they took the lead, they hunkered down.
 
“It's never easy to come into this building, especially on a back-to-back,” Bernier said. “We got in to a little bit of a PK problem but we came back from it, and that's what a good team does.”

Dave Bolland broke a 1-1 tie just 2:30 into the third period with an uncontested shot on Mason as Matt Read pretty much lost sight of him in the slot.

The Flyers then had consecutive power plays, failed and visibly sagged as Toronto’s PK momentum kicked in.
 
“Yeah, it seemed after that it wasn’t like the first period,” Vinny Lecavalier said. “We had trouble getting in there and keeping position. They played back more when they went up 2-1. They played a good road game.”
 
There were a couple of surprises in this one.
 
Jakub Voracek, who spent time in practice on the third line this week, stayed there working with Sean Couturier and Max Talbot.
 
His spot on the top line with Scott Hartnell and Giroux was taken by Brayden Schenn.
 
“We’re trying to get a balance on scoring throughout [the lineup],” explained coach Peter Laviolette. “We threw 75 attempts at the net and 30-plus shots. You’d like to walk away with more than one goal.
 
“Having Brayden up there and trying to get him going, I thought he played good on that line. That line generated some chances. Again, you’d like to see one or two of them drop in on five-on-five.”
 
Poor opening periods have been the Flyers' nemesis during the regular season in past years, but that wasn’t the case here.
 
Despite being outshot early, they rallied off a couple of very strong power plays and had the puck in Toronto’s end most of the opening period.
 
So dominant were the Flyers early, that Toronto went 12:13 without a shot.
 
“Defensively, we were responsible,” Giroux said.
 
Hartnell, in perhaps the best shape of his life as a Flyer, had an excellent chance off the rush that period on a pass from Giroux, but his quick redirect kissed the left post. He had seven attempts at the net in the game, yet just one official shot.
 
Actually, the Flyers had a number of good scoring chances and were finally rewarded on their third power play of the game with 6.9 seconds left in the period.
 
Schenn, who had briefly fought Joffrey Lupul (check on Giroux), got out of the box in time to camp out in the slot. Lecavalier sent him the puck from behind the net, and Schenn one-timed it past Bernier.
 
“Anytime you score a goal and help contribute to the team is obviously a plus and a bonus,” Schenn said. “There was some pretty nifty work by Vinny down low, which just goes to show you how good he is.”
 
Mason had a very strong second period, facing nine shots, and he nearly escaped unscathed. He stopped Lupul in the crease around the 12-minute mark, had a nice kick save on Phil Kessel after Kimmo Timonen turned it over at the blue line and two stops on Bolland.
 
Kessel, however, seemed determined to score after that save and put in a late rebound to tie it. That goal began with a bad, errant long pass by Max Talbot in neutral ice that quickly got turned back up on the Flyers.
 
To make matters worse, Talbot didn’t get back quick enough and defenseman Nick Grossmann got tangled up with Nazem Kadri after Dion Phaneuf’s shot became the rebound for Kessel.
 
Still, the Flyers caught a break with 3.1 seconds left as Simmonds stole a puck for a breakaway and was awarded a debatable penalty shot after being tripped by Paul Ranger.
 
Simmonds attacked Bernier with a weaving attempt to get him moving, then tried to go five-hole and was denied.
 
“It would have been the difference in the game I think,” Simmonds said.
 
Not as much as the failed power play chances.

NHL Notes: Devils lose Travis Zajac for 4-6 months with pectoral injury

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NHL Notes: Devils lose Travis Zajac for 4-6 months with pectoral injury

NEWARK, N.J. -- The New Jersey Devils have lost top center Travis Zajac for four to six months with a pectoral injury.

Devils executive vice president and general manager Ray Shero announced that Zajac had surgery to repair the pectoral muscle on Thursday.

Shero said the Zajac was hurt last week during offseason training.

Dr. Jonathan L. Glashow performed the surgery and estimated that Zajac's recovery time could last until February. The season starts in October.

The 32-year-old Zajac had 14 goals and 31 assists last season. He has 155 career goals and 280 assists. He has played for the Devils since the 2006-07 season.

The 20th overall pick in the 2004 NHL Draft, Zajac signed an eight-year, $46 million contract in 2013.

Sabres sign Zemgus Girgensons to 2-year deal

Sabres: Team signs forward Girgensons to 2-year deal
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- The Buffalo Sabres have signed forward Zemgus Girgensons to a two-year contract.

The team announced the deal Thursday that carries an average value of $1.6 million.

Girgensons, from Latvia, is the last of the Sabres' restricted free agents to sign with the team. Buffalo's first-round pick in 2012 has 37 goals and 49 assists in 277 career games over four seasons.

He skated in a career-best 75 games last season after signing a one-year extension last September.

NHL Notes: Oilers sign star Leon Draisaitl to mega 8-year contract

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NHL Notes: Oilers sign star Leon Draisaitl to mega 8-year contract

EDMONTON, Alberta -- The Edmonton Oilers have signed center Leon Draisaitl to an eight-year contract extension with an average annual value of $8.5 million.

The extension runs through the 2024-25 season, similar to the eight-year, $100-million extension superstar captain Connor McDavid signed with the team in July.

With the signings, the Oilers are banking on McDavid and Draisaitl providing a potent one-two punch for the team as it looks to build on last season's return to the playoffs after a decade of futility.

Draisaitl, a 21-year-old German, had 77 points (29 goals, 48 assists) last season, his third in the NHL.

He finished eighth among NHL scorers, and second on the Oilers behind McDavid.

He led the Oilers in scoring during the 2017 playoffs, posting 16 points (six goals, 10 assists) in 13 games.

Draisaitl was selected third overall by the Oilers at the 2015 draft (see full story).

Avalanche: Hobey Baker winner Butcher now free agent
College hockey's top player is an NHL free agent after former University of Denver defenseman Will Butcher allowed a deadline to pass without signing with the Colorado Avalanche.

The Avalanche selected Butcher in the fifth round of the 2013 draft and had until Tuesday to sign the Hobey Baker Award winner who led Denver to a national championship in April.

A person with direct knowledge of the discussions told The Associated Press on Wednesday that Butcher already has had discussions with the Buffalo Sabres, New Jersey Devils and NHL-expansion Vegas Golden Knights. The person said Butcher has not yet narrowed his list, and is also talking with other teams.

The person spoke to the AP on the condition of anonymity because the talks are private.

The Denver Post first reported the three specific teams expressing interest in Butcher (see full story).

Wild: Cullen comes home for 21st NHL season
The Minnesota Wild and center Matt Cullen have agreed to a one-year, $1 million contract, bringing him back to his home state for a 21st season in the NHL.

The Wild announced the deal, which includes $700,000 in potential performance bonuses, on Wednesday.

Cullen played the last two years with Pittsburgh, winning consecutive Stanley Cups with the Penguins. He played three seasons for the Wild from 2010-13, his first return to Minnesota since launching his career at Moorhead High School and St. Cloud State.

Cullen, who will turn 41 on Nov. 2, had 13 goals and 18 assists in 72 games in 2016-17 for the Penguins, plus two goals and seven assists in 25 playoff games. He has played in 1,366 career regular season games, the sixth-most among active players (see full story).