Fred Shero inducted to Hockey Hall of Fame

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Fred Shero inducted to Hockey Hall of Fame

Finally, Freddy the Fog gets his due.
 
Fred Shero, the greatest coach in Flyers history, has been voted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.
 
The announcement came Tuesday in Toronto.
 
“I am thrilled to hear that Fred Shero was elected to the HHOF,” Flyers chairman Ed Snider said. "There's no sense looking back as to why it didn't happen sooner, because today's a happy day to celebrate the fact that a guy that deserves it immensely has finally been elected to the Hall of Fame. It's a great day for the Philadelphia Flyers.”
 
Shero joins the 2013 class in the Builders Category, and only one coach is elected per year. The other nominee there was the late Pat Burns.

Penguins general manager Ray Shero -- son of Fred -- told CSNPhilly.com, "This is a great honor for my dad and our family since he isn't here for it. Better late than never! I have always appreciated your support of my father over the years. I am glad he has finally received his due. Hopefully it will open doors for other coaches on the builder category.

"He was always about his players, so I know he would want to thank them for making this happen. Also to Mr. Snider and Mr. (Keith) Allen for giving him his chance in the NHL back in 1971. I know people like them and Bob Clarke have pushed for this a long time." 

Joining Shero from the players' side was Chris Chelios, Scott Niedermayer and Brendan Shanahan. Geraldine Heaney, a 2002 Olympic gold medalist, became the third woman elected. Eric Lindros was again turned down.
 
Shero brought two Stanley Cups to the Flyers in 1974 and 1975, but his legacy as a coach far exceeds that.
 
“Win today and we walk together forever,” he scribbled on a blackboard before Game 6 of the Cup Final in 1974 against Boston.
 
Shero won that day, but would never know how difficult it would be to “win” a seat at the Hall of Fame years later.
 
It has taken decades for Shero to be inducted. He resigned from the Rangers 20 games into the 1981 season. That was the last time he coached.
 
Shero’s coaching career spanned a brief 10 year years in NHL, after nearly 15 as a successful minor league coach.
 
His achievements, well, they not only outlasted him but also will stand forever:
 
· Four Stanley Cup final appearances
· Two Cups
· First coach to employ systems
· First to hire assistant coaches
· First to employ in-season strength training
· First to breakdown film
· First to travel abroad to study Soviet influences
· Among the first to use morning skates
 
“The Hall of Fame is for people who have done things for the sport of hockey,” said Clarke, the greatest player Shero coached, for a series of stories in 2009 on CSNPhilly.com pushing for Shero’s induction. “Freddy did that. He was ahead of Roger Neilson for using video. He was ahead of other coaches for using system hockey. He won at them minor league and NHL level and he was way ahead of his time.
 
“Sometimes we forget. It’s not the National Hockey League Hall of Fame. It’s the Hockey Hall of Fame. That’s why Europeans are getting in and it’s why lots of outstanding minor leaguers from different eras never were thought about as being Hall of Famers, but probably should have been. Freddy’s NHL record is good enough to get in and put on his minor league record and he’s Hall of Fame material.”
 
Shero coached 734 NHL games and won 390. Two years after leaving the Rangers, he was diagnosed with stomach cancer. The disease eventually took his life in 1990.
 
Shero read books constantly. It was fabric for his coaching career.
 
“Some of the things he did at the time, players thought was off the wall,” recalled Lou Lamoriello, general manager of the New Jersey Devils. “But I believe, too, he was somewhat of a disciple of Lloyd Percival’s hockey handbook and I remember Fred talking about that on different occasions.”
 
Percival’s “The Hockey Handbook” was published in 1951, six years before Shero began his minor league coaching career. Shero reportedly memorized the book, and used it as tool for future study.
 
It was one of many books that influenced his life behind the bench. And not every book was on hockey, either.
 
“He was really big on John Wooden and had a lot of Wooden stuff around the house and books,” Ray Shero said.
 
“Dad saw how [Wooden] used his psychology of reading people at UCLA as applicable to hockey. My dad was pretty quiet, but if he trusted you, he would engage you and talk for hours about things. He was a big, big reader and even on Russian history. After the first Cup, he went to Russia and brought my mom for three weeks. He met with Boris Mikhailov and took Lou Vairo over there. It was a hockey seminar. He must have met with Viktor Tikhonov, too. He really loved it.”

Ray Shero called his father an innovator.

“He won a championship at every level he coached at. The contribution and innovation he made to the game, if you talk to the players who played for him and not me, he was ahead of his time," Ray Shero said. "He delved into the Soviet way of hockey way before when, the video, the assistant coaches. I have a lot of his stuff still today.
 
“Forty years into the future, some of the stuff he did was pretty amazing. I always thought he was deserving."
 
For a man who smoked too much and drank too much, Shero believed in fitness for his players. He introduced them to a funny looking machine. You might say it was the prehistoric predecessor to a Universal or Nautilus equipment.
 
“He had this contraption called The Apollo with ropes all over it,” Ray Shero recalled. “Guys would use it off ice. It was a tube with ropes, similar to bands we have now.”
 
Said Clarke, “We were the first team that had off-ice training with the Apollo machine, which was weight training. No one else was doing that.”
 
Columbus Blue Jackets president of hockey operations John Davidson said that Shero had a unique way of motivating people simply by a touch.
 
“He was innovative in how he tried to motivate people,” Davidson said. “He could do things even through his hands. He would find ways to touch you on the bench [to send a message]. He was a man of few words.”
 
Clarke said Shero’s bench strategy was simply to keep players' minds in the game.
 
“He’d walk up and down the bench, ‘how much time left in the period,’ ” Clarke said. “Bleep Freddy, look it up yourself. But his game plan was, if there were five minutes left to play, this is how he wanted us to play. He wanted everyone to know how much time was left on the clock. None of us had ever seen this approach.”
 
Or his approach after losses.
 
“He would have 8 a.m. practices,” Clarke said. “If you lost a game, the next day practice was low key, almost lackadaisical. But if you won, he would work the hell out of you. He always felt if you were winning, you could get more work out of a man.
 
“If you were losing, your energy was low, and let’s get it back and not waste it in practice. But when we won, and we won a lot, we practiced. It’s the exact opposite philosophy of coaches today where if a team plays bad, they skate the hell out of you. He never did that. His practices were always for the purpose to get better.”

NHL Notes: Brandon Pirri, Rangers agree to terms on one-year deal

NHL Notes: Brandon Pirri, Rangers agree to terms on one-year deal

NEW YORK -- The New York Rangers have agreed to terms with forward Brandon Pirri on a $1.1 million, one-year deal.

The 25-year-old Pirri spent last season with the Florida Panthers and Anaheim Ducks, recording 14 goals and 15 assists in 61 games. His 29 points were a career high.

A second-round pick, 59th overall, in the 2009 draft, Pirri has been traded twice and was considered a potential bargain in NHL free agency. Pirri is something of a shootout specialist, scoring on five of his six attempts last season, and that 83.3 percent success rate ranked first among players with at least five attempts.

In 166 NHL games with the Chicago Blackhawks, Panthers and Ducks, Pirri has 49 goals and 31 assists for 90 points.

Enroth replaces injured Lerner for Sweden at World Cup
NEW YORK -- With goaltender Robin Lehner still not fully healthy, Sweden replaced him on its World Cup of Hockey roster with Jhonas Enroth.

The Buffalo Sabres' starting goalie was bothered by a right ankle injury for much of last season that limited him to 21 NHL games. Lehner underwent surgery in March and had been working to get ready for the World Cup, which begins Sept. 17 in Toronto.

"We really wanted to give Robin the opportunity to recover from his injury from last year, but unfortunately it wasn't enough time for him to feel 100 percent recovered," coach Rikard Gronborg said in a statement released by the Swedish Ice Hockey Association.

Concussion problems held Lehner to 23 games in 2014-15, and he looked to be over those after the Ottawa Senators traded him to Buffalo at the 2015 draft. The 25-year-old injured his ankle early in the season opener and aggravated it in March.

It was not immediately clear when the Sabres expect Lehner to be back to 100 percent.

"As Robin continues to progress during the offseason in his rehab from last season's ankle injury, he felt that it was best to withdraw from Team Sweden for the upcoming World Cup," Buffalo general manager Tim Murray said in a statement. "Robin felt it was important to continue his rehab in Buffalo to prepare for training camp. He has been working out both on and off the ice and we look forward to seeing him on the ice with our team next month."

Enroth, who spent last season with the Los Angeles Kings, recently signed a one-year deal with the Toronto Maple Leafs. He joins Henrik Lundqvist of the New York Rangers and Jacob Markstrom of the Vancouver Canucks as the goalies on Sweden's roster.

The 28-year-old has a 2.80 goals-against average and .911 save percentage in 147 career NHL games. Enroth was on the Swedish team that earned a silver medal at the 2014 Sochi Olympics, though he never appeared in a game. He started for Sweden at the 2013 and 2015 world hockey championships, winning gold in 2013 with a 1.15 GAA and .956 save percentage (see full story).

NHL Notes: Panthers flip Dave Bolland's contract, prospect Lawson Crouse to Coyotes for picks

NHL Notes: Panthers flip Dave Bolland's contract, prospect Lawson Crouse to Coyotes for picks

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- The Arizona Coyotes have acquired prospect Lawson Crouse and veteran Dave Bolland's contract from the Florida Panthers for two draft picks.

Arizona sent a 2017 third-round pick and a conditional 2018 second-rounder that could become another 2017 third to Florida. The Coyotes are taking on the final three years of the injured Bolland's deal to pick up Crouse, the 11th pick in the 2015 draft.

Nagging injuries limited Bolland to 25 games last season, and the 30-year-old forward has three years left on his deal at a salary-cap hit of $5.5 million. But Arizona general manager John Chayka said Bolland isn't expected to play for the foreseeable future and could be placed on long-term injured reserve.

Crouse, 19, is a 6-foot-4 left winger who could make his NHL debut this fall.

Avalanche name Jared Bednar head coach
DENVER -- The Colorado Avalanche have hired Jared Bednar as their new head coach.

Bednar replaces Patrick Roy, who abruptly stepped down as coach and vice president of hockey operations earlier this month.

The 44-year-old Bednar won the American Hockey League's Calder Cup championship as coach of the Lake Erie Monsters last season. He also won the ECHL's Kelly Cup in 2009 with the South Carolina Stingrays.

President of hockey operations and general manager Joe Sakic said upon Roy's sudden resignation that he'd look outside the organization for Colorado's next coach. He did just that with Bednar, who had been in the Columbus system.

Sidney Crosby named Canada's captain for World Cup of Hockey
Canada has chosen Sidney Crosby as its captain for the upcoming World Cup of Hockey.

Crosby returns as Canada's captain after wearing the "C" for the 2014 Sochi Olympics. He's coming off his second Stanley Cup as captain of the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Chicago Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews and Montreal Canadiens defenseman Shea Weber will serve as the alternates.

Crosby scored one of Canada's biggest goals in international history when he beat U.S. goaltender Ryan Miller to win the gold medal on home ice at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. Now 29, he has two gold medals, two Cup rings and a Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP.

Canada begins training camp Sept. 5 in Ottawa. The World Cup begins Sept. 17 in Toronto (see full story).

Coyotes hire NHL's first female coach
GLENDALE, Ariz. -- The Arizona Coyotes have hired Dawn Braid as skating coach and say she is believed to be the first full-time female coach in NHL history.

Braid has a long association with the NHL.

She worked part-time for the Coyotes last year and has served as a skating consultant with the Toronto Maple Leafs, Anaheim Ducks, Buffalo Sabres and Calgary Flames.

Braid also spent seven years with the Athletes Training Center as director of skating development. Among the skaters she worked with while there is New York Islanders center John Tavares (see full story).

Philadelphia to host 2016 U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame ceremony

Philadelphia to host 2016 U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame ceremony

Philadelphia will host the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame induction ceremony on Nov. 30.

USA Hockey on Tuesday announced that the Flyers will host the event for the first time.

The 2016 Hall of Fame class includes legendary high school coach Bill Belisle, former NHL forward Craig Janney, and the 1996 World Cup of Hockey team. 

That team featured Brett Hull, Brian Leetch and Abington native Mike Richter. It also has a special connection with Philly. The 1996 World Cup of Hockey was the first sporting event played at the CoreStates Center (now the Wells Fargo Center). The U.S. would go on to win the tournament.

“We’re excited to bring the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame Induction Celebration to Philadelphia,” Dave Ogrean, executive director of USA Hockey, said in a statement. “It’s one of our nation’s very top hockey cities, thanks in large part to the decades-long efforts of the late Ed Snider, and fans in the area will enjoy being part of enshrining the Class of 2016. This is always one of the most anticipated events on the calendar each year and we’re grateful for the advance support we’ve received from the Flyers and our Atlantic Affiliate.”

Tuesday also marks 50 days until the Flyers begin their 50th anniversary season.