Grossmann exits vs. Rangers with groin injury

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Grossmann exits vs. Rangers with groin injury

NEW YORK – Nick Grossmann was counting his blessings at the morning skate Tuesday that it had been quite a while since he had suffered an injury blocking a shot.
 
Well, Grossmann, who has had an outstanding season so far, was injured in the first period and did not return.
 
He didn’t block a shot, though. Sources originally said he was believed to have suffered a hip flexor, but upon being reevaluated after the game, it was determined instead to be a groin injury.
 
“He’s been playing real well for us,” coach Peter Laviolette said. “To take a guy out of the lineup, puts stress on the back end. To lose someone like that is difficult.”
 
Grossmann actually finished the period.
 
He entered the game as the NHL’s leading shot-blocker with 66. He had two more that period and now has 68.
 
“When you play five-D most of the game, it’s tremendous physical pressure,” goalie Ilya Bryzgalov said.
 
“Our defense probably got exhausted. He’s a big man and he wins lots of battles around the boards.”

Ron Hextall on landing No. 2 overall pick: 'This is a big day for our franchise'

Ron Hextall on landing No. 2 overall pick: 'This is a big day for our franchise'

You remember the 2007 NHL draft?

The Flyers were robbed that year in the draft lottery and were forced to settle for the No. 2 overall pick later that June.

They chose James van Riemsdyk and the Chicago Blackhawks — drafting first — tabbed Patrick Kane.

Well, the Flyers got some needed payback Saturday night in Toronto at the 2017 draft lottery.
 
While the Flyers didn't win the top overall pick in this year's draft, they pretty much won the lottery just the same, moving from 13th overall to the No. 2 selection (see story).

"This is a big day for our franchise," said general manager Ron Hextall, who was an assistant general manager with Los Angeles in 2007 when it was Paul Holmgren's team in Philadelphia.

"When the 13th pick went by there and we knew we were one, two or three, that was a huge move for our franchise. We couldn't be more excited."

New Jersey will pick No. 1, and Dallas will pick third. Neither Colorado, the worst team in the NHL, nor Vegas, the newcomer to the NHL, made the top three.

The Flyers bucked enormous odds to advance from 13th to No. 2. They had a 2.4 percent chance of pulling it off. They were nearly 89 percent certain to remain at 13.

Maybe their luck is changing.

"We had a lot of bad luck this year," Hextall said. "I'm hoping this is a turning point for some of that to be turned around. This is a big point for our franchise. We're obviously going to get a very good player and hopefully in years, we'll look back on this as a turning point for us."

Depending on what the Devils do, the Flyers, who need offensive pop, are expected to select either Nolan Patrick or Nico Hischier, both promising forwards who are considered impact players.

While this draft is nowhere near as deep as last year's with Auston Matthews or Patrik Laine, it still holds quality in the first round and the Flyers are guaranteed a player who should make a difference.

"This isn't as bad as a draft as people say it is," Hextall said. "We felt with the 13th pick, we would get a good player. It's probably an average draft.

"The last couple drafts have been bumper but this is a good draft. Obviously, moving up to No. 2, we're going to get an even better player."

Patrick, from Winnipeg, Manitoba, played for the Brandon Wheat Kings of the Western Hockey League and was named the top skater by the NHL Central Scouting Bureau despite missing parts of the season with a lingering groin/abdominal injury.

The 6-foot-2, 198-pound center had 20 goals and 46 points in 33 games and still was a consensus No. 1 or 2 player by most scouts. His lineage is excellent, as his uncle, James Patrick, played 1,280 games.

Hischier is trying to become the highest-drafted Swiss player in NHL history. Nino Niederreiter was taken fifth overall by the New York Islanders in 2010.

The 6-foot, 176-pound Hischier led the QMJHL rookie class with 38 goals and 86 points in 57 games this season.

Can either Patrick or Hischier play right now?

"I don't know who that player is going to be," Hextall said. "Any player, as you know from my history, they got to come in and earn it.

"If we draft a player at No. 2 and he comes in and earns it, then he'll be on our team. If he needs more time, he needs more time."

That said, Hextall admitted his scouting staff had paid attention to pick anywhere from No. 1 to 13th or worse, especially after things started going south for the Flyers in late winter and the playoffs began slipping away.

Hextall would not compare this year's draft-eligible players, talk about them individually or indicate which player he felt might be available at No. 2.

For now, Hextall envisions keeping the second pick but wouldn't rule out trading down if the right offer was there.

"You can't say no to anything because you don't know what will come your way," Hextall said.

The Avalanche, who had the best shot at winning the No. 1 pick, will draft fourth. Vancouver is fifth and Vegas will pick sixth.

Hextall watched the draft lottery on TV after returning home from Finland.

"Sometimes you get some good luck and sometimes you get some bad luck," Hextall said. "This was a fortunate day for our franchise. This was a big one."

Facing long NHL draft lottery odds, Flyers land 2017 No. 2 pick

Facing long NHL draft lottery odds, Flyers land 2017 No. 2 pick

The Flyers are movin' on up. W-a-a-ay up.

The NHL held its annual draft lottery Saturday night in Toronto to determine the first 15 picks in the first round of the 2017 NHL draft and the Flyers shocked everyone.

They came into the lottery in the 13th position and despite l-o-n-g odds, managed to catapult themselves into the No. 2 pick.

New Jersey won the top pick with Dallas taking the third. Neither Colorado, which had the worst record in the league, nor the Vegas Golden Knights, an expansion team, finished in the top three.

It's sweet revenge for finishing last in 2007 and not getting the top pick (Patrick Kane), which went to Chicago. The Flyers chose James van Riemsdyk that draft.

Suddenly, the Flyers have a shot at picking from among the top-five forward prospects, as ranked by NHL Central Scouting for this draft. They are: Nolan Patrick, Nico Hischier, Casey Mittelstadt, Gabriel Vilardi and Michael Rasmussen.

Obviously, not making the playoffs has its rewards.

Dave Hakstol's club had a 2.2 percent chance to capture the first overall pick, as well as a 2.4 percent chance and 2.7 percent chance at the second and third overall pick, respectively.

They beat the odds.

The highest percentage saw them remaining at 13th overall (84.3 percent).

Because of the rules of the lottery, the 12 clubs not selected in the NHL draft lottery will be assigned NHL draft selections four through 15, in inverse order of regular-season points.

Hence, the Flyers could not pick fourth-12th and could only pick in the 1-3 positions, or fall to 14th (8.3 percent) or 15th (0.1 percent).

As was the case last year, the first three picks are decided by a lottery, but this year also included the newest NHL franchise, the Golden Knights, as part of the group.

Vegas was given the same odds as the team finishing with the third-fewest points during the 2016-17 regular season and held a 10.3 percent chance at winning the first overall pick.

The best chance at No. 1 overall going in was the Colorado Avalanche (18 percent) followed by the Vancouver Canucks (12.1 percent). Vegas and the Arizona Coyotes were next (10.3 percent).

Vegas was guaranteed to pick no lower than the sixth overall selection but held a 30 percent chance to finish with either the first, second or third overall pick.

The draft is June 23-24 in Chicago.