On paper, Flyers are better than record shows

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On paper, Flyers are better than record shows

This wasn’t supposed to happen.
 
The Sixers were supposed to be the worst team in town, not the Flyers. The Sixers still haven’t played a real game yet, so that means … it’s the Flyers.
 
And at 1-7, it’s the worst start to a season in the franchise’s 47-year history.
 
Incredibly, it feels a lot like last season’s lockout-shortened 2-6 start under Peter Laviolette, except the Flyers are actually a better team after eight games than that one was a year ago.
 
Now, try to convince the South Philly locals sitting around the bar at the Philadium of that. You can’t.
 
As one general manager with a recent Stanley Cup said this week, “On paper, this is a pretty good team.”
 
On the ice? There is no chemistry right now.
 
“It’s still the same feeling -- a bad feeling,” offered Wayne Simmonds after another hard, conditioning practice at Skate Zone.
 
“It feels crappy. The one thing we have going for us is our goaltending and we’re letting it kind of go to waste at this point. Both Mase [Steve Mason] and Ray [Emery] have played well for us. We haven’t picked up the slack on the other end.”
 
Flyers captain Claude Giruox did the quick math. There are 74 games left to turn this club around.
 
It’s not like the lockout when it was 48 games and because all of them were within your own conference, every night someone gained or lost in the standings, regardless.
 
“That’s a lot of games and we played eight,” Giroux said. “Obviously, the record, we’re not happy with it. We’re doing a lot of good things out there. We have to stay positive in this room. If we do, we’ll start winning games and putting ourselves back in playoff position.”
 
Asked about his message to the players as their captain, Giroux replied, “It’s not just up to me. There’s a lot of leaders here, coaches and Homer [general manager Paul Holmgren].
 
“We’re all getting on the same page. When that happens, that is when teams start being dangerous. Go out there without hesitation and just play the great game of hockey.”
 
The team has already fired its coach. Holmgren would be the next logical target, but how does firing your GM turn around a 1-7 start? And before that happens, Holmgren would likely make a major trade to shake things up.
 
That could very easily happen during this six-day break between games.
 
Newly-installed head coach Craig Berube admits you can make a case this fall resembles last January, but only in a superficial manner.
 
“It’s similar -- we’re not winning hockey games,” Berube said. “But I don’t look at it that way. I think we’re headed in the right direction.”
 
Last season, the Flyers had injuries even before the games began. Their defense was a mess and remained a mess. And they couldn’t score goals. Of those three issues, goal scoring woes are still present and that is the most alarming aspect of this club so far.
 
Simmonds said he doesn’t feel players “has quit on each other,” but that the team recognize it's still not playing a full 60 minutes every game.
 
“It’s a long season, we can only get better,” he said. “I don’t think we can get any worse at this point, anyway.”
 
On Thursday, the Flyers became the first team since the 1964 Boston Bruins not to score three goals in a game in at least one of their first eight contests.
 
So far, the Flyers have a measly 11 goals -- three of them from rookie call-up Tye McGinn.
 
“We got to be better -- plain and simple,” Simmonds said.
 
You can see players pressing to score on the ice. Rolling their eyes. Smashing sticks on the ice. Looking upward toward the ghost of Kate Smith overhead.
 
“It’s my job to keep these guys motivated and upbeat,” Berube said. “Look at a lot of the positive things we are doing good.
 
“You obviously have to look at the things we’re not doing good to win hockey games but they’re professionals ... So far, they are positive and motivated and they want to do well. That’s a good sign.”
 
A few wins would be an even better sign.
 
Loose pucks
Kimmo Timonen (lower body) remains day-to-day, Holmgren said, adding he is expected at Monday’s practice. Consensus among the staff is Timonen was not injured when hooked on the Penguins' first goal, but after being checked by Tanner Glass later in the second period. … Vinny Lecavalier (lower body) and Scott Hartnell (upper body) both will skate by themselves Sunday morning before joining teammates at the Eagles-Cowboys game. … Emery and Jakub Voracek each had a maintenance day off the ice. Both have minor aches, Berube indicated. ... The Flyers are off for the weekend.

AHL allowing players on minor-league deals to go to Olympics

AHL allowing players on minor-league deals to go to Olympics

Players on American Hockey League contracts will be eligible to play in the 2018 Winter Olympics.

President and CEO David Andrews confirmed through a league spokesman Wednesday that teams were informed they could loan players on AHL contracts to national teams for the purposes of participating in the Pyeongchang Olympics.

The AHL sent a memo to its 30 clubs saying players could only be loaned for Olympic participation from Feb. 5-26.

The Olympic men's hockey tournament runs from Feb. 9-25. Like the NHL, which is not having its players participate for the first time since 1994, the AHL does not have an Olympic break in its schedule.

The AHL's decision does not affect players assigned to that league on NHL one- or two-way contracts. No final decision has been made about those players.

NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly denied a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation report that the league had told its 31 teams that AHL players could be loaned to play in the Olympics. It was an AHL memo sent at the direction of that league's board of governors.

When the NHL announced in April that it wouldn't be sending players to South Korea after participating in five consecutive Olympics, Andrews said the AHL was prepared for Canada, the United States and other national federations to request players.

"I would guess we're going to lose a fair number of players," Andrews said in April. "Not just to Canada and the U.S., but we're going to lose some players to other teams, as well. But we're used to that. Every team in our league has usually got two or three guys who are on recalls to the NHL, so it's not going to really change our competitive integrity or anything else."

The U.S. and Canada are expected to rely heavily on players in European professional leagues and college and major junior hockey to fill out Olympic rosters without NHL players.

With AHL experience, Flyers prospect Nicolas Aube-Kubel out to score again

With AHL experience, Flyers prospect Nicolas Aube-Kubel out to score again

VOORHEES, N.J. — At the junior level, scoring was second nature to Nicolas Aube-Kubel, like riding a bike after you figure out the balance aspect.

Goals came in bunches and points piled up — that was his game and it came effortlessly at times, especially over his final two seasons with the QMJHL's Val-d'Or Foreurs, posting back-to-back campaigns of 38 markers and 80-plus assists.

"Usually in junior, scoring was always coming naturally to me, having points and goals," he said last week at Flyers development camp.

On the AHL ice last season, it was a whole new ballgame. For Aube-Kubel, Year 1 of pro hockey was a feeling-out process from start to finish. His prolific scoring didn't carry over much at all, as the speedy 5-foot-11 winger finished with nine goals and nine assists in 71 regular-season games for Lehigh Valley.

"Guys are better with the puck," he said of the AHL. "I've always been strong on the ice and skating-wise, too, but translating to the AHL, guys are faster, guys are quicker with the puck and less turnovers."

This was part of toeing the waters in a new surrounding. Not many prospects jump from the junior ranks to the AHL without missing a beat. Aube-Kubel, who turned 21 in May, wanted to fulfill his role and duties first before worrying about scoring. He finished the season as a plus-10, tied for fourth best on the team and tops among Phantoms with 70 or more games played.

"I've always been an offensive player," Aube-Kubel said. "From being my first year in the pros, I was trying more to focus on details and what the coach was telling me. I'm excited for next year and I'll try to step up my game, for sure, and try to do what I was doing in junior."

Following his fourth development camp, Aube-Kubel finds himself heading into an interesting second season with Lehigh Valley. A lot has changed since he was taken by the Flyers in the second round of the 2014 draft. With time, the organization has significantly built up its prospect pool and added depth at forward. 

Aube-Kubel is just fine with that.

"Since I've been drafted, there was depth," he said. "Any way I'm going to play in the NHL, I'm going to make my own spot. No one is going to give it to you. If there are more drafted players, it doesn't change anything."

He's also enjoyed working with the Phantoms' staff, led by head coach Scott Gordon. More development off the ice and a greater workload during games should help moving forward.

"I liked it. They treat you like a pro," he said. "Everyone does their own thing. If you cheat or if you're not serious about it, it's you to pay off. If you're not serious, it's going to be you that gets penalized."

If Aube-Kubel needs any comfort in the quiet start to his pro career, he can look back at his first season of junior play. He tallied just 10 goals and 27 points in 64 regular-season games. Then he jumped to 53 points (22 goals, 31 assists) in 65 games in 2013-14 before scoring at will over his third and fourth seasons with Val-d'Or.

Maybe easing his way in is just part of his hockey DNA.

If so, keep an eye on Aube-Kubel next season.

"This year, I was maybe more focusing on having a role and trying to do what the coach was asking of me," Aube-Kubel said. "Now that it's all set, I'm going to focus on offensive play. I don't want to put pressure on myself, but last year wasn't my best offensive year. It was also my first year. I think I was trying to learn a lot of it and we'll see what happens next year."