Philadelphia Flyers

Ranking all 30 GM/coach combos in NHL

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Ranking all 30 GM/coach combos in NHL

In January 2012, I ranked the 30 NHL teams based on the strength of the two most important positions in the franchise: general manager and head coach. In the 19 months since, 13 teams have made organizational changes, but not surprisingly, those hirings and firings have taken place on teams at the bottom of this list.

We’ve celebrated two Stanley Cup champions and endured another lockout, so which team has the top GM/coach combo in the NHL now? Let's break it down:

1. Chicago Blackhawks -- ninth in 2012 (Stan Bowman/Joel Quenneville)
Two Stanley Cup championships in a four-year period. The Chicago Blackhawks have overtaken the Detroit Red Wings as the NHL’s gold standard. Bowman has secured his core players, while adding key contributors like Bryan Bickell who excelled in the postseason. Quenneville is easily one of the league’s top five coaches and has never had a losing year in 16 NHL seasons.

2. Boston Bruins -- second in 2012 (Peter Chiarelli/Claude Julien)
Chiarelli and Julien have been together for six years and have made the playoffs each year including a Stanley Cup in 2011. The team did not skip a beat after goalie Tim Thomas elected to sit out the season. Chiarelli re-signed top center Patrice Bergeron, added Jarome Iginla and traded for Loui Eriksson as part of the biggest blockbuster trade this offseason. Torey Krug and Dougie Hamilton give the franchise a promising future on defense.

3. Detroit Red Wings -- first in 2012 (Ken Holland/Mike Babcock)
The Red Wings fall from the top spot as they continue their transition from the Nicklas Lidstrom era. They remain highly competitive, but they’re simply not in the upper echelon of teams right now. However, the move to the Eastern Conference should give the Wings an easier road through the playoffs, where they have failed to reach the Conference Finals in each of the past four years. Holland and Babcock are both top five on their own merits.

4. Pittsburgh Penguins -- third in 2012 (Ray Shero/Dan Bylsma)
Shero went all-in last season in his effort to bring the Cup back to Pittsburgh by acquiring Iginla, Brendan Morrow, Douglas Murray and Jussi Jokinen in midseason trades. However, the Pens were soundly swept in four straight to the Bruins, scoring just two goals, leaving many to wonder if Bylsma should be back. Instead, Shero extended his coach and locked up Evgeni Malkin and Kris Letang to long-term deals while bringing back Rob Scuderi in one of the league’s best offseason signings.

5. Los Angeles Kings -- 19th in 2012 (Dean Lombardi/Darryl Sutter)
The Kings make the biggest leap after winning the organization’s first Stanley Cup championship in 2012, and reaching the Conference Finals in 2013. Lombardi has one of the league’s top goaltenders in Jonathan Quick and an excellent group of young defensemen around him with Drew Doughty, Slava Voynov and Alec Martinez. Tremendous depth at forward. Sutter took over for Terry Murray in midseason, and the Kings have thrived ever since.

6. Ottawa Senators -- 20th in 2012 (Bryan Murray/Paul MacLean)
MacLean on his own could be top three on this list as he managed to guide the Sens to the postseason despite a rash of injuries to key players, and earned the Jack Adams Award as league’s top coach. At least on the ice, Murray made up for the loss of Daniel Alfredsson by negotiating a trade for Bobby Ryan, who could score 40 goals this season playing alongside a healthy Jason Spezza. Murray also acquired Cory Conacher in a trade with Tampa. Patrick Weircioch is a player on the rise to go along with their dynamic superstar defenseman Erik Karlsson.

7. St. Louis Blues – 13th in 2012 (Doug Armstrong/Ken Hitchcock)
Armstrong has built arguably one of the best blue lines in the entire NHL with youngsters Alex Pietrangelo, Kevin Shattenkirk and the acquisition of Jay Bouwmeester. The team clearly bought into Hitchcock’s defensive-minded system in 2012 when it finished with 109 points while allowing the fewest goals in the league. St. Louis started out slow in the 48-game season before losing out to L.A. in the playoffs.

8. Washington Capitals – 10th in 2012 (George McPhee/Adam Oates)
McPhee almost runs the Capitals like a small-market team, very selective when it comes to free-agent spending. Adam Oates was a solid hire and, after struggling early, the team finally adapted to his system. The Capitals caught fire and finished 15-2-2 to win the Southeast division. More importantly, Oates helped Alex Ovechkin rediscover his superstar form.

9. San Jose Sharks -- sixth in 2012 (Doug Wilson/Todd McLellan)
The Sharks have displayed a remarkable string of regular-season consistency only to underachieve come playoff time. The Joe Thornton/Patrick Marleau tandem is entering their mid-30s, and Wilson seems intent on riding this pair until they can no longer play effectively, and the Sharks have been trending downward as a result. McLellan has maximized the team’s talent, but unlike his predecessors, he’s been unable to advance past the Conference Finals.

10. Phoenix Coyotes -- 14th in 2012 (Dave Maloney/Dave Tippett)
Put this GM/coach combination on a large-market, free-spending team and Maloney and Tippett could have seasons of success. Now that the situation in Phoenix has stabilized, the Coyotes can breathe a little easier. Tippett would have been the No. 1 coaching candidate this summer, but Maloney wisely extended his contract. Tippett has exceeded expectations leading the Coyotes to the Conference Finals in 2012 before missing the postseason in 2013. New ownership should put the organization at ease moving forward.

11. Anaheim Ducks -- 23rd in 2012 (Bob Murray/Bruce Boudreau)
Year on, year off -- that’s been the trend of the Anaheim Ducks, who finished with the third-best record in 2013 after previously missing the playoffs. As a result, Murray locked up his two top players Ryan Getzlaf and Corey Perry to eight-year contracts, and has a stable of talented young players led by Cam Fowler and Jakob Silfverberg. It’s hard to dispute the (regular season) results of Bruce Boudreau, a Jack Adams finalist, who has won a divisional title in the five full seasons he has coached in the league.

12. Toronto Maple Leafs -- eighth in 2012 (Dave Nonis/Randy Carlyle)
It’s hard to assess the work of Nonis, considering he’s now painting with Brian Burke’s palette, but his first major move was bringing in goalie Jonathan Bernier from Los Angeles to help stabilize the team’s situation in net to go along with the big free-agent signing of David Clarkson. Carlyle brought the Leafs back to the postseason for the first time since 2004 with a tough-nosed, gritty attitude and the offseason moves should only complement this team.

13. Vancouver Canucks -- fifth in 2012 (Mike Gillis/John Tortorella)
Gillis has been highly criticized, and rightfully so, for the way he has handled the Roberto Luongo situation. After failing to trade the goaltender, the Canucks' GM instead dealt Cory Schneider to the Devils for a first-round pick. He’ll also have an interesting decision with the Sedins, who are entering the final year of their contracts. Following a first-round sweep to the Sharks, Gillis fired coach Alain Vigneault and replaced him with former Rangers coach Tortorella.

14. Philadelphia Flyers -- fourth in 2012 (Paul Holmgren/Peter Laviolette)
The Flyers fall 10 spots after the Bryz-asterous goaltending saga that resulted in the organization buying out the final seven years of Ilya Bryzagalov’s contract at $23 million. Watching Sergei Bobrovsky win the Vezina Trophy had to sting, as well. The Flyers are one of three teams (Maple Leafs, Blackhawks) to utilize both compliance buyouts this summer. After coming up empty during the 2012 offseason, Holmgren made up for it this summer by signing Vincent Lecavalier, Mark Streit and Ray Emery.

15. New York Rangers -- 12th in 2012 (Glen Sather/Alain Vigneault)
Sather has been at the helm for 13 years now. His best team lost to the Devils in the 2012 Conference Finals. He acquired Rick Nash from Columbus and shipped out Marian Gaborik to the Blue Jackets in a separate deal. Sather replaced Tortorella’s abrasive defensive-minded approach with a more easy-going Vigneault, who should open up the offense which in turn should benefit skill players like Brad Richards and Rick Nash.

16. Nashville Predators – seventh in 2012 (David Poile/Barry Trotz)
The longest-tenured GM/coach combo in the league (together since 1998) finally hit a rough patch in 2013. They fall nine spots after finishing with the second-worst mark in the Western Conference after reaching the playoffs in seven of the previous eight seasons. While Poile matched the Flyers' offer to defenseman Shea Weber and locked up goalie Pekka Rinne, they have done very little to turn around their anemic offense. With Ruff no longer in Buffalo, Trotz is now the longest-tenured coach in the NHL. Last year was his first losing season since 2003.

17. Montreal Canadiens -- 29th in 2012 (Marc Bergevin/Michel Therrien)
The Canadiens finally got it right with the hiring of Bergevin in May 2012, and he has been busy cleaning up the mess created by Pierre Gauthier. To some surprise, he hired former Penguins coach Therrien, who led an overachieving Montreal team to the best record in the Northeast division before losing in the first round of the playoffs. Can they sustain that high level of play over an 82-game season? Max Pacioretty, P.K. Subban, Alex Galchenyuk and Brendan Gallagher comprise a solid nucleus.

18. New Jersey Devils -- 11th in 2012 (Lou Lamoriello/Pete DeBoer)
The Devils drop seven slots even after reaching the Stanley Cup Finals in 2012. They had to forfeit a first-round pick (2014) which could have been a top-10 selection as a result of the contract signed by Ilya Kovalchuk, who’s no longer with the team. Lamoriello replaced David Clarkson by signing Ryan Clowe, seemingly overpaying for the 30-year-old left winger. DeBoer will have a challenge building a playoff-caliber team following Kovalchuk’s sudden departure.

19. New York Islanders -- 28th in 2012 (Garth Snow/Jack Capuano) 
After finishing last in the division for five straight seasons, the Isles returned to the playoffs for the first time since 2007. Snow bought out Rick DiPietro’s mammoth contract. The team lost captain and top defenseman Streit to the Flyers, but they were able to retain goaltender Evgeni Nabokov for one more season. Capuano’s style has really helped Tavares flourish into an elite player.

20. Minnesota Wild -- 25th in 2012 (Chuck Fletcher/Mike Yeo)
Even after spending $196 million on the top two free agents (Zach Parise/Ryan Suter) of 2012, fair to say, the Minnesota Wild are still a marginal team that barely squeaked into the playoffs during the final week of the shortened season. Fletcher also gave up a lot to acquire Jason Pominville and the Wild were manhandled by the Blackhawks in the first round of the playoffs. This is a crucial season for Yeo, and a change could be made if Minnesota struggles early.

21. Dallas Stars -- 17th in 2012 (Jim Nill/Lindy Ruff)
Dallas is the first rodeo for Nill, who spent a majority of his front-office career helping construct the Red Wings' dynasty. He made his first major move by acquiring Tyler Seguin from the Boston Bruins, and if Seguin can commit to being a pro, this could be a great swap for Dallas. Ruff was the NHL’s longest-tenured coach until he was cut loose last season in Buffalo. Together, Nill and Ruff could be the perfect pair to get this franchise back to the postseason for the first time in six years.

22. Winnipeg Jets -- 26th in 2012 (Kevin Cheveldayoff/Claude Noel)
The honeymoon is wearing off as Cheveldayoff has taken a patient approach since the team moved to Winnipeg in 2011. The Jets have missed out on postseason play in their first two years, but they have a good crop of young players to build around with Zach Bogosian, Evander Kane and Blake Wheeler, plus Captain Andrew Ladd. The Jets still allow too many goals. As a franchise, they need to turn a corner or the passionate fan base in Winnipeg will grow impatient. Noel has been the Jets' only coach and has yet to guide this team to the playoffs.

23. Florida Panthers -- 15th in 2012 (Dale Tallon/Kevin Dineen)
Perhaps no team struggled more through the lockout-shortened season than the Florida Panthers, who went from Southeast division champs in Dineen’s first season to worst record in the NHL. The 2013-14 season should be a better indicator of where this franchise stands. It’s time for Jacob Markstrom to take that next step and prove why the organization passed on acquiring Luongo.  

24. Buffalo Sabres -- 16th in 2012 (Darcy Reiger/Ron Rolston)
Reiger has held his current post for 16 years now and perhaps it’s time for a change. The Sabres have missed the playoffs in four of the last six years. Ville Leino has proven to be a bust, and defenseman Tyler Myers has regressed from his rookie season. Outside of Thomas Vanek and Cody Hodgson, the Sabres are thin at forward. Rolston did an admirable job after replacing Lindy Ruff in midseason as the Sabres finished 15-11-5 under the new coach.

25. Tampa Bay Lightning -- 18th in 2012 (Steve Yzerman/Jon Cooper) 
It appears Yzerman has made some decent moves over the past few years, it just hasn’t come together for the Lightning. They’ve missed the playoffs the past two years after reaching Game 7 of the Conference Finals in 2011. Yzerman bought out the remaining seven years on Vincent Lecavalier’s contract and signed Valtteri Filppula as a cheaper alternative. Cooper is a proven AHL coach having won a Calder Cup, but turning around Tampa Bay will be a big challenge.   

26. Columbus Blue Jackets -- 30th in 2012 (Jarmo Kekalainen/Todd Richards)
The Blue Jackets ranked dead last and appeared to be going nowhere, but credit former GM Scott Howson for acquiring Bobrovsky and giving this team the building blocks with three first-round picks. Kekalainen has made some bold moves, acquiring Marion Gaborik from New York and signing free-agent Nathan Horton. The Jackets still need a legitimate No. 1 center. In his first full season, Richards nearly guided Columbus to the franchise’s second playoff appearance.  

27. Carolina Hurricanes -- 24th in 2012 (Jim Rutherford/Kirk Muller) 
Carolina has failed to reach the playoffs now in four straight years, and that goal will only get tougher moving into the new Metropolitan Division. Is Jordan Staal really worth $60 million over 10 years? How about Alex Semin, who was locked up for $35 million over five years? Rutherford continues to dump money up front when his defense, outside of Justin Faulk, needs an overhaul.

28. Colorado Avalanche -- 21st in 2012 (Joe Sakic*/Patrick Roy) 
The Avalanche want to return to the glory days, so they brought the glory days back with Sakic and Roy, and while they are two of the best guys on the ice, there’s no proof they can produce those same results off of it. Even though Greg Sherman remains GM, clearly Sakic is in charge of making all personnel decisions as the organization’s executive vice president of hockey operations. There’s potential with youngsters Gabriel Landeskog, Matt Duchene and Ryan O’Reilly.

29. Calgary Flames -- 22nd in 2012 (Jay Feaster/Bob Hartley)
The face of the franchise is gone, and Feaster, who won the Cup as GM in Tampa, has yet to make any quality moves to inject life into this team. He made a futile attempt to try and sign Colorado restricted free agent Ryan O’Reilly. The Flames are more of a flicker entering this season and already have the look of a team that will miss the playoffs for a fifth straight season. The Flames finished 13th in the Western Conference in Hartley’s first season in Calgary.

30. Edmonton Oilers -- 27th in 2012 (Craig MacTavish/Dallas Eakins) 
Despite having the first pick in the 2010, 2011 and 2012 drafts, the Edmonton Oilers have barely budged their way up the standings. They lack toughness and grit and the result has been seven straight years without a playoff appearance. Former GM Steve Tambellini was fired in the offseason and replaced by MacTavish, who needs to give this franchise a much-needed identity. Eakins has the daunting task of trying to mesh a lot of young, unproven talent.

End to End: Jaromir Jagr is still available … Flyers?

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End to End: Jaromir Jagr is still available … Flyers?

Throughout the offseason, we’ll ask questions about the Flyers to our resident hockey analysts and see what they have to say.

Going End to End today are CSNPhilly.com reporters John Boruk, Tom Dougherty, Jordan Hall and Greg Paone.

The topic: Jaromir Jagr is still available … Flyers?

Boruk
It’s extremely rare for Philadelphia to have this endearing loyalty to any athlete following a one-year love affair, but from Day 1, Jagr connected with hockey fans on South Broad. He had the hair, the smile, the occasional salute, his tireless dedication to his craft, but there was more to it than that.

Understand one of the biggest reasons Jagr is so revered in Philadelphia was his decision to spurn the Penguins at the last minute to sign with the Flyers. He rejected old friend and former teammate Mario Lemieux so he could join their most heated rival. You just can’t buy that level of respect and admiration!

Playing on a line with Claude Giroux and Scott Hartnell for much of that 2011-12 season, Jagr turned in a respectable 54-point season. That trio clicked for the first three months of the season, but Jagr started to fade after December as he re-acclimated his body and conditioning to the NHL’s 82-game schedule, which came four years after his last season in the NHL with the Rangers. He also struggled to contribute in the playoffs with one goal in the Flyers' 11 postseason games.

Since that season, Jagr has bounced around the league, playing for four different teams since 2012 — the Stars, Bruins, Devils and Panthers. His act would play perfectly on the Vegas strip, and Jagr has proven he can still contribute into his mid-40s. He’s recorded 30 assists in each of the past four seasons — a total that only 35 other players have achieved.

At the very least, Jagr deserves to outlast the NHL career of Chris Chelios, who played seven games for the Atlanta Thrashers at the age of 48.

If this Flyers team needs Jaromir Jagr to reach the playoffs again, then it's in some serious trouble. After further thought, why not bring Jagr in on a training camp invite, if anything, to make training camp fun again? He could fill our smartphones and tape recorders with quotes for half a season. He could mentor the prospects and put a smile on Little Mario (his nickname for Giroux). In fact, I could probably sway Jagr to return with little more than a gift card to Costco. He took $2 million for one year to join the Devils and then proceeded to score 24 goals and 67 points in 2014. If Ron Hextall was so inclined, he could sign Jagr at a 50 percent discount. One million dollars for one season would get it done.

Dougherty 
Flyers GM Hextall vehemently downplayed the idea of signing Jagr, or any other veteran free agent that would block the youth movement, on July 2. “Not the direction we're going in,” he said then. But as we enter the dog days of the NHL summer, Jagr remains without an NHL contract.

I don’t believe signing Jagr would fit into the Flyers’ plans. It doesn’t align with how Hextall runs his operations, and Hextall is on the record saying Jagr isn’t where he’s headed. But. How Jagr still doesn’t have a contract baffles me. He’s still productive and would improve any team that signs him. He would be an instant upgrade to the Flyers. There’s no doubt.
 
Perhaps the biggest roadblock as to why Jagr remains unsigned is the role he wants and the role NHL teams believe he’s capable of handling as he turns 46 in February. Last season, Jagr scored 16 goals and 46 points for the Florida Panthers, who have moved on from the future Hall of Famer. Those 46 points would have ranked sixth on the Flyers, and his 16 goals would have ranked fourth on the team — ahead of team captain Giroux’s 14.

Jagr remains in phenomenal shape. His workout regimen is one of legend. But as he approaches 50 years old, there’s no denying he wears down as the season goes on. That’s been the story the last few seasons in Florida, where he’s been ever so productive but has worn down. Perhaps Jagr realizes this, perhaps NHL teams realize this too.

Perhaps we’re making too much of the fact that Jagr remains unsigned. Could he decide to head back to the KHL, where he could be guaranteed a large role? I think that is very much a realistic possibility at this point in time. But I also believe teams could prefer waiting to sign Jagr, rather than bringing him in for the start of the season. I could see teams waiting out as long as possible before offering Jagr a contract enticing enough for him to sign.

And perhaps Jagr is OK with this too. It is astonishing to see him unsigned — I still think he belongs in the NHL and that he can still play, and play at a high level too. In the end, I do think we’ll see Jagr in the NHL again this season — when and where is the question.

I don’t think it will be the Flyers. But the obvious answer is: Yes, Hextall and the Flyers should consider Jagr. Every NHL team should. Because at 45 years old, Jaromir Jagr is still a very productive player and he will make an impact anywhere he goes.

Hall
Albeit an interesting thought and a bit more intriguing now with Jagr still out there, my answer is the same as when we discussed a possible Hartnell reunion.

No.

Jagr can still play — maybe he could help the Flyers in a few areas, both tangibly and intangibly.

But this season should be about taking a step forward by injecting more youth into the equation. The Flyers finally have some opportunity for prospects to make the jump and start their NHL development. And the kids are expected to make an impact, too. 

Last season, we saw the positives of having youngsters in Ivan Provorov and Travis Konecny. This season, it's time for many more. Hextall even acknowledged that just four days after the 2016-17 regular season ended.

"Our young players, they've done enough," he said. "Our young players are going to get a long look. We don't plan on going out and signing veterans on the back end. Our kids, it's time to give them a shot, and we're going to do that."

If the Flyers wanted to sign Jagr, it would obviously be for one season. Still, that's one season of blockading a forward prospect from being here or playing meaningful minutes — someone like Mike Vecchione or Scott Laughton (yes, he's still a prospect and worth watching). Or, it could even change a lot for the likes of Oskar Lindblom and Nolan Patrick.

As fun as it would be to see Jagr back in Philadelphia, the answer here is an easy no.

Paone
With all due respect to Jagr (and he's an absolute legend who's due a lot of it), that ship has sailed here in Philadelphia.

Let's weigh this out here: What could a soon-to-be 46-year-old Jagr bring to this group of Flyers?

Sure, he could bring that invaluable leadership and example to the Flyers that was so important during the 2011-12 season. Remember the effect he had that year alongside Giroux, who ran wild across the league with a career-high 93 points? A handful goals and points here and there from Jagr would always be helpful, too.

But no way does that stuff outweigh eating up a roster space for a young player who's ready for a taste of the NHL level and using any precious cap space on the oldest player in the league rather than keeping more of the already slim flexibility the Flyers have.

Hextall's vision is all about the youth and development from within. That's the focus of the club from top to bottom right now. Needless to say, Jagr doesn't come anywhere close to fitting that vision or focus. I doubt Jagr has ever even popped up on Hextall's radar this summer. Want proof? During a conference call earlier in the summer, Hextall was asked about Jagr and emphatically slammed the door shut on that idea in not so many words, as Tom mentioned above.

The fact of the matter here is the Flyers just don't have a spot on the roster or a role for him — Jagr never has been and never will be a fourth-line player. Why even consider him if there's no roster spot, no role, he doesn't fit the vision the team has molded for itself and if cap space is at a premium? Why even waste the energy or breath?

Do I feel Jagr will get picked up before the season starts? Yeah, I do, by a team closer to a legitimate Stanley Cup contender that's looking for some veteran punch. And he'll make an impact because that's just what a legend like him does.

That team just isn't the Flyers.

Sorry to burst your bubble.

End to End: Should the Flyers pursue David Pastrnak?

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End to End: Should the Flyers pursue David Pastrnak?

Throughout the offseason, we’ll ask questions about the Flyers to our resident hockey analysts and see what they have to say.

Going End to End today are CSNPhilly.com reporters John Boruk, Tom Dougherty, Jordan Hall and Greg Paone.

The topic: Should the Flyers pursue David Pastrnak?

Boruk
Who wants a 21-year-old winger coming off a 34-goal, 70-point season in his first full year in the NHL? 

Sure, where do I sign up? I see, right below the names of the league’s 31 general managers.

I came across NHL Network analyst Brian Lawton’s tweet earlier in the week, when he mentioned that the Bruins may be looking at a trade as a possibility. That may be the case, but the probability is, I think, extremely low.

However, Boston has a history of shipping out top-end talent at a very early age. Phil Kessel was sent to Toronto following a 36-goal season, and Tyler Seguin was part of a blockbuster deal with Dallas in 2013. Both Kessel and Seguin were 21 years of age, which is unimaginable how one organization could part ways with such prized prospects at such an early age. In the case of Seguin, the B’s didn’t receive nearly the compensation from the Stars to justify the swap. Eventually, an organization has to learn from its previous mistake(s).

With that said, Pastrnak is an RFA and his options are limited: sign with the Bruins or demand a trade to another team. As Bruins Insider for CSN New England Joe Haggerty points out, the Bruins would demand a proven player, who will be under club control for the next several years. Haggerty mentioned Blue Jackets defenseman and Calder Trophy finalist Zach Werenski as an equitable return, or something close. Werenski was drafted eighth overall in 2015. Care to recall who the seventh player selected was? Ivan Provorov. How would you feel trading your future shutdown defenseman for the next decade as the starting point to acquire Pastrnak? Doesn’t have much appeal to me. Regardless of how well-stocked the organization is with defensive prospects, Provorov is a special talent and the Flyers don’t have another one quite like him.

I’ve seen this scenario before with other RFAs when Bobby Ryan was in Anaheim, and more recently, with Johnny Gaudreau and the Flames a few years back. Those two players continued their stalemate right up to training camp before hammering out long-term deals. Unlike the NFL, hockey players simply don’t like the idea of contract talks becoming a disruption just before the season begins. That’s how I think the Pastrnak scenario will eventually play out with him signing a multi-year extension somewhere in the $6-7 million range.

Dougherty
Last Monday afternoon, Lawton, an NHL Network analyst, former player, agent and general manager of the Tampa Bay Lightning, dropped a bombshell into the Twittersphere.

And so began the prospect of Boston losing yet another young stud.

Bruins general manager Don Sweeney attempted to throw cold water on the rumors Tuesday. Sweeney told The Boston Globe in an email that he’s “not trading Pastrnak.”

OK, end of story.

Right?

Until Pastrnak signs his name on a new contract in Boston, we cannot count out the Bruins trading the 21-year-old right winger. Not with the recent history of Beantown.

First, it was Kessel. The Bruins couldn’t sign Kessel to an extension after his entry-level deal expired. They traded him to Toronto for two first-round picks and a second-rounder.

Then, it was Seguin. Whether it was immaturity issues with the then-21-year-old Seguin or his underwhelming postseason performance, we don’t know why, but the Bruins traded Seguin and he has since become a star in Dallas.

And then there is Dougie Hamilton, who was traded to Calgary after the Bruins failed to sign him long term.

(Interesting nugget: The Bruins drafted Seguin and Hamilton with the two first-round picks acquired in the Kessel trade.)

Back to Pastrnak. Sweeney would be incompetent as a GM to openly suggest trading Pastrnak is an option. The two sides appear to be locked in a stalemate, and for the Bruins, the recent contract extension the Edmonton Oilers signed Leon Draisaitl to is bad news. This could very well go into training camp. The end game could be Pastrnak signing a long-term contract with the Bruins. You think it’s a must-do for Sweeney.

The Flyers should absolutely keep tabs on the Pastrnak situation because he would be an ideal fit here. He’s a 21-year-old scorer with a 70-point season to his name already. He should only get better. I’m quite the conservative type when it comes to sports, and with the Flyers, believed by many, having the top prospect pipeline in the league, usually, I’d suggest staying on course. But Pastrnak is the type of guy you have to consider paying for.

I don’t know what the asking price for Pastrnak would be, but it would cost Ron Hextall a lot. Probably first-round draft picks and prospects. Maybe even an NHL player, too. The thought of adding Pastrnak to a young forward group of Nolan Patrick, Travis Konecny, Oskar Lindblom, Sean Couturier and Jordan Weal is quite enticing, though. If he hits the trade market, the Flyers should be aggressive in pursuit of the Czech winger.

Hall
We're not sure if Pastrnak is being shopped whatsoever.

As Tom pointed out, Sweeney shot down the trade rumor pretty succinctly. And why would Boston even think of dangling Pastrnak on the market? This is a kid that at 20 years old, produced 70 points (34 goals, 36 assists) last season, good to be the second-leading scorer on a playoff team.

So sending Pastrnak out of Beantown would make little sense. Yes, he's still an unresolved RFA, but you'd think the Bruins would do whatever it takes to eventually get something done.

However, if Boston is actually contemplating the trade route here, the Flyers would be silly to not listen or make a call. One purpose of building organizational depth is to create flexibility for ways to improve.

The Flyers now have the prospects to be an attractive player in trade fields, if they so choose. Obviously, you don't want to throw away the farm, and the Flyers won't.

Pastrnak, though, is a stud 21-year-old goal-scoring winger. The Flyers would be naïve to have no interest in such a burgeoning talent.

With that said, this seems like a fantasy. I don't see Pastrnak being anywhere but Boston in 2017-18.

Paone
Absolutely. 

The Flyers should be all in on Pastrnak if he really is available and Hextall should be burning up the phone lines to talk Sweeney's ear off.

Pastrnak is exactly what the Flyers need and what they've lacked for years on end now — a young, dynamic winger who can just pile pucks into the net in the blink of an eye.

The Czech native, who just turned 21 this past May, has 59 goals already in his blossoming NHL career. And he's coming off a superb first full campaign as he potted 34 goals in 75 games last season. He's a maven on the power play, too, as he scored 10 while on the man advantage last season. 

Just imagine the things Pastrnak could do on the Flyers' top-line wing, which is where he would immediately be slotted. Imagine what he could do for a Flyers team that finished in the bottom third of the league with 2.59 goals per game.

Good thoughts, gang. Good thoughts.

But here's the thing — youthful, ultra-talented scorers like Pastrnak don't just grow on trees. If they did, every general manager in the league would shimmy up the tree themselves and pluck them off the branches in bunches to take back home.

Needless to say, that's not how it works. 

The Bruins' price tag to acquire Pastrnak will be steep. And rightfully so. Why should they just give him away?

But the Flyers have the reserves that could raise Sweeney's eyebrows.

The Flyers' farm system is so deep and stocked that it was named the top farm system in the league earlier this week by ESPN. And the fact of the matter is not all of those prospects will ever wear orange and black. The farm system not only helps improve the club from within, but it also gives Hextall and the Flyers the ability to be flexible and tap into those reserves and make exterior moves to help improve the club. This would be one of those times. 

What would it take to get Pastrnak south down I-95 to Philadelphia? Just spitballing here, but think a top prospect (maybe two), a high draft pick and a young, NHL-ready player. So let's say Travis Sanheim/Sam Morin (or both), a first-round pick and Weal. Again, just a shot in the dark with a guess there. The Flyers' untouchables should be Provorov (duh), Shayne Gostisbehere, Konecny, Patrick, German Rubtsov and Carter Hart. Anyone else I'd be at least willing to listen on. 

Poaching the organizational depth and handing over draft picks isn't Hextall's traditional way of doing business. But there are extenuating circumstances sometimes. And a deal for Pastrnak would be one of those times.