Will Kimmo Timonen pick retirement or Flyers?

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Will Kimmo Timonen pick retirement or Flyers?

VOORHEES, N.J. -- Kimmo Timonen has been thinking about it for a while. 

It was on his mind long before the Flyers clinched a playoff spot, and long before the New York Rangers cut his season short.

The veteran defenseman’s contract, a one-year deal worth $6 million that he signed after last year’s lockout-shortened season, is up. He’s now at a crossroads, forced to choose whether to return for a final year or hang up his skates for good. 

At 39, he’s already lasted years longer than most defensemen -- especially most defensemen his size. He has a lot to be proud of when looking back on his 15-year NHL career. But he isn’t yet ready to make a decision about his future.

“I’m going to take a few weeks here and see how I feel,” Timonen said. “I feel like, injury-wise, I’m in pretty good shape. It’s not like I can say, ‘OK, I have to go do this surgery’ and that kind of stuff, but I’m going to take my time here and see. 

“You have to be motivated to work out, get into shape, go through those 82 games again, and for myself, I put the highest standard for where I want to be when I play the game. I have to think about if I can still be there, and if I find that I can be there, then I don’t see why I’m not coming back.”

Timonen still has plenty to play for. He’s a five-time All-Star who, despite appearing in 1,092 NHL games, has never won a Stanley Cup. That drove him to return for 2013-14, and might just be enough to pull him back next season, too.

And if he does return to the league, he’ll return to the Flyers. Coach Craig Berube said after the Flyers’ Game 7 loss to the Rangers that he wants Timonen to return. General manager Paul Holmgren wants him back, too, but leaves the decision up to Timonen entirely (see story).

Holmgren said he’s happy to give Timonen as much time as he needs to decide whether he wishes to return, but would ideally like to know before the draft, June 27-28. The two have already had a conversation about it. Timonen expects to have his mind made up within the month.

“This is my place,” Timonen said. “If I get back here, this is where I want to be. I like our team. I like the team moving forward because we can get some young guys, young forwards, who can be faster. 

“I won’t get any younger, that’s for sure, and probably not faster, but I feel like I can still help the team. But again, I want to take my time and see if I can get to the level that I want to be.”

Timonen would most likely return for a lesser salary and a lesser role, if he chooses to play next year. He averaged 20:20 on the ice this season as part of the Flyers’ top pairing, but would likely take a cut in ice time and responsibility.

The issue, though, is that right now the idea of coming back another full season is exhausting. There’s the offseason training regimen, training camp and 82 regular-season games before he’d even have the chance to play in the postseason -- if the Flyers make it at all.

It’s a grind, and he knows it.

“It feels hard now, because it’s going to be another 10 months to get the point where we were,” Timonen said. “It’s a long way, so we’ll see."

Timonen elected to return for this season because he couldn’t bear retiring after a 48-game season. It wasn’t about making more money or earning any new honors. He wanted a chance to fight for the Stanley Cup.

Should he return for 2014-15, what drives him to succeed will be exactly the same.

“This year coming in, I wanted to make the playoffs and play well,” he said. “And we made the playoffs, but exited in the first round, and I’m still missing the Stanley Cup. That’s something that’s still in my mind. 

“Let’s put it this way: If I won the Stanley Cup earlier, I probably wouldn’t be here and talking to you guys. I would say, ‘OK, that’s it.’ But I haven’t won it. That’s the only thing that keeps the hopes up. It’s not money, it’s not anything else. It’s the Stanley Cup.”

Best of NHL: Rickard Rakell, Ducks snap Bruins' win streak at 4

Best of NHL: Rickard Rakell, Ducks snap Bruins' win streak at 4

ANAHEIM, Calif. -- Rickard Rakell broke a tie with his second goal with 2:34 to play, and the Anaheim Ducks snapped Boston's four-game winning streak under new coach Bruce Cassidy with a 5-3 victory over the Bruins on Wednesday night.

Rakell also scored in the second period for the Ducks and has 24 goals in his outstanding season. Ondrej Kase, Josh Manson and Andrew Cogliano also scored for Anaheim, and Jonathan Bernier made 26 saves in his first victory since Jan. 23.

Frank Vatrano scored the tying goal in the third period for the Bruins, who hadn't lost since Cassidy replaced Claude Julien on Feb. 7. Defensemen Brandon Carlo and Zdeno Chara scored early goals, and Tuukka Rask stopped 20 shots.

Anaheim beat Boston for the seventh straight time (see full recap).

Rare goal from Russell lifts Oilers over Panthers
SUNRISE, Fla. -- Kris Russell's goal with 7:58 left was his first in more than a year and lifted the Edmonton Oilers over Florida 4-3 on Wednesday night to snap the Panthers' five-game winning streak.

Russell's goal was his first since Feb. 11, 2016, when he played for Calgary. He went goalless in his first 48 games with the Oilers.

Fellow defenseman Oscar Klefbom also scored for Edmonton, as did forwards Zack Kassian and Ryan Nugent-Hopkins. Connor McDavid, who came into the night leading the NHL scoring race, had an assist on Russell's goal.

Aleksander Barkov, Colton Sceviour and Jonathan Marchessault scored for Florida. Keith Yandle had two assists for the Panthers, giving him 400 points for his career.

Cam Talbot stopped 31 shots for the Oilers, who have won their last eight games at Florida -- last losing on the Panthers' ice in 2002. James Reimer made 31 saves for the Panthers, who just completed a 5-0-0 road trip (see full recap).

Another solid effort for Flyers not enough in loss to NHL-best Capitals

Another solid effort for Flyers not enough in loss to NHL-best Capitals

BOX SCORE

You see it in their faces. Feel it in their voices.
 
And you wonder how it affects them night after night.
 
The Flyers played another pretty solid loss, as they say, Wednesday night against the Washington Capitals at Wells Fargo Center.
 
A lot closer than 4-1 makes it appear (see Instant Replay). It was a lot like that solid loss last week in Calgary, too.
 
“Maybe a little bit similar,” coach Dave Hakstol said. “Our effort was good start to finish. There’s always a couple mistakes you make you want to clean up and do better. I thought tonight we had more opportunities than we did in the Calgary game.”
 
They had more goals, too. Except two got taken away.
 
One for goalie interference. The other hit the crossbar and even after a long celebration and delay, was ruled no good.
 
That’s been the Flyers’ no-luck this season. It’s all gone wrong for them as their wild-card aspirations slip further away.
 
“It’s very frustrating,” team captain Claude Giroux said. “Same story. We need to find a way here. We say the same thing after each game. I like the way we’re playing.
 
“We played a good hockey game, not good enough. We have a challenge in front of us. In the past, we’ve been a team that doesn’t back down. We have to keep our heads high and battling.”
 
The Flyers had the right approach, coming out fast and aggressive on the Caps. In fact, Jakub Voracek scored 23 seconds into the game during a net scrum.
 
Thing was, Caps coach Barry Trotz correctly saw goalie interference as Dale Weise actually pushed Braden Holtby aside. It was an easy coach’s challenge to overturn the goal and that’s what happened.
 
Weise was beside himself after the game.
 
“What I was trying to do was brace myself so I didn’t bowl him over and it comes back the other way,” Weise said.
 
“I don’t know what else to do there. I’m trying to poke the puck with one hand and brace myself so I don’t hit him.”
 
Naturally, six minutes later, Brandon Manning turned a puck over along the boards with T.J. Oshie and Alex Ovechkin and it resulted in Nick Backstrom getting a great setup in the high slot for a 1-0 Caps’ lead.
 
“Even after that, we came back and played well and had good chances,” Weise said. “It’s the same story every night. We don’t capitalize on it and give up a few chances and they score on their opportunities.”
 
That’s when frustration seeped in on the Flyers and the penalties began to mount. Sean Couturier tried to get away with an elbow. Didn’t work.
 
The Caps dazzled the Flyers with brilliant puck movement, culminating with Evgeny Kuznetsov’s goal to make it 2-0 at 16:28. He had two goals in the game.
 
While that could have ruined them, the Flyers came out hard in the second as Ivan Provorov appeared to score in the opening minute. However, replay confirmed his shot hit the crossbar. Two near-goals for the Flyers.
 
“I shot it and saw that [the puck] went up and I didn’t hear a sound,” Provorov said. “I thought it went in.”
 
No matter. Manning atoned for his first-period miscue by saving a puck from leaving the zone and then firing on net where Brayden Schenn scored a rare five-on-five goal by batting the puck out of the air to cut the Flyers’ deficit in half.
 
Of Schenn’s 19 goals, 14 have come on the power play.
 
Giroux’s line with Schenn and Wayne Simmonds consisted of the Flyers’ only players on the right side of the plus-minus category. And to show how deceiving that can be, Voracek worked his tail off, too, but was minus-3.
 
That’s how it goes these days for this group.
 
“It’s been a lot of games where it’s been one- or two-goal hockey games and it’s tough to do,” Schenn said. “We’re generating shots, but I don’t know if we’re generating enough chances.
 
“At the end of the day, you feel you play hard and a pretty good hockey game and end up scoring one goal again. Whether it’s 3-1, 4-1, you score one goal, you won’t win many hockey games.”
 
The Flyers are 3-6-1 since coming out of the All-Star break. Of those seven total losses, including overtime, they have scored more than one goal just once.
 
“We’ve got to rise above it, each and every one of us,” Hakstol said. “Get back at it. And that is what this group has continually done. We have to do that one more time here.”