Adams has 3 tears in shoulder, season likely over

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Adams has 3 tears in shoulder, season likely over

Updated: 10:01 p.m.

SAN DIEGO -- Phillies reliever Mike Adams has most likely thrown his last pitch of the 2013 season.
 
“Not good,” he said after having his right shoulder examined in Los Angeles on Tuesday. “I’ve got some tears in there -- rotator cuff and labrum.”
 
Adams said a course of remedy had not yet been established. He could have surgery or opt for a strength and rehab program that would require up to 12 weeks. Either way, he figures his season is over.
 
“This season doesn't look good — highly unlikely,” he said. “This year is almost probably a no.”
 
Adams, 34, signed a two-year, $12 million contract in the offseason. He had an MRI before the signing and that showed no surprises, according to Adams and the Phillies.
 
"They had to have happened not too long ago," Adams said of the tears.
 
Adams was supposed to be the guy that fixed the leaky eighth inning that plagued the Phillies last year. Even though he’s been inconsistent this season, his loss is a punch in the gut to a club that has the worst bullpen ERA in the majors at 4.68.
 
“It hurts,” GM Ruben Amaro Jr. said. “It’s a big blow to us.”
 
Adams experienced shoulder problems several weeks ago and had another MRI this past weekend. According to Adams, the MRI showed three tears -- two in the labrum and one on the rotator cuff. The tears were confirmed by surgeon Neal ElAttrache during an exam in Los Angeles on Tuesday. ElAttrache operated on Roy Halladay's shoulder last month.
 
If Adams opts for surgery, his recovery time won’t be known until doctors get a look at the damage inside his shoulder. His best chance of being ready for the start of next season might be the more conservative rehab route. That is what Phillies team doctors have recommended.
 
“We’re going to try to figure out what’s best over the next couple of days,” Adams said. “It’s not going to heal. Maybe I can do some stuff to get the other muscles to take over and strengthen and hold everything else intact.”
 
Adams had a previous tear in his labrum. It was repaired surgically in 2008. He also had surgery last fall to correct thoracic outlet syndrome. Doctors removed the rib under his collarbone to alleviate pressure in his shoulder and improve circulation and feeling in his fingers.
 
The Phillies say they did their due diligence on Adams’ health history and believed he was worth signing.
 
“The feeling for us was that, yeah, he’s a risk just like any other veteran guy who’s been around the block a lot,” Amaro said. “There was some added risk because he was coming off a surgery, but his rehab went very well and he didn’t have any complaints or his issues with the thoracic outlet syndrome. This is the stuff that happens. You can’t do anything about it.”
 
Amaro said he had feelers out with other clubs, but the price for relievers was so high he expected to fill the hole in the bullpen in-house (see story).

Phillies tender contracts to 3 players as Cody Asche becomes free agent

Phillies tender contracts to 3 players as Cody Asche becomes free agent

The Phillies tendered contracts to three arbitration-eligible players on Friday night and set another free.
 
Reliever Jeanmar Gomez and infielders Cesar Hernandez and Freddy Galvis were tendered contracts for the 2017 season while outfielder Cody Asche was let go after four seasons with the club. 
 
The Phillies signaled their intention to let Asche go when they designated him for assignment, a move that removed him from the 40-man roster, on Friday afternoon. The club had the option of trading Asche — and likely had discussions with other clubs — but ultimately decided to non-tender him before the 8 p.m. deadline. The move made Asche a free agent.
 
The Phils had removed Asche from the 40-man roster to clear a spot for David Rollins, a left-handed reliever who was claimed off waivers from Texas on Friday (see story)
 
Galvis and Hernandez, the team’s regular shortstop and second baseman, respectively, were certain to receive contracts for 2017. Gomez was less certain. He saved 37 games for the Phils in 2016, but struggled badly late in the season.
 
Phillies officials will try to negotiate 2017 salaries with all three players. If an agreement cannot be reached with a player, an arbitration hearing will be held later in the winter to determine that player’s salary for the coming season.
 
Gomez made $1.4 million in 2016, Galvis $2 million and Hernandez $525,000. According to mlbtraderumors.com, Gomez projects to make $4.6 million in arbitration, Galvis $4.4 million and Hernandez $2.5 million. 

The Phillies' roster is full at 40.

Phillies DFA OF Cody Asche, claim LHP David Rollins off waivers

Phillies DFA OF Cody Asche, claim LHP David Rollins off waivers

Cody Asche's time with the Phillies has come to an end.

The Phillies claimed LHP David Rollins off waivers from the Texas Rangers on Friday. To make room on the 40-man roster, Asche was designated for assignment. The Phillies had until 8 p.m. on Friday to tender a contract to the outfielder, but they instead chose to free up the roster spot for Rollins.

Asche played four seasons with the Phillies from 2013-16 after he was drafted in the fourth round in 2011. The St. Charles, Mo. native had a .213/.284/.350 batting line this past season over 71 games. His best season with the Phillies came as their starting third baseman in 2014, hitting 10 home runs and driving home 46 runs in 121 games.

Rollins has been on four different rosters this offseason. He pitched 31 games in relief for the Seattle Mariners over the last two seasons, sporting a 7.60 ERA over 34 1/3 innings. He was claimed off waivers by the Chicago Cubs 15 days after the World Series and then subsequently claimed again by the Rangers. 

Rollins was a 24th round draft pick by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 2011 MLB Draft and was traded a year later to the Houston Astros. Prior to the 2015 season, the Mariners picked Rollins in the Rule 5 draft after the Astros chose not to protect him.