Amaro blames unwilling trade partners for deadline whiff

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Amaro blames unwilling trade partners for deadline whiff

WASHINGTON -- Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. blamed the rest of baseball, not himself, for his team’s inability to pull off a deal before Thursday’s 4 p.m. non-waiver trade deadline.

“I’m not necessarily disappointed,” he said moments after the deadline. “I’m more surprised that there wasn’t more aggressive action from the other end. We have some pretty good baseball players here. Our goal all along was to try to improve the club and there really wasn’t a deal to be made that would help us do that.”

For weeks, the Phillies made a slew of players available. Need a closer? There was Jonathan Papelbon. A lefty reliever? Antonio Bastardo. A lefty starter? Cliff Lee. A right-handed starter? A.J. Burnett. A power hitter? Marlon Byrd.

They were all still with the Phillies on Thursday night, Lee on the mound against the Washington Nationals, Byrd in right field.

Amaro was adamant that player contracts were not a hindrance to making deals. He stated for the umpteenth time that the team would have eaten salary to get the talent it wanted in return.

That talent was never offered, according to Amaro.

“I just don’t think the players that we were being offered were players who were good enough to help us,” he said.

In national circles, Amaro has been criticized for placing high price tags on his players. Some critics believe his prices were too high for aging players who have been part of a team that is 14 games under .500.

“Well, I would disagree with that,” Amaro said. “In no scenario were we asking for players that were their top prospects. We were not looking for exorbitant paybacks, so to speak. We were looking for players that would help us, but I think we were very reasonable in the discussions that we had. Frankly, I don’t think the clubs were aggressive enough for the talent we have on our club.”

Amaro was pressed on the subject. Could he have been guilty overrating his own talent?

No, Amaro said.

If anything, he added, rival teams are guilty of overrating their prospects.

“In this day and age, I think one of the most over-coveted elements of baseball are prospects,” he said. “I don't know how many prospects that have been dealt over the last several years have really come back to bite people in the ass. I think teams are really kind of overvaluing in some regards.

“When you have players who are actually performing at the major-league level compared to players who are in the minor leagues -- prospects are another term for saying minor-league players. They're minor-league players. And until they're producing at the major-league level, that's what they are. Prospects are prospects.”

Clearly, Amaro believes he was lowballed. He believes that may have been a product of opposing teams viewing the Phillies, a big-market, $180-million-payroll team that is about to whiff on the playoffs for a third straight year, as being desperate.

Amaro conceded that the Phillies need to make changes and he said changes would be made before April, but desperation? No, he said.

“I made it very, very clear that we didn't have any pressure to make deals,” he said. “Our goal was to try and make our club better. If there was a deal to help us get there, we would've done it. There really wasn't a deal we felt comfortable with or a deal that we were going to acquire talent that was compensatory to the talent we offered.”

Amaro said he continued to talk to potential trade partners until 15 minutes before the deadline. The hottest chatter Thursday revolved around Byrd possibly going to the Yankees. The two teams had discussions, but nothing was consummated.

The Phils can still make deals in August. They’ve done them in the past, acquiring Jamie Moyer and Matt Stairs and shipping out Joe Blanton. But August deals require a player first clearing waivers, so that makes things more tricky.

It’s likely the Phils will place Lee, Papelbon, Bastardo, Byrd, Burnett and others on waivers in the coming days -- some might already be there -- just to try to gain trade flexibility for the rest of the season. Given the big money that Lee, Papelbon and Byrd are owed, there is a good chance they would get through waivers so the Phillies could still have the opportunity to make some changes in the coming month.

“I think we have to make changes,” Amaro said. “There's no question about it. We need to get better.”

Phillies-Dodgers 5 things: Nick Pivetta set to debut with Phils reeling

Phillies-Dodgers 5 things: Nick Pivetta set to debut with Phils reeling

Phillies (11-11) at Dodgers (13-12)
4:10 p.m. on CSN; streaming live on CSNPhilly.com and the NBC Sports App

The Phillies suffered what may end up as their most bitter defeat of the season Saturday night. Already with a tenuous hold on the closer spot, Hector Neris gave up back-to-back-to-back homers and took his first loss of the season as the Dodgers scored four in the ninth to upend the Phils.

How will the Phillies respond? They'll send Nick Pivetta to the mound to make his major league debut while the Dodgers toss out veteran LHP Hyun-Jin Ryu.

Here are five things to know for the series finale.

1. O Canada
The 2015 trade of Jonathan Papelbon is about to begin paying off for the Phillies.

Pivetta, a 24-year-old right-hander, will make his MLB debut when he steps on the mound in Sunday's West Coast matinee. Originally from British Columbia, Canada, Pivetta was drafted in the fourth round of the 2013 MLB draft by the Nationals and was traded two years later to the Phillies in exchange for Papelbon, who struggled as the Nationals' closer.

Since the trade, Pivetta has shoved his way quickly through the Phillies' system. In 2016, his first full season with the Phillies' organization, he threw 148 2/3 innings between Double and Triple A and had a 3.27 ERA, limiting hitters to just 7.7 hits per nine innings while fanning 138 batters. He was even more impressive in three starts this season — Pivetta has a 0.95 ERA and three wins in as many starts for Lehigh Valley and has allowed just 15 baserunners in 19 innings. He's struck out 24. His most impressive start was his last appearance, when he threw six innings and struck out 11 on April 20.

Beyond simply performing well, Pivetta earned a call-up thanks to Aaron Nola's injury. Nola's lower-back strain created a need for the Phillies in their rotation and they called upon the 24-year-old Canadian, who was added to the 40-man roster this offseason.

Pivetta was a part of Team Canada in the 2017 World Baseball Classic, starting a game against Colombia in pool play. He lasted four innings and gave up just one run. He earned significant bragging rights within the Phils organization despite Canada losing the game. How? By getting his Triple A battery mate, Jorge Alfaro, out twice in two at-bats. Considering they don't face each other in any other setting, he could hold that over Alfaro for a while.

In Triple A, Pivetta has a small platoon split with lefties hitting him slightly better than righties. However, he struck out lefties at a smaller rate with an inconsistent changeup. Instead, he lives off a mid-90s fastball to pair with his slider and curveball. 

2. Recent Phillies MLB debuts
Pivetta is the first Phillies starter to make his MLB debut this season, just two days after Mark Leiter Jr. became the 18,955th player in MLB history to make his debut. Sunday's game is a bit of uncharted territory for Pivetta, but it's not for the Phillies or even Pete Mackanin. How have some recent debuts played out?

Aaron Nola: Nola had one of the better MLB debuts for a Phillies starter, going six quality innings while allowing just one run in a July 2015 game vs. Tampa Bay. He showed his stuff from the very start and wasn't intimidated by the moment. However, he picked up the loss because the one run he allowed — a home run by the opposing pitcher — was the only run of the game.

Jerad Eickhoff: A month after Nola's debut in 2015, Eickhoff one-upped his new teammate with six shutout innings in Miami. He earned a win while striking out six and allowing just six baserunners. Not bad and a sign of things to come.

Zach Eflin: Eflin had more of a classic MLB debut, a pitcher with the deer in the headlights look. He gave up eight runs and got just eight outs in Toronto last June. He was wiped out of the game after his third home run allowed.

Jake Thompson: Thompson, the most recent of the Phillies' prospects to make his MLB debut, took the hill last August against the Padres. The Friars had his number. He didn't give up any long balls but he surrendered seven hits and two walks over 4 1/3. Thompson garnered just one strikeout in the road loss.

3. Hitting off Ryu
Wins and losses aren't all that indicative of a pitcher's performance. However, it's never a good sign when you lead all of baseball in losses. 

In his age 30 season, Ryu is 0-4 through four starts. The lefty was a stalwart for Hanwha in the Korean Baseball Organization, the top league in his native Korea, and came over to the majors in 2013. He was the No. 2 starter to Clayton Kershaw for two seasons, but things went awry in 2015. He dealt with shoulder issues and missed the entire season, having the labrum repaired in his left shoulder.

It got even worse for Ryu in 2016. He rehabbed the injury and made it back in early July, only to last 4 2/3 innings before dealing with elbow discomfort. He didn't make another start last season and ended with surgery on his left elbow. 

So his early performance is concerning. His velocity is down to barely an average of 90 mph on his fastball. His changeup, slider and curveball have all elicited solid results this season, but his fastball has been obliterated by opposing hitters. All six home runs he's given up in 2017 have been on that fastball, which simply hasn't been fooling hitters and is often in the high 80s.

In total, Ryu has a 4.64 ERA in 21 1/3 innings. He's given up 24 hits and has walked five batters, although he does have 20 strikeouts. Only Freddy Galvis and Jeanmar Gomez have faced Ryu among current Phillies. Galvis is 0 for 3 while, in a shocking twist, Gomez is 1 for 1 with a single. Howie Kendrick, currently on the DL, was Ryu's teammate last season in L.A. 

4. Players to watch
Phillies: Maikel Franco has hit the Dodgers well in his early career (two home runs) and represents a righty-power threat against a soft-tossing lefty. Five of the six home runs Ryu has allowed this season have been to right-handers.

Dodgers: Shortstop Corey Seager was held hitless on Friday, but he has hits in all but six of his 25 starts this year as he carries the Dodgers' offense in the early going. He had a key single on Saturday during the Dodgers' 9th-inning rally.

5. This and that
• Phillies closers have five saves this year and have blown four saves in the ninth inning. The Phillies' five total blown saves are tied for second-most in the majors behind the Blue Jays' eight. Neris' blown save on Saturday night mostly came down to poor pitch location against some powerful hitters. Simply can't afford to make those kinds of mistakes against the Dodgers' lineup.

• After winning five of their first seven road series in 2016, the Phillies have lost three of their first four in 2017. 

• The Phillies won six straight games once last season — April 26-May 1. They proceeded to lose three of four directly following the streak.

• Lefty starters have given the Phillies some trouble this season. Southpaws starting games have limited the Phillies to a .244/.297/.370 batting line with more strikeouts (36) than hits (33) in four games this year. 

Dodgers go boom, boom, boom to burst Phillies' bubble

Dodgers go boom, boom, boom to burst Phillies' bubble

BOX SCORE

LOS ANGELES — For eight innings, it was a wonderful night for the Phillies.

Brock Stassi, the storybook kid, belted a three-run home run. Rookie Andrew Knapp had three hits, including his first big-league home run to give the Phils a three-run lead in the eighth inning, much to the delight of his family and friends whose cheers could be heard rising from deep within the sellout crowd of 53,110. Zach Eflin pitched superbly over seven-walk free innings and even the boys in the dugout had a little fun goofing on Tommy Joseph as he watched the game oblivious to the fact that he had a perfectly formed bubblegum sphere stuck to the top of his cap.

For the Phillies, there were plenty of reasons to be giddy.

And then the bubble burst, turning their happy little night into a crushing, oh-the-humanity, 6-5 loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers (see Instant Replay).

"It's one of the worst losses I've ever been associated with, the way we lost," manager Pete Mackanin, looking shellshocked, said moments after it ended.

Trailing 5-2 entering the bottom of the ninth, the Dodgers tied the game in the blink of an eye when Yasiel Puig, Cody Bellinger and Justin Turner hit consecutive solo home runs off closer-but-don't-call-him-closer Hector Neris.

Puig's homer was a laser into the left-field seats, capping an eight-pitch at-bat. Bellinger's was a shot off the right-field foul pole that electrified the huge crowd. Turner's was a pinch-hit shot to left.

"Those weren't windblown home runs," Mackanin said. "They were bombs. It's tough to take. I'm not real happy with the outcome."

Mackanin removed Neris after a one-out single by Austin Barnes. Lefty Joely Rodriguez came in and got an out, then allowed a two-out single to Corey Seager, bringing No. 3 hitter Adrian Gonzalez to the plate.

With the crowd roaring and the count 1-1, Gonzalez fouled off four straight pitches before hitting a bouncing ball to the left of third baseman Maikel Franco. Franco moved to the ball, but it hit off the end of his glove and bounced wildly as Barnes raced home from second with the winning run.

Gonzalez was awarded an RBI infield hit. But it could have been scored an error.

"I thought [Franco] should have caught it," Mackanin said. "I think he should have [made the play]."

Franco said he could not dive for the ball because it was bouncing so much.

"I was running hard for the ball, but it hit off the tip of my glove," Franco said. "I tried to go out there and do my best on that play. But, you know, I can't get that. I did everything I can on that play."

Really, the game was lost when Neris could not hold the lead. Once the ball started flying out of the park and the crowd started going wild, there was no holding back the Dodgers. They went boom, boom, boom and it was only a matter of time before the Phillies hit the canvas.

In both the macro and micro sense, the Phillies have a problem in the ninth inning.

In the macro, they have blown four saves in the ninth inning, two resulting in painful walk-off losses. The team ERA in the ninth is an appalling 8.83. Neris is the third pitcher to be used as closer (even though Mackanin is reluctant to use the term) and the season isn't even a month old yet.

"I'd like to have a lights-out closer, but we don't have one right now," Mackanin said. "We'll continue to look at it."

In the micro, Neris is still probably best suited for the closer's job, but he needs to make some fixes. Two of the three homers he gave up came on fastballs. Mackanin wants to see more splitters. That pitch helped Neris strike out over 11 batters per nine innings last season.

"One thing about Neris is for some reason he's getting away from his split," Mackanin said. "He wants to throw more fastballs and that's not going to work.

"I think Neris is capable of being a closer, but for some reason, he's just not throwing his split as often as he did and that's his out pitch, the pitch that makes him who he is, who he was, and he's gotten away from it and throwing more fastballs. We'll have a talk with him and get it straightened out."

Neris said pitch selection wasn't his problem in the ninth inning.

"It wasn't because they were fastballs," he said. "It was the location.

"It was just a bad day. Everyone has one."

But this bad?

"What a way to lose," Mackanin groaned. "A real letdown."