Colon stymies Phillies as Dom Brown sits again

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Colon stymies Phillies as Dom Brown sits again

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Bartolo Colon might look more like a Wing Bowl contestant than a major-league pitcher, but he had no trouble with the Phillies Friday night.

In fact, you could say he gobbled them up.

Colon, the rotund 41-year-old right-hander, pitched eight innings of one-run ball in leading the New York Mets to a 5-4 win over the Phillies at Citizens Bank Park (see Instant Replay).

With the victory, Colon became just the third Dominican-born pitcher to reach 200 wins, joining Hall of Famer Juan Marichal (243) and future Hall of Famer Pedro Martinez (219).

Colon served a suspension for testing positive for PEDs in 2012.

The Mets have won 11 of their last 13 games in Philadelphia, dating to last season.

Colon left with a 5-1 lead after eight innings and the Mets’ bullpen nearly coughed up the lead. The Phillies rallied for three runs in the bottom of the ninth. Jenrry Mejia stopped the rally by striking out pinch-hitter Reid Brignac looking at a third strike as the tying run stood on third base.

Grady Sizemore provided the big hit in the ninth, a hard-hit, two-run double off the right-field wall with no outs.

Mets rightfielder Curtis Granderson then made a diving catch on Carlos Ruiz’s sinking liner to save a run. If that ball dropped in, the Phils might have had their second late win in as many nights.

Sizemore’s double was his only hit of the night. He is 28 for 85 (.329) with seven doubles and one home run in 23 games with the Phillies. He has been the Phillies’ starter in left field eight of the last nine games as Domonic Brown’s playing time has shrunk.

Brown, hitting .228 in 107 games, struck out as a pinch-hitter in Friday night’s game. He has been out of the starting lineup nine straight games, though three of those non-starts came over the weekend in Washington when he was being treated for a tonsil infection.

Asked about his health before Friday night’s game, Brown said: “I’m 100 percent. Have been for four days.” Brown was terse and he did not sound happy.

Manager Ryne Sandberg clearly likes what he’s seen of Sizemore. The Phillies swept Houston in the previous three games and Sizemore was right back in left field Friday night.

“Well, you don’t want to mess with something that’s going good, either,” Sandberg said before the game. “Domonic will get another day of batting practice under his belt.

“We'll give (Sizemore) a number of at-bats and see what he looks like for the future. He's part of a lineup that has won three straight, so that's a part of it also."

Phillies starter A.J. Burnett continued his second-half slide. He was tagged for 11 hits and five runs in six innings. His ERA in five starts since the All-Star break is a plump 6.66.

Two of Burnett’s last three starts have been losses to the Mets. In those two starts, he has pitched 11 innings and given up 19 hits and 12 earned runs.

Sandberg said Burnett was falling behind in too many counts and elevating too many pitches.

Burnett, who is 6-12 with a 4.29 ERA in 25 starts, agreed.

“That’s how it’s been the past four starts,” he said. “It’s time to get better. I’m pretty sure they didn’t bring me over here to be like this all year — inconsistent.”

Burnett allowed six hits and four runs in the fourth inning. He was still upset about that after the game. Had he limited the damage in that inning, the Phils’ rally in the ninth might have gone further.

Colon scattered six hits, walked none and struck out six in beating the Phils for the second time in his last three starts. He allowed just one run in 7 2/3 innings against the Phillies on July 28.

So in his last 15 2/3 innings against the Phils, Colon has given up just two runs.

“He has movement on his fastball — cuts it and sinks it,” Sandberg said. “And he changes speeds on his fastball. I think it’s been really hard for our hitters to gauge his fastball. It’s anywhere from 88 to 92 (mph).”

Colon actually hit 94 on the stadium radar gun in the eighth inning.

“He does a good job changing speed with his fastball,” Cody Asche said. “And I think he’s good at reading the hitter, too -- kind of like being a step ahead. I think that’s why he’s survived so long in this game and done so well. He’s tough.”

Instant Replay: Mets 17, Phillies 0

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Instant Replay: Mets 17, Phillies 0

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NEW YORK — This time, there was no lead for the Phillies’ bullpen to blow.

Sunday, the Mets tagged five Phillies relievers for 14 runs in a 17-0 demolition and won the four-game series. 

The Phillies only recorded three hits against Robert Gsellman, a rookie righthanded starter who stands to play a large role in the Mets’ injury-ravaged rotation down the stretch.

The Mets — for now — regained control of the first wild card spot in the NL. They had entered Sunday tied in the standings with the Giants. The Giants’ game against the Padres had no score when the Mets’ game concluded. The Cardinals sit a half-game back of both teams. Their game against the Cubs does not begin until 8:08 p.

The Phillies fell to 70-86.

Players from the Mets and Phillies both poured out of the dugouts for a pregame moment of silence in honor of Marlins ace Jose Fernandez, who died early Sunday morning in a boating accident at the age of 24.

Starting pitching report
Jake Thompson showed life on his changeup, a pitch he has struggled to wield effectively since his August arrival in the majors. He ran into trouble in the second inning when he surrendered a double to Jay Bruce on a middle-in fastball and a single to T.J. Rivera, but escaped with only one run in damage after inducing James Loney into an easy double play.

He nearly imploded in the fourth, surrendering a solo homer to Curtis Granderson to lead off the inning and then walking Jose Reyes with the bases loaded and two out to force in a run. Thompson elicited a popout to left from Asdrubal Cabrera to end the bases-loaded scenario, but that was the end of his afternoon.

Gsellman erased the rough memories of his first major league start, a 5-1 defeat to the Phillies at Citi Field on Aug. 28 in which he surrendered four runs on five hits and was pulled in the seventh inning.

He struck out eight batters in seven shutout innings. Gsellman only ran into trouble in the first inning when he faced a runners-on-the-corners, two-out situation in the top of the first. He promptly got Ryan Howard to ground out to first base.

Gsellman even managed to reach base with a bunt single in the third despite not being able to swing a bat due to a labrum tear in his non-throwing shoulder.

Bullpen report
Phil Klein made his first appearance since being called up for the second time on Sept. 10. He had been dealing with elbow soreness. Klein only retired one batter in the fifth and surrendered two runs on two walks, two singles and a pitch that hit Rene Rivera in the left hand. He departed with the bases still loaded.

Colton Murray entered to clean up the mess in the fifth and allowed an inherited runner to score on a wild pitch. He added a scoreless sixth but loaded the bases with one out in the seventh and got pulled.

Frank Herrmann inherited the bases-loaded situation and promptly walked the first batter he faced, Jose Reyes, to force in a run. It was all downhill from there, as Asdrubal Cabrera took him deep to right for a grand slam.

Patrick Schuster gave up four runs in the eighth on a Jose Reyes double with the bases loaded and a two-run single by Eric Campbell.

Luis Garcia allowed two runners to score in the eighth on a Michael Conforto double, one of which was assigned to Schuster.

At the plate
Cesar Hernandez’s 29-game streak of reaching base safely came to an end.

Freddy Galvis was the only Phillies player to advance past second base, singling in the first and then advancing on a wild pitch and steal of third. He was stranded by Howard’s grandout.

In the field
Hernandez and Freddy Galvis turned a 4-6-3 double play in the second inning in a runners-on-the-corners, no out situation.

Health check
Tyler Goeddel did not play as he recuperates from his concussion. Relievers Luis Garcia and Severino Gonzalez were unavailable last night due to ankle issues. Garcia pitched the end of the eighth in mop-up duty.

Up next
The Phillies will have a day off before they start their final homestand of the season against the Braves on Tuesday. Jerad Eickhoff (11-14, 3.75 ERA) will start for the Phillies. He has a 1.75 ERA against Atlanta in four starts against them this season.

The Braves’ scheduled starter has yet to be determined and their game against the Marlins scheduled for Sunday was cancelled once news emerged of Fernandez’s death.

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Alec Asher's two-seamer shines in another effective outing

Alec Asher's two-seamer shines in another effective outing

NEW YORK — Alec Asher’s two-seamer was nearly perfect against the Mets on Saturday night — even if the pitching line was attached to his name was decidedly less so.

The rookie exited after five innings with four unearned runs attached to his name — two Phillies’ throwing errors on playable ground balls will do that — but lowered his ERA to 1.66 in a 10-8 victory that was far, far closer than it needed to be.

Lost in the shuffle of the Phillies bullpen’s attempt at self-immolation was just how effective Asher’s newly-developed two-seam fastball was in the early innings against the Mets’ full lineup. The relatively slow pitch — it was sitting around 90 MPH Saturday — generated six popouts during his perfect first trip through the batting order.

“Being able to throw a pitch that’s not straight works wonders,” Asher said. “Last year, I didn’t really have success throwing the four-seam, so just adding that little bit of movement misses barrels, [generates] mishits and gave me a lot of ground balls and weak contact, which is all I can ask for.”

Opponents are batting just .182 off Asher’s two-seamer in his four starts this year, according to data from Fangraphs.com, a complete 180 from his disastrous September call-up in 2015.

In his first major league starts, Asher struggled to establish a mound presence with a four-seamer that nearly touched 95 mph. Opponents batted .250 and got seven extra-base hits off the four seamer as Asher finished 2015 with an ugly 9.31 ERA.

The Phillies challenged Asher to generative more movement on the pitch and he returned in Spring Training with an entirely new repertoire.

So far, the effort has paid off.

“It’s outstanding. It’s been a real good pitch for him and his changeup,” manager Pete Mackanin said of Asher’s two-seamer. “He didn’t have either pitch last year, and for him to come up with it over the course of the winter and throw those pitches so effectively is huge.”

Asher relied on the changeup to escape the fifth inning — the only high-stress situation he faced all evening.

With four runs already in, a fifth runner poised on third base and a Citi Field crowd beside itself in hopes of a miracle comeback, Asher got pinch-hitter James Loney to top a low changeup out of the zone down the first base line that Tommy Joseph stopped with a dive.

“[I wanted] just to slow the game down and take it pitch by pitch,” Asher said.

Even if Saturday wound up being perhaps a bit more frantic than he would have liked to be, Asher has developed a formula for future success as he prepares for his final start of the season next Friday — also against the Mets — and 2017.

“Just establishing the fastball, commanding both sides of the plate and changing speeds,” he said.

His two-run single in the first inning on Saturday night — his first two career RBIs and, ultimately, the winning margin — was a bonus.

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