Dallas Green did it his way -- driving the Phillies mad, but to the top

Dallas Green did it his way -- driving the Phillies mad, but to the top

Whenever I think of Dallas Green, I think of that night. It was Oct. 21, 1980, the night the Phillies won their first World Series. Green was the manager, the old-school baseball lifer who dragged the Phillies through that summer like a father tugging a whining toddler to the dentist's office. He called them out and cussed them out and challenged them to be the best team in baseball.

On this South Philadelphia night, they finally were. They beat the Kansas City Royals, 4-1, to close out the series, four games to two.

Green was standing in his Veterans Stadium office, his head tilted to one side, his eyes closed, the phone pressed against his ear. He had one hand on the World Series trophy, the other on a freshly opened bottle of Great Western champagne. Flashbulbs were popping all around him. His wife Sylvia and their four children were wiping away tears. Suddenly, the manager's weary eyes snapped to attention.

"Thank you, Mr. President," Green said hearing the voice of Jimmy Carter calling from the White House. "Yes, we're all thrilled. The City of Philadelphia has waited a long time for this moment and we're all enjoying it. There were a lot of people who said we couldn't do it but I think we proved ourselves in this series. We played our hearts out to win this thing."

Green's conversation with the President lasted just a few minutes then he excused himself to rejoin the celebration in the clubhouse. He hugged general manager Paul Owens then went from locker to locker embracing each player, even the ones he feuded with during the season. The sweet taste of autumn champagne washed away the bruised feelings of summer.

"Along the way, I made a few guys unhappy," Green said. "I probably made a few guys miserable. But it was all for a reason."

He nodded toward the celebration.

"This is the reason," he said.

Green drove the Phillies that season, lashing them with his bullwhip tongue, benching veterans for rookies down the stretch, ignoring the grumbling and dirty looks. When Green said, "We're going to do this thing my way," he meant it. Many of the players who were used to the gentle hand of the previous manager Danny Ozark resented Green and made no attempt to hide it. In September they still were sniping at each other. Then, somehow, it all came together.

It was as if the team -- which had fallen short in other years and underachieved in the postseason -- won it all that year just so it could have the satisfaction of throwing that World Series confetti in its manager's face. If that's what it took -- and believe me, that was part of it -- it was fine with Green.

"I'm proud of all these guys, every one of them," Green said that night. "I'm including guys like Larry Bowa and Garry Maddox, guys I had my differences with during the season. When we needed them down the stretch, they busted their butts for this team. I told them in spring training we had the talent to go all the way. I said, 'Hey, we've got the personnel to win this thing but we're gonna do it my way.' There were some doubters in the group, there were those who resisted, but look where we are now."

To get some idea of what that season was like, picture this scene: It is Sunday, Aug. 11, a sweltering hot day in Pittsburgh. The Phillies have just lost the first game of a doubleheader, 7-1, to the Pirates. Green orders the clubhouse doors locked so the reporters are standing in the hallway. The manager launches into a profane rant that is so loud we can hear every word.

"You guys have got to stop being so (expletive) cool," Green bellowed. "Get that through your (expletive) heads. Get the (expletive) off your asses. You're a good (expletive) baseball team but you're not now and you can't look in the (expletive) mirror and tell me that you are. You tell me you can do it but you (expletive) give up.

"If you don't want to (expletive) play, come in my office and (expletive) tell me because I don't want to (expletive) play you."

When the clubhouse door opened, the reporters tiptoed in expecting to find the walls scorched and furniture broken. Instead, Green was sitting behind his desk, his jaw clenched but his voice calm.

"I'm not gonna let these guys quit on themselves," he said. "If I have to yell at them to get them going, I'll yell good and loud. I may not be doing this (leading the club) the right way but I'm doing it the only way I know how."

The Phillies went on to Chicago where they won two of three from the Cubs, then to New York where they swept the Mets. The Phils rolled to the Eastern Division title then defeated Houston in a dramatic National League Championship Series and put away the Royals to claim their first world championship. The players had Big D's voice ringing in their ears every step of the way.

The night they won it, the night they finally reached the top of the mountain, Dallas Green enjoyed it more than anyone else. He grew up in Delaware, he was like family to the Carpenters who owned the team. He was a pitcher on the Phillies team that folded down the stretch in 1964. He carried those scars into a career in the front office and finally the dugout. Then came 1980 and the wild ride to the top.

"I know the players are happy and I'm happy as hell for them," Green said leaning against the clubhouse wall. "But they can't appreciate this the way I can. I've been a Phillie forever. I made a stop at every level in the organization: player, coach, manager, farm director. I have a feel for what this (win) means for all the people behind the scenes like the secretaries and the front office staff. I know how they feel right now.

"What do I feel? I feel drained. I feel as if I've given everything I've got to give. But, goddam, it feels good to be on top."

Today's Lineup: Howie Kendrick misses 4th straight, Ty Kelly starts at second base

Today's Lineup: Howie Kendrick misses 4th straight, Ty Kelly starts at second base

After being demolished, 9-2, Saturday, Ty Kelly gets a rare start for the Phillies in Game 3 of four vs. the Diamondbacks (4:10/CSN).

Howie Kendrick will miss his fourth straight game while dealing with hamstring tightness. 

"We're just being cautious," manager Pete Mackanin said after Saturday’s loss.

Kelly will start at second base in his place. Andres Blanco had started the previous three games in Kendrick’s absence, where he went 1 for 11.

Kelly has hit .229 on the season with as many hits (8) as strikeouts. Kelly will bat eighth for the Phillies.

Freddy Galvis remains in the two-hole after picking up two hits Saturday. That's his fourth-straight game with at least two hits. Galvis is now hitting .300 in the month of June.

Jeremy Hellickson takes the mound for the Phillies, looking to build off of his best start of the month in his last outing. For more on Hellickson facing his former team, check out today’s game notes (see game notes)

Here is the Phillies lineup:

1. Cameron Perkins, LF
2. Freddy Galvis, SS
3. Aaron Altherr, RF
4. Tommy Joseph, 1B
5. Maikel Franco, 3B
6. Odubel Herrera, CF
7. Andrew Knapp, C
8. Ty Kelly, 2B
9. Jeremy Hellickson, P

Here is the D-backs lineup:

1. Gregor Blanco, LF
2. Nick Ahmed, SS
3. Paul Goldschmidt, 1B
4. Chris Owings, RF
5. Daniel Descalso, 3B
6. Brandon Drury, 2B
7. Reymond Fuentes, CF
8. Jeff Mathis, C
9. Randall Delgado, P

Report: Maikel Franco 'more than available' in trade talks

Report: Maikel Franco 'more than available' in trade talks

With just over a month to go before the July 31 trade deadline and the Phillies well in the league's basement, Matt Klentak is reportedly looking to the future. 

The Phillies have made underachieving third baseman Maikel Franco "more than available" in trade talks, according to Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe.

In a make-or-break year for the 24-year-old, Franco has struggled mightily, slashing just .221/.280/.645 and has grounded into the most double plays in all of MLB. 

As CSNPhilly.com's Jim Salisbury wrote during spring training, if Franco doesn't show promise and improvement in 2017, the Phillies could target Manny Machado as their third baseman of the future in free agency this offseason.

As Salisbury has long said, the Phillies are unsure if Franco is a future building block and a trade is possible.

If the Phillies were to trade Franco before the deadline, they sure would be selling low on a player who has shown spurts of consistent power hitting.