David Montgomery on Dallas Green: 'There are few people more synonymous with the Phillies'

David Montgomery on Dallas Green: 'There are few people more synonymous with the Phillies'

CLEARWATER, Fla. -- David Montgomery had a few tears in his eyes as he spoke about Dallas Green on Wednesday.

Everyone did.

"There are very few people who were more synonymous with the Phillies than Dallas," said Montgomery, who joined the Phillies ticket office in 1971 and rose to become club president, part owner and now chairman.

"For me, growing up watching this guy pitch, and then the first time you meet him, I mean, what a presence. There's no other way to describe it. He filled the room with his presence.

"I can remember people coming back from spring training in '71, and I'm working in the ticket office, then all of a sudden you meet Dallas Green. You have to step back a little bit when you meet Dallas Green -- his size and his personality and his voice. What a thrill. And you know what? That never died."

Green, who managed the Phillies to their first World Series title in 1980, died Wednesday after a long battle with kidney disease. He was 82 (see story).

After his playing career ended, Green, an imposing man of 6-foot-5 with a square jaw, wide shoulders and booming voice, joined the Phillies player development staff and in the early 1970s helped groom one of the best collections of talent the organization has ever known. When that group of talent couldn't get over the hump and win a World Series, Green was asked by general manager Paul Owens to become manager late in the 1979 season. Owens thought that team had grown complacent and needed Green's tough, demanding in-your-face style.

"I was a contemporary of some of the players. I knew some of them," Montgomery said. "They asked, 'Why do we have this guy? We like Danny (Ozark).'

"But it turned out that Dallas was what some of them needed. We owe 1980 to that.

"I think Dallas enjoyed his size and his presence to back people away. But when you get to the core of the man, he was a lot more loveable."

Green left the Phillies in 1982. He ran the Chicago Cubs and later managed the Yankees and Mets before finding his way back to Philadelphia as a front-office man.

Forty-six of his 62 years in pro ball were spent with the Phillies.

"Thankfully he came back to us," Montgomery said. "We had the pleasure of being with him for the last 20 years."

Phillies rookies Mark Leiter Jr., Rhys Hoskins star in shutout

Phillies rookies Mark Leiter Jr., Rhys Hoskins star in shutout

BOX SCORE

There were two great storylines in the Phillies' 8-0 win over the Miami Marlins on Wednesday night (see Instant Replay).

One of them was Rhys Hoskins. The hard-hitting rookie drove in five runs with a three-run homer and a two-run double. The homer, 445 feet into the second deck in left, was his seventh, all in the last 10 games. This game is obsessed with power and if the 24-year-old from Sacramento keeps this up, this town will soon be obsessed with him.

But as compelling as Hoskins' performance was in this game, it might have ranked second best on the night, especially when you look at it this way: Hoskins has been a top Phillies prospects for a couple of years now. He hit 38 homers in Double A last year and 29 more in Triple A before coming up earlier this month. He averaged 99 RBIs over his first three full minor-league seasons. People were eagerly awaiting his arrival and his early results in the major leagues aren't a complete surprise.

That brings us to the other great storyline in Wednesday's win. The top storyline.

Mark Leiter Jr. does not have Hoskins' minor-league credentials. He never made one of those top-10 prospects lists or was considered for the Futures Game. Heck, he didn't even get an invite to big-league spring training camp this year. He was a 22nd-round draft pick out of that baseball powerhouse known as the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He was an underdog, just a kid looking for a chance, from the moment he signed.

But in addition to being an underdog, he's a grinder, a determined bulldog who exudes Jersey toughness, pitching savvy and a full menu of pitches that he knows how to execute.

"Every day you come in and try to prove yourself," Leiter said. "You've got to believe in yourself, and when you get opportunities you have to try to do your best."

Leiter was the story of Wednesday night's win because of what happened on Tuesday. The Phillies were swept by the Marlins in a doubleheader. Phillies pitching gave up 27 hits and 19 runs in the doubleheader and the bullpen had to pick up 7 2/3 innings in the nightcap.

So Leiter had to be really good against a lineup that featured three big bats in Giancarlo Stanton, Christian Yelich and Marcell Ozuna. And he had to stick around a while to help a beat-up bullpen.

He succeeded on all fronts, pitching seven innings of shutout ball and giving up just one hit.

"I don’t know who my favorite player is, either Leiter or Hoskins right now," a pleased manager Pete Mackanin said after the win. "I’m trying to make a decision on that. Right now they’re about tied.

"Mark saved the bullpen. It was a sorely needed outing."

Leiter's dad, Mark Sr., pitched for the Phillies in 1997 and 1998.

After Wednesday's game, the younger Leiter checked his phone.

"Great job," was the text message from his dad.

Leiter opened the game with five no-hit innings. He struck out five in the first two innings. He got big run support thanks to a five-run third inning when the Phils hit for the cycle and Hoskins clubbed a three-run homer after actually asking Mackanin if he should simply try to move the runners. Mackanin laughed and told Hoskins, "We're paying you to drive in runs." Hoskins obliged.

"Rhys is a great hitter having a great year," Leiter said. "It's fun to see him come up and having that success and contribute to us scoring a lot of runs."

Leiter watched from the dugout as the Marlins lit up Aaron Nola and Nick Pivetta on Tuesday. That did not create any anxiety in the 26-year-old right-hander. The guy doesn't get rattled.

"I just tried to command the strike zone and get ahead early," he said. "They have a great lineup over there. The key is getting ahead and keeping guys off balance as much as you can. It's the big leagues so you have to be good every time. Every lineup can hurt you. You have to execute.

"The most important thing was going deep into the game and giving the guys in the bullpen a blow. You can't go out there and chase strikeouts. You have to try to say within yourself and get outs."

Leiter retired Stanton — owner of a majors-best 46 homers — three times.

"He's locked in," Leiter said. "You know he's in the lineup. You have to try to make sure no one is on base when he comes up and then keep him off balance. He's having a special season, and as a fan of baseball it's fun to watch. I don't want to see me on too many of those highlights, but he's having a great year. He's got a chance at 60 or 61 homers. It hasn’t been done in a long time."

Leiter's role remains undefined. Basically, he is a swingman, someone who can pitch as a long reliever or make spot starts, like this one. Those guys are valuable to clubs.

Either way, Leiter has put himself on the map this season. Not bad for a guy who was so far off the radar that he didn't even get an invite to big-league camp in the spring.

"He's made a great impression," Mackanin said.

Best of MLB: Pirates spoil Rich Hill's no-hitter with walk-off HR in 10th inning

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Best of MLB: Pirates spoil Rich Hill's no-hitter with walk-off HR in 10th inning

PITTSBURGH -- Dodgers lefty Rich Hill lost his perfect game on an error in the ninth inning, then lost his no-hitter on a leadoff home run in the 10th by Josh Harrison that sent the Pittsburgh Pirates over Los Angeles 1-0 Wednesday night.

Hill became the first pitcher since Pedro Martinez in 1995 to take a no-hit try into extra innings.

The Pirates didn't have a runner until Jordy Mercer led off the ninth with a sharp grounder that third baseman Logan Forsythe misplayed for an error. Hill retired the next three batters.

Hill (9-5) came back out for the 10th and Harrison sent his 99th pitch of the night into the first row of seats in left field, just out of the reach of Los Angeles leftfielder Curtis Granderson. Hill struck out 10 without a walk.

Juan Nicasio (2-5) picked up the win after working the top of the 10th (see full recap).

Orioles regroup after Britton’s save streak ends at 60
BALTIMORE -- Zach Britton's AL-record run of converting 60 straight save attempts ended amid the evening shadows of Camden Yards, when the Orioles closer blew a two-run lead and failed to get out of the ninth inning in a game Baltimore ultimately won in the 12th, 8-7 over the Oakland Athletics on Wednesday.

Baltimore led 7-5 heading into the ninth when Britton entered to seal the victory, just as he had been doing successfully since the final days of the 2015 season. On this occasion, however, the left-hander gave up three straight hits before a sacrifice fly by Matt Joyce tied it.

Following a walk to Khris Davis, Britton was replaced by Miguel Castro (3-1), who quelled the uprising.

Manny Machado led off the 12th with a home run off Simon Castro (1-2) to end a game that lasted 4 hours, 20 minutes.

Britton's streak began on Oct. 1, 2015, extended through all of last season and went for 11 more saves this year. He had not blown a save since Sept. 20, 2015, at Tampa Bay.

Britton finished well short of Eric Gagne's major league mark of 84, set from 2002-04 (see full recap).

Schwarber, Cubs continue surge with win over Reds
CINCINNATI -- Kyle Schwarber hit a three-run homer in the ballpark near his home, Tommy La Stella added a two-run shot while subbing for Kris Bryant, and the Chicago Cubs kept their second-half surge going with a 9-3 victory over the Cincinnati Reds on Wednesday night.

The defending World Series champions have won eight of 10. They are 11 games over .500 for the first time this season and have their biggest lead in the NL Central, 3 1/2 games ahead of Milwaukee.

Left-hander Mike Montgomery (4-6) allowed four hits in six shutout innings, filling in for Jon Lester in the rotation. Joey Votto, Eugenio Suarez and Scott Schebler homered in the ninth for the Reds (see full recap).