Don't laugh: Stopper Kendrick leads Phillies past Marlins

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Don't laugh: Stopper Kendrick leads Phillies past Marlins

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Kyle Kendrick might be on the best roll of his major-league career, but he hasn’t lost his humility.

So when someone used the word “stopper” to describe him after he picked up his third win in six starts in a 7-2 victory over the Miami Marlins on Thursday night, Kendrick nearly laughed out loud (see Instant Replay).

It was almost as if he wanted to say: Those guys ahead of me in the rotation -- you know, Messrs. Hamels, Halladay and Lee -- they’re stoppers. I’m just little, ol’ sinkerballer Kyle Kendrick.

Well, look what little, ol’ sinkerballer Kyle Kendrick is doing these days. He’s 3-1 with a 2.43 ERA after a half-dozen starts. By comparison, Hamels is 1-3 with a 4.78 ERA, Halladay is 2-3 with a 6.75 ERA and Lee is 2-2 with a 3.46 ERA.

As a team, the Phillies are 4-2 in Kendrick’s starts. By comparison, they are 2-4 in Halladay’s starts, 2-4 in Lee’s starts and 1-5 in Hamels’ starts.

A month into the season, Kendrick has been this club’s best starter. And after his last two starts, well, maybe that stopper label isn’t something to snicker at. After all, Thursday night’s seven-inning, two-run performance came after the Phils were tuned-up in a pair of losses at Cleveland. Kendrick’s previous win, a shutout against the Mets in New York, came after the Phils had lost three straight to Pittsburgh.

“I don’t look at myself as a stopper,” Kendrick said. “I’m just trying to pitch a quality game and give us a chance to win.”

Kendrick’s performance Thursday night didn’t have the shine of his outing in New York, but it was impressive because he battled his way through early command problems and never lost his cool in pitching out of trouble several times. Several years ago, Kendrick might have tightened up in close situations and slowed the game down. By in this one, he kept his pace and rhythm. He got two big strikeouts in the third inning, one with two men on, the other with the bases loaded.

Kendrick spent the last few seasons as a swingman, filling rotation spots when needed then being shipped to the bullpen. He wanted the chance to start full-time and got it when Joe Blanton was traded last August. In his last 16 starts dating to mid-August, Kendrick is 10-4 with 2.43 ERA. After years of ups and downs, the 28-year-old right-hander is becoming a dependable major-league pitcher.

“I’ve always kind of expected this out of me,” Kendrick said. “I know it hasn’t been there in the past like I’ve wanted, the fans have wanted, my teammates, the coaches, the organization, but I expect this out of me. Hopefully, now I can be consistent like that and give us a chance to win the game. That’s the main thing as a starting pitcher. I’m feeling comfortable and confident I can do that every time out.”

That’s a pretty good quote. It shows great awareness on Kendrick’s part and also the maturity that is becoming evident in his pitching.

Erik Kratz has been behind the plate for Kendrick’s last three outings. Kendrick has allowed just four runs in 22 innings over the span. Clearly, the two are connecting.

“He has the ability to throw all his pitches for strikes,” Kratz said. “And he’s being aggressive with them. He’s not afraid of contact. Kyle has built on that second half he had last year. He’s very confident. It’s rewarding having a game plan and seeing him execute it.”

Kratz had an important contribution beyond his work behind the plate. The Phils were up, 2-1, in the fifth inning (on the strength of solo home runs by Domonic Brown and Ryan Howard) when Kratz worked an 11-pitch walk to open the bottom of the fifth. He moved up on a bunt by Kendrick, went to third on an error and scored on a sacrifice fly by Chase Utley. The two-runinning gave Kendrick some breathing room before the Phils pulled away at the end.

“It ended up being a good at-bat for the team,” Kratz said. “Then Kyle got the bunt down. That’s what we talk about every day, ‘Keep the line moving. Keep the momentum going.’”

The Phils are three games under .500 and struggling to put together consistency. It’s difficult to call that momentum. But as new rightfielder Delmon Young said after the game, “We’re struggling and we’re still only 4½ games back. No one has taken off yet. Last year, I was with (World Series team) Detroit and we were picked to win and we were under .500 for awhile before getting hot at the right time. This is a six-month season. You just need to stay within striking distance, be no more than five games out at the all-star break and you can make your move because you play the division teams so much in the second half.”

Phillies promote outfielder Andrew Pullin to Triple A after strong run with Reading

Phillies promote outfielder Andrew Pullin to Triple A after strong run with Reading

Cameron Perkins' call-up to the majors opened up an outfield spot at Triple A Lehigh Valley and Andrew Pullin was the beneficiary, earning a promotion Thursday.

Pullin's success at Double A Reading has been somewhat overshadowed by Scott Kingery's eye-popping first three months but Pullin has nearly kept pace with the second baseman all season. In 67 games with Reading, the 23-year-old Pullin hit .308/.368/.556 with 22 doubles, 14 home runs and 46 RBIs.

The left-handed hitting Pullin has been locked in for the better part of the last two years. He hit .322 with an .885 OPS last season, splitting time between Clearwater and Reading.

Pullin is not on the 40-man roster and in December was exposed in the Rule 5 draft. For whatever reason, he went unclaimed. It's difficult to imagine that happening again this winter if he's not protected on the 40.

As for Kingery, expect his promotion to come soon. Phillies general manager Matt Klentak said last week that the next challenge for Kingery is looming. Don't be surprised if that promotion from Double A to Triple A occurs Monday when the IronPigs return to Lehigh Valley. With Reading home this weekend, it would be just a short trip for Kingery.

Today's lineup: Odubel Herrera batting 3rd as Aaron Altherr gets day off

Today's lineup: Odubel Herrera batting 3rd as Aaron Altherr gets day off

Odubel Herrera made a costly mistake in the Phillies' 10th-inning, 7-6 loss to the Cardinals Wednesday night.

With the game tied in the bottom of ninth, Herrera ran through a stop sign from third base coach Juan Samuel and was subsequently thrown out at home by a mile, thus putting an end to the inning. When the Phils came out onto the field for the top of the 10th inning, Herrera was taken out of the game via a double-switch. 

Herrera won't have to wait long to have a chance to redeem himself as he was moved from sixth to third in the Phils' lineup Thursday, with the team looking to avoid having a series swept from them for a second consecutive time. Aaron Altherr, who had been mostly manning the No. 3 spot in the order, was given the day off. Howie Kendrick, who paces the Phillies with a .350 batting average, was also left out of the lineup in favor of Andrés Blanco.

Cameron Perkins, who made his first major league start in the leadoff spot last night, will bat first again after collecting a pair of hits.

Carlos Martinez will take the mound for the Cardinals looking to deliver the Phillies their 14th loss in the last 15 games. Martinez (6-5, 2.86 ERA) tossed a complete-game shutout against the Phils on June 10, surrendering just four hits while striking out 11 in a 7-0 St. Louis win.

Opposite Martinez will be Aaron Nola (3-5, 4.76 ERA), who tossed five innings of three-run ball in his only start against the Cardinals this season on June 10. Nola has been tagged with a loss in five of his last six outings. 

Here is today's full lineup:

1. Cameron Perkins, RF
2. Freddy Galvis, SS
3. Odubel Herrera, CF
4. Maikel Franco, 3B
5. Daniel Nava, LF
6. Tommy Joseph, 1B
7. Andrés Blanco, 2B
8. Cameron Rupp, C
9. Aaron Nola, P