Galvis flashes versatility in Phillies' victory

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Galvis flashes versatility in Phillies' victory

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Interim manager Ryne Sandberg has made it clear that he intends on giving the Phillies’ up-and-comers a chance to show what they can do.

Lately, Sandberg has been rewarded for his faith in the kids.

In the 4-2 victory over the San Diego Padres on Wednesday night, it was Freddy Galvis’ turn to deliver for Sandberg and the Phillies as they won their fourth game out of the last five (see Instant Replay).

Galvis went 3 for 3 with a solo homer, a double and he scored a pair of runs. Playing second base in order to give Chase Utley the night off against left-handed pitcher Eric Stults, Galvis also added a pair of RBIs. One came on home run in the fifth to get the Phillies on the board and the other RBI came on a safety squeeze in the eighth to give an insurance run to starter Cliff Lee and closer Jonathan Papelbon.

That’s versatility. Actually, the approach at the plate when Sandberg put on the squeeze play required much more focus than the swing Galvis put on his homer.

“Yeah, I think it’s a little tough sometimes,” Galvis said. “You try to think too much when you have something like that. You try to put the ball in play. I got a good pitch right in the middle and thank God it worked out.”

Though the numbers don’t pop off the stat page, Galvis has worked out in a lot of different ways for the Phillies this season. Signed and developed as a shortstop out of Venezuela, Galvis has played second and third base and left field for the Phillies. And after playing 580 of his 586 minor-league games as a shortstop, Galvis was the 2012 Opening Day second baseman with just 16 of his 112 big-league games at his natural position.

Perhaps if Galvis is going to make it in the big leagues, it’s going to be as a do-it-all utility type of player. It helps that Galvis is a switch-hitter at the plate, too.

“That’s his game -- situational guy,” Sandberg said. “He handles the bat. Good hit-and-run guy. A safety squeeze right there. He battled the pitcher good on outside soft stuff. He’s a thinking guy at home plate. He’s thinking with the pitcher. He got an inside fastball and turned on that with the short stroke for the home run. Those are the type of things Freddy can do.”

Galvis’ homer tied the game at 1-1 in the fifth. He also led off the seventh with a double down the left-field line and came around to score the go-ahead run after the Phillies manufactured some offense.

With no outs and two on in the seventh, Sandberg kept Lee in to drop a sacrifice bunt in a situation that typically calls for a pinch hitter. But with the Phils’ lefty cruising with a four-hitter through seven innings with eight strikeouts and 89 pitches, Sandberg wanted to get at least one more inning from Lee.

The successful bunt made it look like a smart move.

“I was glad Ryno let me stay in there to do that,” said Lee, who improved to 13-6 after going eight innings for the fourth time in the last six starts. “That was big. A lot of times you get pinch-hit for right there. I was glad he had enough faith in me to get the bunt down and execute, then go back out there in the eighth to put a zero up. That was good. I enjoyed that.”

Lee’s bunt set the table for Cesar Hernandez to ward off a fourth straight strikeout and drive home the go-ahead run with a soft ground out. An inning later, after Carlos Ruiz led off the eighth with a single and Darin Ruf walked before a ground out put runners at the corners, Galvis dropped the safety squeeze for the important insurance run.

A homer from the right side of the plate and a squeeze bunt from the left -- yes, that’s versatility.

“He was an excellent bunter in both directions,” Sandberg said. “He handled the bat from both sides. That's his game.”

The Phillies will try to take the series from the Padres on Thursday night when Roy Halladay (3-4, 7.19) pitches against right-hander Tyler Ross (3-7, 2.79).

Yankees 9, Phillies 4: Cameron Perkins comes out swinging

Yankees 9, Phillies 4: Cameron Perkins comes out swinging

TAMPA -- The Phillies’ bats were slow getting started in the Grapefruit League opener Friday afternoon. The Phils did not have a baserunner through the first six innings in a 9-4 loss to the New York Yankees at Steinbrenner Field.

“First game, I’m just happy we got at-bats because the pitching is always ahead of the hitting this early,” Phillies manager Pete Mackanin said afterward.

Outfielder Cameron Perkins had the Phillies’ first hit, a single up the middle in the seventh inning. He added a solo homer in the ninth inning.

Perkins, 26, was the Phillies’ sixth-round pick in the 2012 draft out of Purdue University. He graduated from Southport High School in Indianapolis, the same school that produced Phillies great and Hall of Famer Chuck Klein.

A right-hander hitter who eschews batting gloves, Perkins hit .292 with eight homers and 47 RBIs at Triple A Lehigh Valley last season. He is not on the 40-man roster but was invited to camp for a look-see. He is considered a longshot to win a spot on the Phillies’ bench, but will certainly improve his chances if he keeps swinging it like he did Friday.

“I don’t think about it,” Perkins said of his bid to make the club. “All I can do is what I did today -- get my opportunity and make the most of it.”

Brock Stassi, another candidate for a job on the Phillies’ bench, also homered.

On the pitching side
Right-hander Alec Asher, who projects to open in the Triple A rotation, started for the Phils. He pitched two innings, allowed a home run to Didi Gregorius and struck out two.

Asher made big strides with his sinker last season. He’s added a cutter now.

Right-hander Nick Pivetta debuted with two scoreless innings. He gave up a hit, walked one and struck out three. The Phillies acquired Pivetta from Washington from Jonathan Papelbon in July 2015. He projects to open in the Triple A rotation, but first will pitch for Team Canada in the WBC in March.

“It’s a lifelong dream for me, right up there with whenever it is that I get my first start with the Phillies,” Pivetta said.

The bullpen
Mackanin has said he’d like to have two left-handed relievers in his bullpen. The Phillies have just one -- Joely Rodriguez -- on their 40-man roster, although it’s possible that Adam Morgan could be shifted from starter to reliever later in camp.

The Phils have brought two veteran lefties -- Sean Burnett and Cesar Ramos -- into camp on minor-league deals to compete for a job. Burnett made his debut Friday and gave up a triple, a sacrifice fly and a home run in his inning of work.

Luis Garcia was tagged for four hits and three runs in his spring debut.

Up next
The Phillies host the Yankees in Clearwater on Saturday afternoon. Morgan will start for the Phils against right-hander Adam Warren.

Hits King Pete Rose on Phillies' Wall of Fame ballot

Hits King Pete Rose on Phillies' Wall of Fame ballot

CLEARWATER, Fla. -- The Phillies have released their Wall of Fame ballot for 2017 and Pete Rose is on it for the first time.

Baseball’s all-time hits king joins Steve Bedrosian, Larry Christensen, Jim Fregosi, Gene Garber, Placido Polanco, Ron Reed, Scott Rolen, Manny Trillo and Rick Wise on the ballot.

The Phillies had to receive permission from commissioner Rob Manfred to include Rose on the ballot. Rose was placed on baseball’s permanently ineligible list in 1989 after he admitted to wagering on baseball during his time as manager of the Cincinnati Reds. The ban precludes him from appearing on the ballot for the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York.

Rose is still on the ineligible list, but Manfred has shown some leniency in recent years and Rose has been able to participate in some ceremonies. He was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds' Hall of Fame last summer. 

Rose was one of the stars on the Reds’ Big Red Machine, a club that won back-to-back World Series in 1975 and 1976. He came to the Phillies as a free agent before the 1979 season. He spent five years with the Phils and his leadership was considered key in getting a talented team over the top on its way to winning the 1980 World Series. 

The Phillies’ Wall of Fame ceremony will take place Aug. 12 at Citizens Bank Park. 

Fans have a voice in the voting, which is has begun on the team’s website -- www.Phillies.com. Fans can select their top three choices and the five finalists will serve as the official ballot for a special Wall of Fame selection committee.