Instant Replay: Mets 4, Phillies 3

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Instant Replay: Mets 4, Phillies 3

BOX SCORE

Cole Hamels’ difficult season continued in a 4-3 loss to the New York Mets on Friday night.

Hamels suffered his 11th loss, the most in the majors. He is the first Phillies’ pitcher to lose 11 games before July since 1937 when both Wayne LeMaster and Claude Passeau did it.

The Phillies gave Hamels a 3-0 lead in the second inning, but he could not hold it. Three of the four runs he allowed came with two outs.

The Phillies are 2-14 in Hamels’ 16 starts. Last year, they were 21-10 in his starts.

The Phils have lost nine of their last 13 to fall to 35-39.

Starting pitching report
Hamels did not allow a hit or a run in the first three innings. He then gave up seven hits and four runs over the next three innings and left the game trailing, 4-3. Three of the four runs that Hamels allowed came with two outs.

Hamels is 2-11 with a 4.50 ERA.

Mets’ right-hander Jeremy Hefner entered the game with an ERA of 15.68 in four career games against the Phillies. He allowed 10 hits in six innings, but just three runs in getting the win. He is 2-6 on the season.

Hefner pitched out of trouble in the fifth, getting Delmon Young on a line out to third with one out and Carlos Ruiz on a hard liner to center with the bases loaded to end the inning.

Bullpen report
Justin De Fratus, Jake Diekman and Mike Stutes kept it close for the Phils.

Scott Rice, Carlos Torres and Bobby Parnell (12th save) closed it out for the Mets. The trio did not allow a hit.

At the plate
The Phils took a 3-0 lead in the second inning. The rally was highlighted by back-to-back doubles by Ryan Howard and Domonic Brown. Howard had two doubles in the game. Seven of the Phils’ 10 hits were singles.

The Phillies left 10 runners stranded on base in the loss.

Ben Revere had a bunt hit and an infield hit. He has hit in 11 straight games.

Eric Young Jr., recently designated for assignment by Colorado and picked up in a trade by the Mets, led off the fourth inning with a double and scored his team’s first run. Young tied the game at 3-3 an inning later when he laced a two-out, two-run single up the middle on a 2-2 fastball from Hamels. Juan Lagare put the Mets ahead with an RBI double in the sixth. The hit scored Lucas Duda, who had reached on a one-out walk.

Transaction
The Phillies activated Chase Utley from the disabled list and sent Michael Martinez to Triple A.

Up next
The two teams play again Saturday afternoon at 4:05. Jonathan Pettibone (3-3, 4.40) and Dillon Gee (5-7, 4.56) are the pitchers.

MLB Notes: Dodgers sign LHP Rich Hill to 3-year deal

MLB Notes: Dodgers sign LHP Rich Hill to 3-year deal

LOS ANGELES — The Dodgers have signed free-agent pitcher Rich Hill to a three-year contract after he went 3-2 with a 1.83 ERA in six starts with the team he joined at the trade deadline.

The 36-year-old left-hander was acquired in a five-player trade with Oakland on Aug. 1. Hill was 1-1 with a 3.46 ERA in three postseason starts for the NL West champion Dodgers, including tossing six scoreless innings to win Game 3 of the NL Championship Series against the Chicago Cubs.

Hill was 12-5 with a 2.12 ERA in 20 starts for the Dodgers and A's last season. His ERA was second-best in the majors behind Dodgers teammate Clayton Kershaw's 1.69.

Hill was limited at times by a finger blister and a groin injury.

He has a 38-28 career record with a 4.10 ERA in 221 games in 12 major league season with the Cubs, Orioles, Red Sox, Indians, Angels, Yankees, A's and Dodgers.

Japan: Otani could be headed to MLB
TOKYO — Japanese pitcher Shohei Otani says he could move to Major League Baseball after the 2017 season.

The 22-year-old righthander, who has also shown potential as a hitter, signed a $2.37 million contract for next season with the Nippon Ham Fighters on Monday.

Otani will not become eligible for free agency until after the 2021 season and will need the Fighters' approval to negotiate with a major league club through the posting system before that time.

Otani says "we discussed the possibility of me going. ... The club will respect my wishes whenever I decide I want to go."

Otani went 10-4 as a pitcher and batted .322 with a career-high 22 home runs this season for the Fighters.

Blue Jays: Pearce signs
TORONTO — The Toronto Blue Jays signed utility player Steve Pearce to a two-year, $12.5 million contract.

The Blue Jays announced the move Monday. It could spell the end of Edwin Encarnacion's tenure in Toronto as Pearce primarily plays first base and first baseman Kendrys Morales and Justin Smoak are also on the roster.

Pearce hit .288 with 13 home runs in 85 games for Tampa Bay and Baltimore last season. The right-handed hitter can also play second base and left and right field and hit .309 against left-handed pitchers.

Not signing fan favorite Encarnacion will not go over well in Toronto, which led the American League in attendance. Encarnacion hit 42 home runs and led the AL with 127 RBIs along with David Ortiz. The Blue Jays might also let free agent right fielder Jose Bautista sign elsewhere.

Toronto has avoided large long-term contracts since Mark Shapiro became president of the club following the 2015 season.

Pearce, 33, underwent surgery to repair flexor tendons in his right forearm in late September and was expected to be out four to six months.

5 Winter Meetings thoughts: Phillies/Tyson Ross; McCutchen; Benoit

5 Winter Meetings thoughts: Phillies/Tyson Ross; McCutchen; Benoit

Five thoughts on the early happenings at the Winter Meetings:

1. McCutchen rumors
The most mentioned player right now is Andrew McCutchen, who is likely to be traded by the Pirates. McCutchen is by far Pittsburgh's most popular player, the one credited with leading the Bucs out of their lengthy playoff slump. He's won an MVP and led the league in hits, on-base percentage and OPS at one point. 

I don't think McCutchen is finished as a star player. From 2012 to 2015, he hit .313/.404/.523 and averaged 65 extra-base hits (25 HR), 82 walks and 120 strikeouts. Last season, he hit .256/.336/.430 with 53 extra-base hits (24 HR), 69 walks and 143 strikeouts.

McCutchen's bat and legs looked a bit slower last season. His numbers with two strikes plummeted. But I still think he's going to hit around .290 with a .400-plus OBP in 2017. The guy's 30, not 36. 

The Nationals have been the team connected to McCutchen the most, but reports indicate they're unwilling to part with their top, top prospects. There's demand for McCutchen, but I still don't see the Pirates getting full value based on McCutchen's lackluster 2016 and the $28.75M owed to him the next two seasons.

2. Benoit a good idea for Phillies
The Phillies haven't officially signed Joaquin Benoit, but my early take on the move, if it happens, would be that such a deal is rarely a bad idea. Benoit will turn 40 in July, but he's maintained his effectiveness throughout his late-30s. Since 2010, a span of seven seasons, Benoit has a 2.40 ERA, 0.97 WHIP, 10.0 K/9, 2.8 BB/9 and a .189 opponents' batting average. Those are elite numbers. 

Benoit's fastball last season averaged 94.2 mph, a higher mark than he had seven seasons ago.

3. Tyson Ross a fit for Phils?
The most surprising non-tender last Friday was Padres right-handed starting pitcher Tyson Ross. The 29-year-old had a 3.03 ERA in 64 starts in 2014 and 2015 and was San Diego's opening day starter in 2016, but that was the only start he made. Ross hurt his right shoulder, had several setbacks and then underwent surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome in October. The recovery time is believed to be 4 to 6 months, putting him on pace to potentially be ready to pitch early next season.

A lot of teams will show interest in Ross, who was projected to make about $9.5 million in 2017, his final year before free agency. The Phillies should be one of the teams to examine Ross' health, and if they feel he has a real shot to return early next season, they should be aggressive to try to sign him. 

It's highly unlikely a pitcher with Ross' current bill of health will get a long-term contract. The Phillies, who have a ton of money to spend, could offer him a high one-year salary, allowing him a chance to make some money and reestablish his value. If he pitches well, they could try to keep him in the fold or trade him. 

Many teams will be connected to Ross because he's an intriguing name in a thin starting pitching market. But he makes as much sense for the Phillies as any other team — they have the payroll space, and they're at the juncture in their rebuild when it makes sense to take chances.

4. Closer market gone wild
The expected massive contracts for closers Aroldis Chapman and Kenley Jansen reflect the growing importance of star relievers. They also reflect the precedent set by the Phillies with Jonathan Papelbon's contract in 2012. Papelbon's $50 million deal was the most expensive ever for a closer at the time. These deals will exceed it by about $30 million, if not more. And they'll be logical contracts for the teams that sign them. The Marlins are thought to be aggressively pursuing one of them.

Mark Melancon reportedly agreed to a four-year, $62 million deal with the Giants, who badly needed a closer. Melancon's ERAs and saves totals have been comparable to Chapman's and Jansen's in recent years, but his stuff isn't. Melancon is much more reliant on command, and of the three closers I'd bet on his results declining first.

5. Typical Theo
The Cubs' addition of Jon Jay was such an under-the-radar, Theo Epstein move. I bet it pays off. Jay, a left-handed hitter who can play all three outfield positions, has been dogged by injuries the last two years but is still a heck of a hitter. He's hit .287 with a .352 OBP in 3,000 plate appearances, and is a player I always thought the Phillies should have pursued. 

Jay has underrated skills. He's not blazing fast and he doesn't have double-digit home run power, but if he's healthy he's going to hit .290 to .300 for your team with solid defense. He's like Martin Prado with better speed, defense and plate discipline. Wise way to protect against losing Dexter Fowler and do it in an inexpensive way.