Instant Replay: Mets 5, Phillies 0

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Instant Replay: Mets 5, Phillies 0

BOX SCORE

NEW YORK -- Mets’ starter Jonathon Niese wrecked the Phillies with his arm and his bat in a 5-0 victory on Tuesday night at Citi Field. Niese spun a three-hit shutout, allowing just one base runner to get to second base.

Meanwhile, the Phillies’ modest two-game winning streak came to an end with the defeat. At 60-72, the Phillies are tied for third place with the Mets in the NL East.

Starting pitching report
The regression of Kyle Kendrick continued on Tuesday night, no thanks to an error and bases on balls. Kendrick allowed five runs on five hits and four walks in six innings, though only one of those runs was earned and two of those walks were intentional.

Still, Kendrick has allowed four or more runs in eight of the last 11 starts and has a 6.10 ERA during that span in which the opposition is batting .344 off him.

Niese continued to school the Phillies on Tuesday night, picking up where he left off in his July 3 start at Citi Field. In that one, Niese held the Phillies to one run on three hits in eight innings in an 11-1 win.

In15 career starts against the Phillies, Niese is 6-6 with a 3.13 ERA.

Bullpen report
Zach Miner faced four hitters in a scoreless seventh before turning it over to Justin De Fratus for a 1-2-3 eighth.

At the plate
Michael Young was the big slugger for the Phillies, rapping out a pair of hits, including a double to lead off the eighth.

The Mets scored four runs in the sixth. All of the runs were unearned because of a throwing error by Kevin Frandsen when trying to get the lead runner on a grounder by Ike Davis. An intentional walk to Juan Lagares loaded the bases before Travis d’Arnaud drove in a run on a sacrifice fly.

With two outs, Kendrick intentionally walked the No. 8 hitter, Omar Quintanilla to bring up the pitcher Niese, who ripped the eighth pitch of his at-bat into the gap in left-center to clear the bases.

It was Niese’s first extra-base hit since 2011 and the three RBIs equaled his career-best for a season with four.

Big deal
Before the game the Mets announced that they had traded former Phillie Marlon Byrd along with catcher John Buck to the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Mets received 19-year-old second base prospect Dilson Herrera and a player to be named in the trade.

Both Buck and Byrd will be free agents at the end of the season.

Up next
The four-game series continues on Wednesday night when Cole Hamels (5-13, 3.62) takes on Daisuke Matsuzaka (0-1, 9.00). Hamels has faced the Mets three times this season, posting a 1-2 record with a 4.76 ERA. He last faced the Mets on July 20, going five innings and allowing four runs on seven hits in a 5-4 loss.

Matsuzaka will be making his second start of the season for the Mets and just his 20th in the big leagues since 2010. He has faced the Phillies twice, the last time on May 22, 2010 at Citizens Bank Park where Matsuzaka came four outs away from a no-hitter. Juan Castro’s single with two outs in the eighth inning was the Phils’ only hit that day.

Phillies set prospect-packed lineup for exhibition opener vs. U of Tampa

Phillies set prospect-packed lineup for exhibition opener vs. U of Tampa

The Phillies will have an exciting, young lineup Thursday in their annual exhibition opener against the University of Tampa.

1. Roman Quinn, CF (S)
2. J.P. Crawford, SS (L)
3. Dylan Cozens, RF (L)
4. Rhys Hoskins, 1B
5. Nick Williams, LF (L)
6. Jorge Alfaro, C
7. Scott Kingery, 2B
8. Hector Gomez, 3B
9. Andrew Pullin, DH (L)

RHP Mark Leiter

Gomez aside, it's a prospect-packed lineup that represents the best of the Phillies' farm system.

Several of these players — Crawford, Williams, Alfaro and Quinn — will likely taste the majors at some point this season. They're all in big-league camp for the second straight year. It's a first for Cozens, Hoskins and Kingery.

As CSN Phillies analyst Ricky Bottalico pointed out Tuesday on Phillies Focus (airing all week on CSN at 6 p.m.), it's, in a way, a lose-lose situation for Leiter. If he pitches well against Tampa, he did it vs. college kids. If he pitches poorly, then he was hit around by college kids. Not the easiest assignment.

The Phillies play Tampa at 1:05 p.m. Thursday.

On Friday, the Phillies travel to Tampa for the Grapefruit League opener against the Yankees (1:05 p.m.). Here is the posted lineup for that game:

1. Cesar Hernandez, 2B
2. Roman Quinn, CF
3. Daniel Nava, DH
4. Tommy Joseph, 1B
5. Chris Coghlan, RF
6. Tyler Goeddel, LF
7. Andrew Knapp, C
8. J.P. Crawford, SS
9. Hector Gomez, 3B

RHP Alec Asher

The Phillies' first televised spring training game on CSN is Saturday at 1:05 p.m., also against the Yankees.

Drew Anderson has emerged as one of the Phillies' top pitching prospects

Drew Anderson has emerged as one of the Phillies' top pitching prospects

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Drew Anderson remembers his telephone ringing in November. He remembers hearing Phillies director of player development Joe Jordan congratulate him and tell him that he'd been placed on the team's 40-man roster.

Anderson was elated.

"It was awesome," the right-handed pitcher said the other day.

So awesome that Anderson celebrated in an unusual way.

"I busted out 50 pushups," he said. "I had so much adrenaline."

The internal discussions that teams have when considering which players to protect on the 40-man roster and which ones to risk losing in the Rule 5 draft are often long and detailed and decisions are not always reached easily.

But in Anderson's case ...

"It was not a long conversation," Jordan said. "The feeling was, 'Put him on the roster. Don't lose him. Let's talk about the next guy.'"

"Across the board," minor-league pitching coordinator Rafael Chaves said. "And that's not common for a kid that pitched in A-ball."

Anderson, who turns 23 on March 22, will get his first taste of Double A ball in April.

Clearly, the Phillies are high on him.

But how high?

"We've got scouts who will tell you that he might be our best pitching prospect," Jordan said.

Given some of the power arms that the Phils have collected in the low minors, that's quite a statement.

If it seems as if Anderson has flown below the radar since being drafted by the Phillies in 2012 it's because, well, he's done just that.

For a while.

He received little interest from four-year colleges coming out of Galena High School in Reno, Nevada, and was headed to Mesa Community College in Arizona before the Phillies selected him in the 21st round that year.

"My name never really got out there," he said. "Really only the Phillies looked at me. (Area scout) Joey Davis saw me and he said he liked that I had a fluid arm and he liked the way the ball jumped out of my hand. He saw me as a sleeper pick. I just wanted to play ball so I said, 'Yeah, I'll give it a shot.'"

Jordan recalled seeing Anderson pitch at Single A Lakewood early in the 2014 season. Anderson had added strength to his 6-foot-3 frame and his fastball velocity had jumped from 90-92 mph to 93-95 mph.

"It was just a matter of physical maturity, his body getting stronger, and we were really excited," Jordan said.

Anderson did not make it through that season, however. He came down with an elbow injury and the following spring became a statistic — a pitcher who needed Tommy John surgery.

Anderson missed the 2015 season. He came back in May of last year and made 15 starts between Lakewood and Clearwater. At Clearwater, the Phillies' advanced Single A stop, Anderson posted a 1.93 ERA in 32 2/3 innings. He struck out 37 and walked 10.

The rehabilitation process after Tommy John surgery focuses on more than just the elbow. Special attention is paid to the shoulder and the legs. Working under Joe Rauch, the Phillies' minor-league rehab specialist, Anderson gained much strength in those areas and it showed in his fastball velocity last summer.

He got it up to 97 mph.

He also has a good breaking ball and an improving changeup to go with a classic pitcher's body. He has long arms and weighs 205 pounds.

"We just felt some team out there would have taken him even if they had to stash him in the bullpen," said Jordan, expounding on the Phils' decision to add Anderson to the 40-man roster in November. "He's too big an asset."

Anderson is excited about making the jump to Reading this season. He's never pitched more than 76 innings as a pro and now that he's healthy needs to start racking up mound time and experience.

Anderson mentioned how hard he worked this offseason to get ready for his first trip to big-league camp and what lies beyond when he heads to Double A.

The hard work started with those 50 pushups that he busted out upon learning that he'd been placed on the 40-man roster.

"After hearing that, it was time to kick it in gear," he said. "I was like, 'Let's do this.'

"I've had some ups and downs, but I feel like I'm on track now."