Instant Replay: Padres 8, Phillies 2

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Instant Replay: Padres 8, Phillies 2

BOX SCORE

The Phillies’ three-game winning streak came to an end in a lopsided 8-2 loss to the San Diego Padres on Tuesday night.

Hard-throwing right-hander Andrew Cashner pitched 7 2/3 dominant innings for the win.

The Phillies had just two hits entering the eighth inning. They had five in the final two innings and were out-hit, 13-7, for the night.

San Diego has won four in a row.

Starting pitching report
Tyler Cloyd pitched four-plus innings -- he did not get an out in the fifth -- and allowed nine hits and seven runs. Cloyd is 2-4.

Cashner had five 1-2-3 innings. He allowed four hits and a walk while striking out seven. Cashner is 9-8.

Bullpen report
Hard-throwing right-hander Ethan Martin, moved to the bullpen after struggling as a starter, saw his first work as a reliever. He needed just 10 pitches -- all strikes -- to get through a perfect sixth inning.

Dale Thayer and Brad Brach had trouble closing the door on the Phillies. Luke Gregerson got the final three outs.

At the plate
Cody Asche provided the Phillies’ first run run with a solo homer in the fifth. It came on a 2-2 changeup.

Chase Utley had a double in the fourth. Kevin Frandsen doubled in the ninth.

Jedd Gyorko and Chase Headley both had three hits for San Diego. Headley, Ronny Cedeno and Rene Rivera all drove in two runs.

Lineup stuff
Catcher Cameron Rupp made his first big-league start. He beat out a slow roller in the eighth for his first big-league hit. Rupp stumbled to the ground as he reached first base and received a nice ovation from the crowd.

The paid attendance was 29,242.

Health check
Roy Halladay hasn’t been feeling well, so he will move back a day and pitch Thursday night. Domonic Brown, recovering from a sore right Achilles tendon, is ramping up his rehab (see story).

Up next
Lefties Cliff Lee (12-6, 3.01) and Eric Stults (8-13, 4.07) are the pitchers in Wednesday night’s game.

Phillies will take a peek at Tim Tebow, mostly out of curiosity

Phillies will take a peek at Tim Tebow, mostly out of curiosity

CHICAGO — The Phillies will send a scout to watch Tim Tebow’s baseball showcase next Tuesday in Los Angeles.

Now, before you start clearing a space in your closet for a red-pinstriped Tebow jersey — you know, right next to the midnight green Tebow jersey — keep this in mind: the Phillies, and every other team that stops by Tebow’s workout, are merely practicing due diligence by taking a look at an accomplished athlete who long ago showed some baseball aptitude. Tebow’s chances of ever playing in a major-league game are extremely thin.

The former Heisman Trophy winner and two-time national championship quarterback from the University of Florida has not played baseball since 2005, his junior year in high school. He has been training as a baseball player for several months in Arizona. Next week’s showcase was arranged by Tebow’s representatives. Southern California is loaded with amateur baseball talent so many scouts live there. It makes sense that most teams would have a set of eyes on hand for curiosity if nothing else.

Tebow, who turned 29 earlier this month, was a left-handed hitting outfielder/pitcher in high school. He hit .494 with four homers and 30 RBIs as a junior at Nease High School in Ponte Vedra, Florida, before giving up baseball to focus on football. That was a good move as he enjoyed a storied run at Florida. But Tebow has not been able to stick in the NFL.

Tebow played for the Denver Broncos in 2010 and 2011 and the New York Jets in 2012. He attended training camp with the Eagles in 2015, but failed to make the team. He spent last year working as a broadcaster for ESPN.

Obviously, Tebow’s competitive juices still run hot. His athletic résumé alone will attract scouts to his baseball showcase, which, by the way, will be closed to the public.

Tonight's lineup: Phillies load up with righties vs. White Sox lefty Carlos Rodon

Tonight's lineup: Phillies load up with righties vs. White Sox lefty Carlos Rodon

The Phillies are loading up with right-handed hitters for Tuesday's series opener at U.S. Cellular Field against White Sox lefty Carlos Rodon.

Odubel Herrera is out of the lineup and Aaron Altherr takes his place in center field. Peter Bourjos and Tyler Goeddel are in the outfield corners. 

Carlos Ruiz serves as the designated hitter against Rodon, who has huge platoon splits. Righties have hit .305/.365/.484 against Rodon; lefties have hit .220/.268/.286.

Rodon has a changeup to stave off right-handed hitters, but he's used it only eight percent of the time this season. He's thrown his 94 mph fastball, sinker or slider with 92 percent frequency (see game notes).

Emmanuel Burriss gets a start at second base.

Ryan Howard is out of the lineup. U.S. Cellular Field is the only active stadium in which he's never played. The Phillies haven't been there since 2004.

1. Peter Bourjos, RF
2. Aaron Altherr, CF
3. Maikel Franco, 3B
4. Tommy Joseph, 1B
5. Cameron Rupp, C
6. Carlos Ruiz, DH
7. Freddy Galvis, SS
8. Tyler Goeddel, LF
9. Emmanuel Burriss, 2B

Suspended Phillies pitcher Alec Asher to begin rehab assignment

Suspended Phillies pitcher Alec Asher to begin rehab assignment

Phillies right-handed starting pitcher Alec Asher, who was suspended 80 games in late May for PEDs, will begin a rehab assignment Tuesday in the Gulf Coast League.

Asher, 24, was 3-0 with a 1.53 ERA in four starts with Triple A Lehigh Valley before the ban was handed down.

The Phillies will likely stretch him back out and get a look at him again in September. They've dealt with various injuries to starting pitchers, including Aaron Nola (elbow) and Zach Eflin (knees, foot). Plus, there's the possibility Vince Velasquez is shut down at some point in September. He is five innings shy of matching his career high. That could open up a spot in the rotation for Asher.

Asher debuted with the Phils last Aug. 30 after being acquired from the Rangers in the Cole Hamels trade. He went 0-6 with a 9.31 ERA in seven starts last season but pitched well in the minors early this year thanks to the addition of a two-seam fastball.