Instant Replay: Phillies 1, Braves 0

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Instant Replay: Phillies 1, Braves 0

BOX SCORE

One day after losing 1-0, the Phillies ended their nine-game homestand on a high note, avoided their third sweep in their last four home series, and exacted revenge on the Braves Thursday afternoon with a 1-0 win of their own.

Ben Revere's RBI single with two outs in the eighth inning provided the game's lone run. It came two pitches after Ryan Howard worked a full-count, pinch-hit walk against a left-handed pitcher.

By salvaging the final game of the Braves series, the Phillies improve to 7-8 ahead of an impending 10-game West Coast road trip. The Braves are 10-5.

Starting pitching report
A.J. Burnett, in his first outing since being diagnosed with an inguinal hernia, made his best start as a Phillie.

Burnett allowed just five baserunners over seven shutout innings and induced a season-high 13 groundouts, giving the Phillies a glimpse of what they paid $16 million for.

Even after a pair of shaky, six-walk outings, Burnett's ERA is down to 2.74. He didn't factor into the decision, however, and is still chasing his first victory as a Phillie.

Burnett worked around early control issues -- he walked the pitcher in the third inning and ran eight three-ball counts -- to throw 101 pitches.

Braves left-hander Alex Wood was also sharp through seven innings, but surrendered the game-winning run in the eighth.

The lefty Wood (2-2, 1.67) allowed eight hits and a run over eight innings, with one walk and seven strikeouts.

Bullpen report
Antonio Bastardo allowed a leadoff double to Braves backup catcher Gerald Laird to start the eighth, but struck out Wood, got Jason Heyward to line out, and popped up B.J. Upton on a 3-2 pitch that Upton narrowly mistimed to end the inning.

Jonathan Papelbon came on for a 1-2-3 save, his fourth of the season. Since allowing three runs in Texas to blow his first save opportunity of the year, Papelbon has pitched five scoreless innings and allowed just one hit.

The win went to Bastardo.

At the plate
Revere went 3 for 4 with the game-winning hit and a bunt single. He was also caught stealing for the first time this season on a pickoff.

Chase Utley, who had his 11-game hitting streak snapped Wednesday night, rebounded to go 2 for 3. Utley, who hit .219 against lefties from 2011-13, is 10 for 20 this season against left-handed pitchers. Those 10 hits vs. left-handed pitchers lead the majors. Mike Trout has nine.

Jayson Nix, starting at third base in place of Cody Asche, went 0 for 3 with three strikeouts. Nix is hitting .150 this season with no walks, no extra-base hits, and 10 strikeouts in 20 at-bats.

Successful challenge
With two outs in the fifth inning, Braves shortstop Andrelton Simmons appeared to have second base stolen, but he overslid the bag. Second base umpire Bill Welke initially called Simmons safe as he raced to stretch his hand back to the base.

Bench coach Larry Bowa made a "Who knows?" gesture to Ryne Sandberg from the dugout, but Sandberg challenged anyway and was rewarded, as further replays showed Simmons' fingertips were just off the bag as Jimmy Rollins applied the tag.

Boo birds
Burnett grounded out in the sixth inning on a ball Dan Uggla bobbled twice. Loud boos came down on Citizens Bank Park toward Burnett after the play, presumably based on a perceived lack of hustle.

This after Burnett had already shut the Braves out for six innings ... with a hernia.

Attendance
A nice, round number -- 25,750 paying customers at Citizens Bank Park on a chilly Thursday afternoon.

Next up
The Phillies will fly to Denver tonight and begin a three-game series at Coors Field against the Colorado Rockies at 8:40 p.m. Friday.

Here are the pitching matchups ...

Friday: Jonathan Pettibone (0-0, 1.80) vs. Tyler Chatwood (0-0, 6.00)
Saturday: Kyle Kendrick (0-1, 3.50) vs. Jordan Lyles (2-0, 4.32)
Sunday: Roberto Hernandez (1-0, 3.86) vs. Juan Nicasio (2-0, 3.50)

Chatwood, Lyles and Nicasio are all right-handed pitchers.

Drew Anderson has emerged as one of the Phillies' top pitching prospects

Drew Anderson has emerged as one of the Phillies' top pitching prospects

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Drew Anderson remembers his telephone ringing in November. He remembers hearing Phillies director of player development Joe Jordan congratulate him and tell him that he'd been placed on the team's 40-man roster.

Anderson was elated.

"It was awesome," the right-handed pitcher said the other day.

So awesome that Anderson celebrated in an unusual way.

"I busted out 50 pushups," he said. "I had so much adrenaline."

The internal discussions that teams have when considering which players to protect on the 40-man roster and which ones to risk losing in the Rule 5 draft are often long and detailed and decisions are not always reached easily.

But in Anderson's case ...

"It was not a long conversation," Jordan said. "The feeling was, 'Put him on the roster. Don't lose him. Let's talk about the next guy.'"

"Across the board," minor-league pitching coordinator Rafael Chaves said. "And that's not common for a kid that pitched in A-ball."

Anderson, who turns 23 on March 22, will get his first taste of Double A ball in April.

Clearly, the Phillies are high on him.

But how high?

"We've got scouts who will tell you that he might be our best pitching prospect," Jordan said.

Given some of the power arms that the Phils have collected in the low minors, that's quite a statement.

If it seems as if Anderson has flown below the radar since being drafted by the Phillies in 2012 it's because, well, he's done just that.

For a while.

He received little interest from four-year colleges coming out of Galena High School in Reno, Nevada, and was headed to Mesa Community College in Arizona before the Phillies selected him in the 21st round that year.

"My name never really got out there," he said. "Really only the Phillies looked at me. (Area scout) Joey Davis saw me and he said he liked that I had a fluid arm and he liked the way the ball jumped out of my hand. He saw me as a sleeper pick. I just wanted to play ball so I said, 'Yeah, I'll give it a shot.'"

Jordan recalled seeing Anderson pitch at Single A Lakewood early in the 2014 season. Anderson had added strength to his 6-foot-3 frame and his fastball velocity had jumped from 90-92 mph to 93-95 mph.

"It was just a matter of physical maturity, his body getting stronger, and we were really excited," Jordan said.

Anderson did not make it through that season, however. He came down with an elbow injury and the following spring became a statistic — a pitcher who needed Tommy John surgery.

Anderson missed the 2015 season. He came back in May of last year and made 15 starts between Lakewood and Clearwater. At Clearwater, the Phillies' advanced Single A stop, Anderson posted a 1.93 ERA in 32 2/3 innings. He struck out 37 and walked 10.

The rehabilitation process after Tommy John surgery focuses on more than just the elbow. Special attention is paid to the shoulder and the legs. Working under Joe Rauch, the Phillies' minor-league rehab specialist, Anderson gained much strength in those areas and it showed in his fastball velocity last summer.

He got it up to 97 mph.

He also has a good breaking ball and an improving changeup to go with a classic pitcher's body. He has long arms and weighs 205 pounds.

"We just felt some team out there would have taken him even if they had to stash him in the bullpen," said Jordan, expounding on the Phils' decision to add Anderson to the 40-man roster in November. "He's too big an asset."

Anderson is excited about making the jump to Reading this season. He's never pitched more than 76 innings as a pro and now that he's healthy needs to start racking up mound time and experience.

Anderson mentioned how hard he worked this offseason to get ready for his first trip to big-league camp and what lies beyond when he heads to Double A.

The hard work started with those 50 pushups that he busted out upon learning that he'd been placed on the 40-man roster.

"After hearing that, it was time to kick it in gear," he said. "I was like, 'Let's do this.'

"I've had some ups and downs, but I feel like I'm on track now."

Phillies Notes: Hector Neris looks to become three-pitch guy in 2017

Phillies Notes: Hector Neris looks to become three-pitch guy in 2017

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Hector Neris racked up 102 strikeouts, the second-most ever by a Phillies reliever, during his breakout 2016 season.

The right-hander did it basically with a two-pitch mix — a power fastball and a darting splitter that manager Pete Mackanin likes to call “an invisible pitch.”

After last season, Neris reflected on his success, which included a 2.58 ERA over 80⅓ innings, the third-most among NL relievers.

Neris determined that he would need to diversify his pitch repertoire if he’s going to continue to have success.

So during winter ball in his native Dominican Republic, he dusted off his seldom-used slider and threw it more. He’s polishing it up in this camp and plans to use it in the upcoming World Baseball Classic and during the regular season.

“I think it’s something that can make me better,” Neris said. “I’ve never had the confidence in it that I had in my other pitches, but I’m working hard on it. It will give me a third option for the hitter to think about.”

Neris threw a slider 2.9 percent of the time in 2016, according to MLB Statcast. He threw more than 49 percent splitters and 46 percent fastballs.

“In the big leagues you have to respect the hitter,” Neris said. “The hitters know me now and they know I throw fastballs and splitters. I need to have that third pitch for them to respect. When I throw it, I want them to say, ‘What is that?’”

Neris’ splitter darts down and in to a right-hander hitter. The slider will break the other way.

Neris has talked about different grips on the pitch with guest spring-training instructor Larry Andersen, who threw a million sliders in his career.

“He threw some nasty ones today,” Andersen said after Tuesday’s workout. “The pitch will help him.”

McLaren to WBC
Bullpen coach John McLaren will leave camp on Wednesday and travel to Japan as Team China assembles for the World Baseball Classic. McLaren will manage that club. He also skippered the club in 2013.

Asked if he spoke more than seven words of Chinese, McLaren quipped, “That would be pushing it. I’m still trying to conquer English.”

Team China will provide a translator for McLaren, though there is a universal element to baseball communication.

“This is my third time going to the WBC,” McLaren said. “I love it.”

Almost game time
The Phillies will play their annual exhibition game against the University of Tampa on Thursday. The Phils are expected to play many of the young players that will make up their Triple A Lehigh Valley roster. Right-hander Mark Leiter Jr., who pitched at Double A Reading last season, will come over from minor-league camp to make the start. Pitching coach Bob McClure said he expected to get several projected big-league relievers work in the game.

Alec Asher will start the Grapefruit League opener against the Yankees on Friday in Tampa and Adam Morgan will start Saturday’s games against the Yankees in Clearwater.