Instant Replay: Phillies 7, Marlins 3

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Instant Replay: Phillies 7, Marlins 3

BOX SCORE

MIAMI -- Tyler Cloyd re-joined the Phillies’ rotation Tuesday night and helped the club beat the Miami Marlins, 7-3.

The Phillies, who had scored just four runs in their previous three games, pushed four runs across the plate in the seventh inning to break open the game. Ryan Howard, back in the lineup after missing two games with a sore left knee, drove in two of those runs with a bases-loaded single on his way to a three-hit, three-RBI night.

The Phillies are two games under .500 for the eighth time since April 22. They have lost the next game each time. They will try to end the pattern and get to a game under .500 in the series finale Wednesday night.

Starting pitching report
Cloyd (1-0) made his second start in the spot vacated by injured Roy Halladay. The 26-year-old right-hander allowed eight hits and just two runs over seven innings. He walked two and struck out five.

Cloyd was 1-4 with a 6.57 ERA in seven starts at Triple A this season. He is 1-0 with a 2.70 ERA in two starts with the big club. In 13 1/3 innings with the Phils this season, he has allowed 10 hits, four runs and five walks while striking out nine.

The Phillies are 14-6 in games started by the so-called back end of the rotation -- Cloyd, Kyle Kendrick, Jonathan Pettibone and John Lannan. They are 8-18 in games started by the Big Three of Cole Hamels, Cliff Lee and Roy Halladay.

Relatively speaking, the Phillies had some success against the Marlins’ Jose Fernandez. The rookie right-hander did not allow a run over 13 innings of three-hit ball in his first two starts against the Phillies this season. In this one, the Phils had five hits and a run -- on Delmon Young’s solo homer -- against Fernandez in five innings. The Marlins have been careful with the 20-year-old pitcher’s workload. That’s why he left the game after five innings and 79 pitches.

Bullpen report
Antonio Bastardo pitched a 1-2-3 eighth. B.J. Rosenberg allowed a run in the ninth.

The Phils scored six runs against the Marlins’ bullpen. Duane Below took the loss.

At the plate
Young, who entered hitting .192 in his first 17 games with the club, belted a long, solo homer to left off Fernandez in the fourth inning. Domonic Brown drove in his 22nd and 23rd runs of the season with a tie-breaking groundout in the sixth and a double in the seventh. The Phils had five hits in the seventh inning. Three of them were infield hits before Howard’s two-run single to right.

The Phillies are 16-5 when they score at least four runs in a game. They are 6-19 when they score three or fewer runs.

In the field
John Mayberry Jr. made a nice diving catch on Juan Pierre's sinking liner to right to end the game.

Injury report
On the day Howard (sore left knee) returned to the lineup, Chase Utley was a late scratch with soreness in his right rib cage. Utley hurt himself during batting practice. He will be re-evaluated on Wednesday.

Up next
The Phillies will send Lee (4-2, 2.83) to the mound in Wednesday night’s series finale. He will face right-hander Kevin Slowey (1-4, 3.44).

The Phils are off Thursday before opening a series in Washington on Friday night.

Safe at home: MLB umpire John Tumpane rescues woman on bridge

Safe at home: MLB umpire John Tumpane rescues woman on bridge

PITTSBURGH -- John Tumpane can't explain why he approached the woman as she hopped over the railing of the Roberto Clemente Bridge on Wednesday afternoon.

The woman told Tumpane she just wanted to get a better view of the Allegheny River below. The look on her face and the tone of her voice suggested otherwise to Tumpane, a major league baseball umpire in town to work the series between the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Tampa Bay Rays.

So the 34-year-old Tumpane reached for the woman even as she urged him to let her go.

"It was just pure instinct," Tumpane said. "You hear kind of stories of this all the time, different scenarios, people aiding and situation where I was lucky enough to be there to help and try to think of everything I could do, hanging on to her. At times she wanted to go the other way. I was like, 'Not on my watch, please.' We were just hanging on."

And saving a life.

Tumpane secured one of her arms. A bystander walked up and grabbed the other while another -- Mike Weinman, an employee for the Rays -- clutched her legs and pinned them to the railing while Tumpane mouthed to someone in the crowd to call 911.

What followed were chaotic moments of panic, fear and ultimately, grace.

"I couldn't tell you how long we were waiting for everyone else to get in place," Tumpane said. "Obviously another power comes into be when you're hanging on and you know what the alternative is of you letting go and not having other people to help you."

Tumpane, Weinman and the third volunteer clung to the unidentified woman until emergency responders arrived. A police boat raced up the river to the iconic yellow bridge named for the Pirates Hall of Famer who died on Dec. 31, 1972, when a plane making humanitarian deliveries to earthquake victims in Nicaragua crashed. Now, 45 years later a crowd thrust together by fate brought a complete stranger back from the brink. Together.

"Once they were able to secure her, we were able to talk her back to help us out and we got her back on this side," Tumpane said. "After that I went up to her, she said, 'You'll just forget me after this,' and I said, 'No, I'll never forget you.' This was an unbelievable day and I'm glad to say she can have another day with us and I'm glad I was in the right place at the right time."

Tumpane, who grew up in the Chicago suburbs, got into umpiring as a teenager, made his major-league debut in 2012 and received his full-time MLB commission in 2016, stressed he's no hero.

"I just happened to be there," he said. "I think I've been a caring person in my life. I saw somebody in need, and it looked like a situation to obviously insert myself and help out."

The aftermath was a bit surreal. After the woman was taken away, Tumpane called his wife, his arms still shaking.

"Not too many times you call your wife and say you helped save somebody's life," he said. "A really special moment."

One that stayed with him even as he prepared to call balls and strikes behind home plate Wednesday night. During breaks in the action his eyes would drift to the bridge just a few hundred feet behind the center field wall at PNC Park.

"It's also hard when you stand back behind home plate and look and you see the bridge in the distance, In between innings and whatnot, just thinking of how things could have maybe been," he said. "Glad it was this way."

Tumpane has no experience in crisis management or suicide prevention. He's spent 16 years living the nomadic life of an umpire. Asked what was going through his head while he tried to coax the woman back to safety, Tumpane just shrugged his shoulders. How do you explain the unexplainable?

"I happened to be in the right spot at the right time," he said. "Tried to be as comforting as I could and talk her through it. Thankfully that was the outcome."

Best of MLB: Giants win after Jae-Gyun Hwang hits go-ahead HR in debut

Best of MLB: Giants win after Jae-Gyun Hwang hits go-ahead HR in debut

SAN FRANCISCO -- Jae-Gyun Hwang homered in his major league debut, a tiebreaking drive in the sixth inning that led the San Francisco Giants over Colorado 5-3 Wednesday and extended the Rockies' losing streak to a season-high eight games.

A 29-year-old who starred for South Korea's Lotte Giants, Hwang was brought up from Triple-A Sacramento before the game and inserted into the starting lineup at third base, batting fifth.

He grounded out in the second inning, hit a run-scoring grounder in the fourth that cut Colorado's lead to 2-1, then broke a 3-3 tie when he homered against Kyle Freeland (8-6). Hwang was given a standing ovation from fans as he rounded the bases and was mobbed by teammates when he got back to the dugout.

He took a called third strike in the eighth, completing a 1-for-4 day (see full recap).

Strasburg strikes out 13 in Nats’ win over Cubs
WASHINGTON -- Stephen Strasburg struck out 13 in seven innings, Bryce Harper had two doubles and two RBIs, and the Washington Nationals beat the Chicago Cubs 8-4 on Wednesday night.

Anthony Rendon and Matt Wieters hit back-to-back homers against John Lackey (5-9) during Washington's four-run second inning. After the Cubs pulled within three at 6-3, Daniel Murphy went deep in the fifth.

It was a rough day for the Cubs, who cut veteran catcher Miguel Montero after he criticized pitcher Jake Arrieta for his role in the Nationals' seven steals in Tuesday's 6-1 win over the World Series champions. Then reigning NL MVP Kris Bryant departed with an apparent right ankle injury.

Bryant awkwardly clipped third base while catching a foul pop off the bat of Wieters in the sixth. He walked around gingerly before being helped off the field (see full recap).

Indians top Rangers in Francona’s return
CLEVELAND -- Trevor Bauer pitched into the seventh inning, Michael Brantley drove in two runs and the Cleveland Indians defeated the Texas Rangers 5-3 on Wednesday night in manager Terry Francona's return to the team.

Francona was cleared to come back after another health scare forced him to leave Monday's game and miss Tuesday's contest. The 58-year-old Francona has been fitted with a heart monitor, but he said doctors have ruled out any serious health issues.

Bauer (7-6) held Texas to one run -- Robinson Chirinos' homer -- and four hits in 6 1/3 innings.

Brantley had RBI singles in the third and the seventh. Francisco Lindor, Jose Ramirez and Edwin Encarnacion also drove in runs.

Yu Darvish (6-6) gave up three runs -- two earned -- in six innings and has one win in his last seven starts.

Andrew Miller struck out four of the five batters he faced. Elvis Andrus hit a leadoff homer in the ninth off Cody Allen. Rougned Odor added an RBI single, but Allen struck out Chirinos to end the game.

Cleveland has won five of six against Texas this season (see full recap).