Instant Replay: Pirates 5, Phillies 3

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Instant Replay: Pirates 5, Phillies 3

BOX SCORE

Entering Wednesday’s game at Citizens Bank Park, the Phillies were 6-0 when leading after the sixth inning. They aren’t undefeated in that situation any longer.

After a sold start by Roy Halladay, the Phillies' bullpen gave up four runs in the final three innings and the Pirates won, 5-3.

Prior to Wednesday evening, the Phillies' 'pen had allowed one or no runs in 14 of the last 16 games. The Phillies, who have lost two in a row to Pittsburgh, fell to 9-13.

Starting pitching report
Halladay got off to an excellent start. He struck out the side in the first inning, and he retired the Pirates on just six pitches in the second inning. Halladay allowed only one base runner through the first three innings.

Halladay threw 95 pitches (57 for strikes) over six innings. He surrendered one hit, two walks, one earned run and struck out eight. Halladay, who entered the game with a 6.04 ERA, lowered that mark to 5.08.

Pirates starter Wandy Rodriguez -- who had a microscopic 0.56 ERA before Wednesday -- lasted 5 2/3 innings. He gave up nine hits, three earned runs, two walks and two home runs. He struck out five.

Bullpen report
Antonio Bastardo served up a home run to Pirates third baseman Pedro Alvarez in the seventh.

In the eighth, Mike Adams surrendered two walks and two singles and was yanked after facing just four batters. With no one out, Jeremy Horst replaced Adams. Horst gave up a single to Brandon Inge, which allowed Starling Marte to score and put the Pirates ahead, 4-3. Both runs in the inning were charged to Adams.

Horst gave up another run in the ninth when Chase Utley couldn’t track down a fly ball along the right-field line. Marte ended up with a triple on the play and Clint Barmes scored.

At the plate
Utley -- who was moved back to the two-hole in the order when Charlie Manuel decided to juggle his lineup -- hit a solo home run to right field in the first inning. Utley leads the team with four homers. Wednesday also marked the 10-year anniversary of his first big-league hit -- a grand slam against the Colorado Rockies.

Ryan Howard added a home run in the fourth when he smacked an 0-2 curveball into the right-field stands. It was his second homer of the year, and the first 0-2 pitch he’s hit out of any ballpark since 2008.

The blasts by Utley and Howard were the first home runs off a left-handed pitcher by the Phillies this season.

The Phils added another run in the sixth inning when Kevin Frandsen, pinch hitting for Halladay, singled up the middle to score Ben Revere.

The Pirates were led by Alvarez and Marte, who had two hits each and combined for three RBIs.

In the field
In the third inning, Utley made one of his best defensive plays in a while. Utley dove to his right on a ground ball by John McDonald and threw the Pirates' shortstop out at first.

Dom Brown made a spectacular diving catch in left field in the fifth inning to rob McDonald of another hit.

Up next
Cliff Lee (2-1, 2.83 ERA) will face Pirates right-hander James McDonald (2-2, 4.12) on Thursday at Citizens Bank Park. First pitch is scheduled for 1:05 p.m.

Brock Stassi, Daniel Nava make Phillies' roster; Jesmuel Valentin to AAA

Brock Stassi, Daniel Nava make Phillies' roster; Jesmuel Valentin to AAA

Brock Stassi and Daniel Nava have earned the Phillies' final two bench spots, according to CSN Philly's Jim Salisbury.

Infielder Jesmuel Valentin will head to Triple A.

Stassi, a left-handed hitting first baseman who can play some left field and right field, has hit .339 this spring with a team-leading six home runs and 17 RBIs.

Nava, the former Red Sox outfielder, hit .386 this spring and hit a three-run home run off Justin Verlander Wednesday to help solidify his spot on the Phillies' opening-day roster.

More coming ...

End could be near for Jimmy Rollins, who's unlikely to make Giants' roster

End could be near for Jimmy Rollins, who's unlikely to make Giants' roster

The long-expected homecoming for Jimmy Rollins didn't go as planned.

Rollins, now 38, is unlikely to make the San Francisco Giants' opening-day roster.

"We've talked to Jimmy and he knows the scenario and the situation," manager Bruce Bochy told reporters earlier this week. "We're just waiting to hear back from him."

J-Roll was hoping to catch on with the Giants as a utility infielder. San Francisco already has an everyday shortstop in Brandon Crawford, so Rollins' role would have been to back him up, play a little second base and perhaps some third base. 

But Rollins hit just .125 this spring and fell clearly behind fellow veteran Aaron Hill, who is three years younger and at this point simply a better hitter.

Is this the end for J-Roll? If it is, he'll finish with a .264/.324/.418 batting line in over 10,000 plate appearances, 2,455 hits, 511 doubles, 231 homers and 470 steals.

Rollins is one of just four players ever with that many career doubles and steals. The others are Barry Bonds, Ty Cobb and Paul Molitor.

While some players have precipitous drop-offs that lead to retirement -- forced or unforced -- Rollins' decline has been more gradual. His batting average has dipped in each of the last four seasons, from .252 in 2013 to .243 to .224 to .221 last season. 

Rollins latched on with the White Sox last spring and was their opening-day shortstop, but he was released on June 15 as Chicago made room for top prospect Tim Anderson.

Rollins, who played 15 seasons with the Phillies, is the franchise leader in at-bats, hits and doubles. He's second in steals, third in triples and runs scored, ninth in homers and eighth in RBIs.

He also won an MVP, a World Series, four Gold Gloves and made three All-Star teams.

Enough to make the Hall of Fame? That's obviously subjective, but for as much as he did for the Phillies and for how much he impacted the game for more than a decade, Rollins' rate stats -- namely the .251/.317/.395 batting line he posted from 2008-16 -- could keep him out of Cooperstown, even though some of his counting stats are more impressive than Barry Larkin's.