Kendrick's 2nd-half slide continues in Phils' loss

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Kendrick's 2nd-half slide continues in Phils' loss

BOX SCORE

WASHINGTON -- Throwing to contact for a pitcher can be a double-edged sword. On one side, a pitcher can avoid big innings with groundballs and double plays. By working quickly, he can keep the defense on its toes and dictate the rhythm of the game.

But on the other side, a ball put in play can be a dangerous thing.

For Kyle Kendrick and the Phillies on Friday night at Nationals Park, all of those balls put into play came back to bite them as the Nats rolled to a 6-1 victory (see Instant Replay).

It was the Nationals’ seventh straight win, which could move them to 4½ games of the Reds for the second wild-card spot. Meanwhile, the Phillies inched ever closer to that losing season. At 68-79, the Phillies can afford two more defeats in order to avoid their first losing season since 2002.

Kendrick, whose outing on Friday night exemplified his second half, will start at least three more of those remaining games.

Kendrick was charged with six runs on eight hits and a pair of walks in 4 1/3. He also allowed two solo homers to Wilson Ramos and the white-hot Ryan Zimmerman. Moreover, there wasn’t an inning in the five Kendrick started in which he did not allow at least one hit. After Ian Desmond bounced one off the plate to knock in a run and load the bases, manager Ryne Sandberg gave him the hook.

“I just didn’t do my job tonight,” Kendrick said. “I didn’t give us a chance to win and didn’t pitch deep into the game. The whole thing has been a rough second half.”

But has it been simply bad luck for the veteran righty? At 10-13, Kendrick has posted a 6.91 ERA since the All-Star Game and leads the National League in hits allowed. In his last nine starts covering all of August and September, Kendrick is 1-6 with a 6.90 ERA and has allowed 64 hits in 45 2/3 innings.

What happened to the guy who was 8-6 with a 3.68 ERA before the break?

According to Sandberg, Kendrick has lost his sinker. For a contact pitcher with no sinker, that means big trouble.

“The second half of the season, he hasn't had that two-seam fastball that has really good sinking action. It results in groundball outs or double-play opportunities,” Sandberg said. “It seems to be a little bit of a flatter pitch right now. Tonight, on the flip side, it seemed like they were on top of his pitches and he wasn't catching a break. They weren't hit hard enough.”

Kendrick would like to argue with that assessment, but he can’t. The two pitches that he threw to give up the homers were grooved over the plate. Sure, those choppers off the plate may have been bad luck, but sometimes a pitcher makes his own luck, too.

“I gave up a couple of homers and they were pitches up,” Kendrick said. “But other than that I gave up some groundballs in the hole. The walks aren’t good -- I walked a couple of guys and they ended up scoring. I have to keep going out there and making pitches. One pitch at a time.”

Then again, it wasn’t like the Phillies gave Kendrick much support. Facing Ross Ohlendorf, who was an emergency starter for righty Stephen Strasburg, the Phillies had a run and two on base with one out in the first.

After that, they didn’t cross the plate again.

The Phillies had runners on third and one out in the first, fourth and fifth innings. They also got the leadoff man on base in the sixth. Even that wasn’t enough to jumpstart the offense.

“Through five innings, we had men on third base with less than two outs and didn't get anybody in,” Sandberg said. “They got some guys on base and balls that didn't leave the infield were getting runs in. That was the big difference. It added up.”

With three more scheduled starts, Kendrick is pitching for a job next season. He gets high marks for making all 30 of his starts with a career-high 182 innings pitched and two complete games. Still, there is much to salvage for Kendrick in the remaining starts.

“At this point you want to throw better,” Kendrick said. “That’s the way it’s been in the second half, so I’ll just keep going out there.”

The series continues on Saturday night with a pair of lefties squaring off. Cole Hamels (7-13, 3.45) faces Gio Gonzalez (10-6, 3.31) in a battle of former Phillies’ prospects. Hamels is 1-1 with a 2.11 ERA in three starts against the Nats this season and 14-6 with a 2.52 ERA and 185 strikeouts in 178 2/3 innings against Washington in 27 career starts.

Gonzalez is 5-1 with a 2.22 ERA in seven career starts against the Phillies.

Brock Stassi, Daniel Nava make Phillies' roster; Jesmuel Valentin to AAA

Brock Stassi, Daniel Nava make Phillies' roster; Jesmuel Valentin to AAA

Brock Stassi and Daniel Nava have earned the Phillies' final two bench spots, according to CSN Philly's Jim Salisbury.

Infielder Jesmuel Valentin will head to Triple A.

Stassi, a left-handed hitting first baseman who can play some left field and right field, has hit .339 this spring with a team-leading six home runs and 17 RBIs.

Nava, the former Red Sox outfielder, hit .386 this spring and hit a three-run home run off Justin Verlander Wednesday to help solidify his spot on the Phillies' opening-day roster.

More coming ...

End could be near for Jimmy Rollins, who's unlikely to make Giants' roster

End could be near for Jimmy Rollins, who's unlikely to make Giants' roster

The long-expected homecoming for Jimmy Rollins didn't go as planned.

Rollins, now 38, is unlikely to make the San Francisco Giants' opening-day roster.

"We've talked to Jimmy and he knows the scenario and the situation," manager Bruce Bochy told reporters earlier this week. "We're just waiting to hear back from him."

J-Roll was hoping to catch on with the Giants as a utility infielder. San Francisco already has an everyday shortstop in Brandon Crawford, so Rollins' role would have been to back him up, play a little second base and perhaps some third base. 

But Rollins hit just .125 this spring and fell clearly behind fellow veteran Aaron Hill, who is three years younger and at this point simply a better hitter.

Is this the end for J-Roll? If it is, he'll finish with a .264/.324/.418 batting line in over 10,000 plate appearances, 2,455 hits, 511 doubles, 231 homers and 470 steals.

Rollins is one of just four players ever with that many career doubles and steals. The others are Barry Bonds, Ty Cobb and Paul Molitor.

While some players have precipitous drop-offs that lead to retirement -- forced or unforced -- Rollins' decline has been more gradual. His batting average has dipped in each of the last four seasons, from .252 in 2013 to .243 to .224 to .221 last season. 

Rollins latched on with the White Sox last spring and was their opening-day shortstop, but he was released on June 15 as Chicago made room for top prospect Tim Anderson.

Rollins, who played 15 seasons with the Phillies, is the franchise leader in at-bats, hits and doubles. He's second in steals, third in triples and runs scored, ninth in homers and eighth in RBIs.

He also won an MVP, a World Series, four Gold Gloves and made three All-Star teams.

Enough to make the Hall of Fame? That's obviously subjective, but for as much as he did for the Phillies and for how much he impacted the game for more than a decade, Rollins' rate stats -- namely the .251/.317/.395 batting line he posted from 2008-16 -- could keep him out of Cooperstown, even though some of his counting stats are more impressive than Barry Larkin's.