Lannan struggles in Phils' loss to MLB-best Bucs

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Lannan struggles in Phils' loss to MLB-best Bucs

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PITTSBURGH – Roy Halladay isn’t coming back for six more weeks at the earliest. Carlos Zambrano is out indefinitely with a shoulder injury. Tyler Cloyd has a 7.79 ERA at Lehigh Valley.

And then John Lannan pitches like this, and you can’t help but wonder what options the Phillies have.

"We need five starters, and he's one of them,” Charlie Manuel said in a somewhat less than ringing endorsement of the veteran right-hander. “I'm trying to think who we have who's better than him."

Lannan was hit hard for the third time in his last five starts Tuesday night, allowing 14 base runners -- 11 hits, three walks -- in just five innings in the Phillies’ 6-5 loss to the Pirates at PNC Park (see Instant Replay).

“I thought he was in trouble most every inning,” Manuel said. “They left nine guys on base [while he was in the game] and got 11 hits on him. That just shows you how many base runners they had.”

The big blow was Pedro Alvarez’s three-run bomb far over the wall in right-center in the fifth, his 21st homer of the season.

“If I make a different pitch to Alvarez, it’s a different ball game,” Lannan said. “That’s what it comes down to.”

But Lannan was hit hard all night. The 11 hits are the most he’s allowed in a game since June 27, 2011, with the Nationals, and they matched the most he’s allowed since 2008.

The last Phillie to allow 14 base runners in five or fewer innings was Joe Blanton against the Red Sox in 2010.

Not good company.

“He was trying to battle and keep us in the game,” Manuel said.

Lannan is now 1-3 in seven starts this year with an unsightly 5.15 ERA.

In his last five starts, he’s given up 17 earned runs in 23 2/3 innings -- a 6.46 ERA. And that’s with a seven-inning, one-run effort Friday in the Phillies’ 16-1 win over the Dodgers in Los Angeles.

Asked about his inconsistency, Lannan shrugged it off.

“I felt good today,” he said. “When you give up hits like that, you just have to keep on going. Felt good coming into it from the Dodgers start. Just giving up hits. That’s it.”

The Pirates stranded two in the first, three in the second, two in the third, one in the fourth and one in the fifth while Lannan was in the game.

“You have to keep going out there and making pitches,” Lannan said. “Up until [the Alvarez homer], I was able to battle through it. I left a ball up to Alvarez and you pay for it.”

What options do the Phillies have if they’ve had enough of Lannan, who was 42-52 in six years with the Nationals and has never won more than 10 games in a season?

The best option might be Ethan Martin, the 24-year-old right-hander who’s 9-3 with a 4.57 ERA at Lehigh Valley but has walked 52 batters in 86 2/3 innings.

But it’s clear that the Phillies, now 40-45 and 8½ back in the wild-card standings, can’t afford to keep running Lannan out there every fifth day too much longer if things don’t change.

Asked about Lannan’s lack of consistency, Manuel answered in general terms about the entire team’s lack of consistency.

“We talk about that all the time,” he said. “That’s what we’ve been all season. That’s how we play. It is kind of what our team so far has been. That’s why we can’t put a winning streak together, and we have a hard time staying above .500 and stuff like that.”

Lannan also hurt the Phillies by failing to score from first on a two-out double by Chase Utley in the third.

“I’m pretty slow,” Lannan said. “I don’t know what else to say. I got thrown out.”

The Phillies actually had a decent night at the plate, with 11 hits and five runs, two on Domonic Brown’s 22nd homer with two outs in the top of the ninth off National League save leader Jason Grilli.

“Just looking for a ball up to drive, that’s it,” Brown said. “I knew I took a good swing at it. Tough loss. Kind of frustrating.”

The bullpen once again failed the Phils, with Phillippe Aumont allowing two runs in the sixth after the Phillies had closed to within one run at 4-3 in the top of the inning.

The big blow was Andrew McCutchen’s triple, one of five times the brilliant 26-year-old outfielder reached base.

“I left a couple of pitches over the plate -- the sinker wasn’t running enough, especially on McCutchen,” Aumont said. “It was just a battle, trying to keep it up. It was one of those situations where I was battling and just tired from the start. The heat got to me a little bit.

“It was one of those nights where I was in my own way. I didn’t make the quality pitches I need to make. It was a tough night.”

Pete Mackanin: 'I still don't know if I'll be here next year'

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USA Today Images

Pete Mackanin: 'I still don't know if I'll be here next year'

Pete Mackanin may have received a contract extension in May, but the Phillies' manager has yet to receive assurances from general manager Matt Klentak that he’ll return in 2018. 

“I still don’t know if I’ll be here next year,” Mackanin said before Monday’s game against the Washington Nationals.

Mackanin took over midway through the 2015 season and has presided over the Phillies’ rebuilding project. He went 37-51 to finish 2015, 71-91 last year and was 62-94 heading into the final week of the season. 

Does Mackanin hope Klentak tells him his fate soon? 

“Of course,” Mackanin said. “I’m signed through next year and I assume I’ll be here. But you never know what they’re going to do.”

Mackanin said he’s set to meet with Klentak on Saturday to evaluate players. The season ends the next day, with the Phillies needing one victory over their final six games to avoid their first 100-loss season since 1961. 

“Do you need better coaches? Do you need a better manager? The answer to all these questions is you need better players,” Mackanin said as he quizzed about his future. 

Despite the dismal record, the Phillies have made progress in many areas. They may have found their future star power hitter in Rhys Hoskins. Fellow rookie Nick Williams has shown flashes. Cesar Hernandez is hitting .296. Freddy Galvis is a Gold Glove-caliber shortstop. Adam Morgan has pitched like a permanent setup man (see story). Mackanin believes Aaron Nola has established himself as a “solid No. 3 starter.” 

But the rest of the rotation is uncertain. They still need more offense. And while the Phillies have played well down the stretch, it’s come with no pressure in a sea of meaningless games.

Mackanin was asked if the team made a step forward this season. 

“I think individual players have made a step forward. As a team, of course not. We’re down at the bottom,” Mackanin said. “On the other hand, there are teams with similar records with much higher payrolls that we’re expected to do much better and haven’t. And when you look at the makeup of the team with all the pitchers that we’ve used and injuries, we’ve had a lot of unproven players.”

Mackanin revealed the angriest he’s been was back in May, when the Phillies went 6-22. He said while he's trying to keep an “even keel,” he gave his team a tongue-lashing after a home loss during that stretch. 

“I just went down the list of players,” Mackanin said. “Every one of them, I pointed out all the good things they’ve done to get here. And I asked after I got done naming every player how good they’ve been and what they’ve accomplished to get here, I asked, ‘How come we’re so bad?’”

Despite injuries and having to rush players to the majors, the Phillies were 33-36 since the All-Star break before Monday’s game. 

Mackanin acknowledged 2018 will be different, when the record will matter much more. He believes it’s time for the franchise to start winning in order to lure the potential free agents needed to become a contender again. 

“We’ve got a ways to go,” Mackanin said. “We’ve got players who have to prove they’re for real. Next year will tell us an awful lot.”

The 66-year-old Mackanin hopes he’s around to see what happens. 

“Blame the managers and coaches. How about if the players perform better?” Mackanin said. “Now, could we get the players to perform better? Everybody tries hard to do that.” 

Tonight's Lineup: Tommy Joseph out, Rhys Hoskins back to 1B in opener vs. Nationals

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CSN

Tonight's Lineup: Tommy Joseph out, Rhys Hoskins back to 1B in opener vs. Nationals

The Phillies need just one more win to avoid losing 100 games this season. They'll hope to get it Monday night when they open their series against the Nationals.

Pete Mackanin has made several adjustments to the lineup that beat Atlanta on Sunday, 2-0, behind a strong start from Nick Pivetta (see observations).

Tommy Joseph is out, which means that Rhys Hoskins returns to first base. Hoskins is going through a rough stretch over the last few days, as he has only two hits in his last 17 at-bats.

Despite going 2 for 3 Sunday, Jorge Alfaro is replaced by Andrew Knapp, who plays for the first time since last Wednesday. Mackanin seems to be trying to give all three of his catchers chances to play over the final weeks of the season.

Aaron Altherr shifts down from second to fifth in the lineup. Altherr is hitting .289 vs. righties this season, compared to .236 against lefties. The Phillies face a righty tonight in Washington's A.J. Cole. In two appearances against the Phillies this year, Cole has allowed only one run in eight innings.

Aaron Nola kicks off the Phillies' final homestand on the mound. He has been stellar this year at Citizens Bank Park, where he is 9-4 with a 2.98 ERA. Nola has started against the Nationals three times in 2017, sporting a 1-0 record and 3.31 ERA in those outings. 

The Phillies' lineup can be found below: 

Phillies
1. Cesar Hernandez, 2B
2. Freddy Galvis, SS
3. Nick Williams, RF
4. Rhys Hoskins, 1B
5. Aaron Altherr, LF
6. Odubel Herrera, CF
7. Maikel Franco, 3B
8. Andrew Knapp, C
9. Aaron Nola, SP

And the Nationals' lineup:

Nationals
1. Trea Turner, SS
2. Wilmer Difo, 3B
3. Ryan Zimmerman, 1B
4. Adam Lind, LF
5. Jayson Werth, RF
6. Michael Taylor, CF
7. Matt Wieters, C
8. Adrian Sanchez, 2B
9. A.J. Cole, P