MLB Notes: Mets, Yoenis Cespedes agree to 4-year, $110M deal

MLB Notes: Mets, Yoenis Cespedes agree to 4-year, $110M deal

NEW YORK — A person familiar with the negotiations tells The Associated Press that outfielder Yoenis Cespedes and the New York Mets have agreed to a $110 million, four-year contract.

The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity Tuesday because the agreement is subject to Cespedes successfully completing a physical.

The 31-year-old Cespedes gets a full no-trade provision as part of the agreement. The deal's $27.5 million average annual value ties former Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez for the second-highest among position players, trailing only Miguel Cabrera's $29.2 million with Detroit.

Acquired by the Mets from Detroit at the July 31 trade deadline in 2015, Cespedes became a free agent a year ago, agreed to a $75 million, three-year deal with the Mets and then opted out after one season and $27.5 million.

Brewers: Carter DFA'd after 41-HR season
MILWAUKEE — The Milwaukee Brewers signed free agent Eric Thames, who spent the last three seasons in Korea, and designated slugging first baseman Chris Carter for assignment on Tuesday.

Carter tied for the National League lead in home runs with 41 in 2016, his one season with the Brewers. He is eligible for arbitration.

Carter will apparently be replaced by Thames, a first baseman-outfielder who signed a three-year contract with a club option for 2020.

The 30 year-old Thames hit .348 with 124 home runs, 379 RBIs and 64 steals in 388 games with NC Dinos of the Korean Baseball Organization.

General manager David Stearns said Thames' left-handed bat and versatility was a good fit in the lineup for the rebuilding club.

Thames spent two seasons in the majors, hitting. 250 with 21 homers with Toronto and Seattle in 2011-12. The Blue Jays drafted Thames in the seventh round of the 2008 draft.

Thames could add a left-handed contact hitter to the middle of Milwaukee's lineup, which is primarily right-handed. He was the most valuable player in the Korean league after becoming the first person in league history to have at least 40 home runs and 40 stolen bases.

The Brewers signed the 29-year-old Carter last season to a one-year, $2.5 million contract after he spent his three seasons with Houston.

He's likely in line for a raise for his 41 homers and 94 RBIs, despite hitting .222 in 160 games last season with the Brewers. Carter also had an NL-high 206 strikeouts.

Mets promote Tim Tebow to high Class A St. Lucie

Mets promote Tim Tebow to high Class A St. Lucie

COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Tim Tebow is moving up and heading south -- to some very familiar territory.

Tebow has been promoted to the New York Mets' high Class A affiliate in St. Lucie, Florida. The 29-year-old Tebow led the University of Florida to two national championships in football and won the 2007 Heisman Trophy during his stellar career with the Gators.

"I'm not sure how much of an additional challenge it will be," Mets general manager Sandy Alderson said Sunday in San Francisco. "Clearly it's a step up. I certainly think he can handle it."

Tebow began his first pro baseball season with Class A Columbia, drawing huge crowds at home and wherever the Fireflies went in the South Atlantic League. He entered his final Fireflies game batting .222 with three home runs and 23 RBIs.

"I wouldn't say he has excelled there, but at the same time, what he's done there -- given all the circumstances -- justified the promotion to Port St. Lucie," Alderson said.

Phillies play wait-and-see game with Jerad Eickhoff and Howie Kendrick

Phillies play wait-and-see game with Jerad Eickhoff and Howie Kendrick

PHOENIX -- Jerad Eickhoff and Howie Kendrick both tested their achy body parts on Sunday.

Eickhoff, on the disabled list with an upper back strain, threw two 15-pitch "innings" in the bullpen and was pleased with the results.

"It felt good, no sense of pulling," he said. "We'll see how it feels tomorrow."

Eickhoff's turn in the rotation will come up Wednesday in Seattle. If he can't make the start, Mark Leiter Jr. will. Leiter pitched six shutout innings in his first big-league start on Friday night.

As for Kendrick, who is battling left hamstring tightness, he was not in the starting lineup for a fourth straight game on Sunday. He did run some sprints under the watchful eye of head athletic trainer Scott Sheridan before the game.

"He still feels it, but he's available to pinch-hit," manager Pete Mackanin said.

Is this getting close to being a situation that would require a trip to the disabled list?

"Hopefully not," Mackanin said. "Hopefully he's better tomorrow. If not, I'm hoping he can at least DH in Seattle (on Tuesday). He's one of our best hitters and I want to get him in there. But I've got to be cautious."

Kendrick already spent six weeks on the disabled list with an abdominal injury earlier this season. He's played well when healthy, hitting .355 (43 for 121) with a .414 on-base percentage in 31 games.

The Phillies need to be certain that Kendrick is healthy when they turn him loose because he could hold some trade value in the month of July and a full-blown injury would hurt that.