No win for Sandberg, but his prize is coming

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No win for Sandberg, but his prize is coming

BOX SCORE

Ryne Sandberg did not get a win for his 54th birthday Wednesday night, but his prize will be coming soon.

It seems to be a fait accompli that Sandberg will lose the interim tag and be named full-time Phillies manager sometime in the next week or so. An announcement could come before the Phillies close out the season Sept. 29 in Atlanta or shortly thereafter.

Whatever the case, you can bet the kids’ tuition money that Sandberg is the guy.

He even seems to know it.

He didn’t sound like a man uncertain of where he’ll be next year as he talked about Wednesday night’s 4-3 loss to the Miami Marlins (see Instant Replay).

Chase Utley had two RBIs, giving him 10 in his last three games.

After the game, Sandberg spoke positively about the way Utley has been swinging the bat.

“He’s had a solid year,” Sandberg said. “He’s swinging a real good bat. He’s shown his power, shown his leadership. He’s played a lot this year and all that’s good. He’s a mainstay out there and a steady force. He’s a big piece for next year. He’s showing the type of player that he is and expect no less next year.”

That was two references to next year in two sentences.

Sounds like a man who knows where he’s going to be, a man who will soon get his prize, right?

We know. This is hardly earth-shattering stuff. Sandberg was the heir to Charlie Manuel’s throne from the time he was elevated to third base coach after last season. Before that even. In his month as Manuel’s replacement, Sandberg has overseen 18 wins, 14 losses, lots of life and a bunch of late-game rallies. He’s solidified his status.

There was no late-game rally for the Phils on Wednesday night, however.

Miami’s Ed Lucas smacked a solo homer off lefty Cesar Jimenez in the top of the 10th inning to break a 3-3 tie and propel the Marlins to the win.

The Phils tried to rally in the bottom of the inning. Carlos Ruiz began the frame by reaching base on an error and Domonic Brown followed with a double. Second and third, no outs. Then bases loaded, one out. The Phils came up empty as Steve Cishek pitched into trouble and out of trouble to preserve the win.

“It was frustrating at the end,” Sandberg said. “We couldn’t execute and get anyone in.”

Manuel said that a time or two the last few seasons.

Sandberg was asked if he had any fresh solutions to getting runners home from third with less than two outs.

“Just for the hitters to remember the pressure is on the pitcher,” he said. “Stay within the strike zone, be patient, relax, all of the things we talk about. Some of them are young hitters. It’s a learning experience for them. We’ll continue to work at it. In some cases in the last month, we’ve had key hits in those situations also.”

Just not in this game.

The Phils also left a runner at third in the eighth and ninth innings.

In the eighth, Marlins’ shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria made a sensational diving play to take away what looked like a tie-breaking hit from Roger Bernadina.

“Their shortstop made an unbelievable play,” Sandberg said. “We thought the ball was in left field. It was a game-saver.”

Lucas’ longball wasn’t the only one that hurt the Phillies. With Kyle Kendrick scratched (see story), the Phillies used seven relievers to get through the game. Rookie Ethan Martin gave up a two-run lead in the sixth when he surrendered a mammoth two-run homer to Giancarlo Stanton. The blast made it a 3-3 game.

Stanton’s homer was last seen stopping in for an Italian special -- sweet, no hot -- at Planet Hoagie out on Ashburn Alley. The estimated distance of the blast was 460 feet.

Stanton hit a slider.

“I didn’t make a great pitch,” Martin said. “That kind of guy is going to do that.”

Tonight's lineup: Cesar Hernandez, Tommy Joseph, Cameron Rupp back in after day off

Tonight's lineup: Cesar Hernandez, Tommy Joseph, Cameron Rupp back in after day off

The Phillies, winners of six straight, are using a more traditional lineup for tonight's series open in Los Angeles against the Dodgers.

Cesar Hernandez, Tommy Joseph, and Cameron Rupp are all back in the lineup after getting Thursday afternoon off against the Marlins. Hernandez is back in his usual leadoff spot, while Joseph is hitting seventh and Rupp eighth. Freddy Galvis is back in the two-hole.

Maikel Franco will look to continue his hot streak tonight against Dodgers starter Kenta Maeda. Franco is 9 for 23 with a double, two homers, 10 RBIs, three walks and just one strikeout during the Phillies' current winning streak.

Franco is 2 for 5 with a strikeout and two singles in his career against Maeda.

Here is the Phillies' full lineup.

1. Cesar Hernandez, 2B
2. Freddy Galvis, SS
3. Odubel Herrera, CF
4. Maikel Franco, 3B
5. Michael Saunders, RF
6. Aaron Altherr, LF
7. Tommy Joseph, 1B
8. Cameron Rupp, C
9. Jerad Eickhoff, P

And the Dodgers' lineup:

1. Andrew Toles, CF
2. Corey Seager, SS
3. Justin Turner, 3B
4. Adrian Gonzalez, 1B
5. Yasmani Grandal, C
6. Chase Utley, 2B
7. Cody Bellinger, LF
8. Enrique Hernandez, RF
9. Kenta Maeda, P

For more on tonight's game, check out Corey Seidman's game notes.

Phillies-Dodgers 5 things: Next 15 games will show us who the Phils are

Phillies-Dodgers 5 things: Next 15 games will show us who the Phils are

Phillies (11-9) at Dodgers (11-12)
10:10 p.m. on The Comcast Network; streaming live on CSNPhilly.com and the NBC Sports App

Draft, schmaft. The streaking Phillies are the best story in town.

OK, maybe not until Monday. But there's a buzz around this Phillies team, which has won six games in a row but begins a tough road trip Friday night in L.A.

Let's take a look:

1. Daunting stretch commences
The Phillies played well for the first seven weeks last season and carried a 25-19 record into a difficult road trip through Detroit and Chicago.

They won one game on that trip, beginning a stretch of 19 losses in 24 games. With that, their season was effectively over.

"We've just got to continue that for a little bit longer than we did last year," Pete Mackanin said after Thursday's win.

It won't be easy. The Phillies have three at Dodger Stadium, then four at Wrigley Field against the defending champion-Cubs, then they play six of their next eight against the Nationals, who've been the best team in baseball this month. (They also have a two-game series with the Mariners in there.)

Even if the Phils go something like 6-9 during this upcoming stretch, they'd emerge out of it 17-18, which would be a more-than-respectable start given the difficulty of their early-season schedule.

The good news is that after facing the Nationals six more times the next two weeks, the Phillies don't play them again until September.

2. Be like Maik
Maikel Franco's hot bat has carried the Phillies over the last week. 

During the six-game winning streak, he's gone 9 for 23 (.391) with a double, two homers, 10 RBIs, three walks and just one strikeout. The grand slam was great but the best sign has been the way he's used the whole field and not gotten himself out.

Franco is hitting mistake-pitches right now. It's something we haven't seen him do consistently the last two seasons because of his over-aggressiveness.

This hot streak won't last forever — in fact, it might not even make the trip out West. But Franco has indeed shown that when he's seeing the ball well, he can carry an offense. We used to say that often about the Phillies' previous cleanup hitter, didn't we?

3. Also, be like Eick
The Phillies have played so well the last week that even the national folks at MLB Network took notice Thursday night.

Greg Amsinger, Dan Plesac and Eric Byrnes did two whole segments on the Phillies, and at the end of one of them Plesac said that, "When this team is ready to contend again, Jerad Eickhoff will be front and center."

Eickhoff is finally getting some recognition.

Every athlete in every sport will tell you consistency is what they seek the most. It's as cliche as it gets, and it's usually meaningless because nothing in sports is totally consistent. You're hot for a few weeks, teams adjust, a cold spell begins, etc.

Well, Eickhoff is totally consistent. He's pitched six or more innings in 26 of 37 starts the last two seasons and he's allowed three earned runs or less in 31 of them.

Every fifth day, the Phillies know what they're going to get: at least six quality innings that keep them in the game and provide them a chance for a late win.

The Phils never seem to hit for Eickhoff, who is 0-1 this season despite stellar numbers: a 2.55 ERA, 1.05 WHIP, more than a strikeout per inning and a .200 opponents' batting average.

Eickhoff has been considerably better at home than on the road during his brief career, posting a 2.95 ERA at Citizens Bank Park and a 3.80 ERA everywhere else.

He's never pitched at Dodger Stadium, a ballpark that definitely favors pitchers.

Eickhoff's lone meeting with the Dodgers came last August. It was one of the few games he allowed more than four runs, but the Phillies actually provided some offense to get him off the hook. He struck out eight but was taken deep by Justin Turner and Yasmani Grandal.

4. A look at the Dodgers
Over are the days when the Dodgers had too many productive outfielders to play at one time. Matt Kemp has been traded twice, Andre Ethier can't get on the field, Joc Pederson is on the DL and Yasiel Puig has become a mediocre player.

The Dodgers' lineup looks a lot different these days, especially with first baseman Adrian Gonzalez shelved temporarily with a forearm injury that's bothered him for months.

Turner and Corey Seager are the two standouts in L.A.'s lineup. 

It's often mentioned that the Mets shouldn't have let Daniel Murphy walk, but losing Turner hurt nearly as much. Since signing with the Dodgers in 2014, Turner has hit .300/.368/.491 with 90 doubles, 50 home runs and 201 RBIs in 407 games. He's coming off an insane second half last season and leads the NL with nine doubles.

Seager has so far lived up to every bit of hype. In 898 plate appearances, he's hit .312 with a .900 OPS. He walks, he has massive power, he hits doubles (40 last season) and plays really good defense.

The key to holding the Dodgers in check is getting past that 2-3 of Seager and Turner. The rest of the lineup is lacking right now with Gonzalez, Pederson and Logan Forsythe banged up.

The Dodgers earlier this week called up one of their top prospects in first baseman Cody Bellinger. He's 1 for 10 with five strikeouts through three games. He entered the season as Baseball America's No. 7 prospect in the majors. The guy has hit bombs at every minor-league level.

5. Phils face Maeda
• The Phillies will face second-year Japanese right-hander Kenta Maeda, who went 16-11 with a 3.48 ERA last season but hasn't pitched well yet in 2017. In four starts, he's 1-2 with a 8.05 ERA and has allowed seven home runs in 19 innings.

Maeda doesn't go too deep into games. He's lasted less than six innings in 21 of his 36 starts with the Dodgers.

Maeda got the win both times he faced the Phillies last season but didn't pitch particularly well either time. He gave up five runs in 11 innings on four homers. The home runs were hit by Aaron Altherr, Freddy Galvis, Cesar Hernandez and Cameron Rupp.

Galvis and Hernandez each reached base against him three times.

Maeda has five pitches: a four-seam fastball, slider, changeup, sinker and curveball. He primarily uses the fastball and slider against righties but will throw any of those pitches to a lefty. The changeup has been by far his best pitch in the majors (.204 opponents' batting average, no home runs allowed) and the curveball has been by far his worst (.383).