Pete Rose is Phillies' 2017 Wall of Fame inductee

Pete Rose is Phillies' 2017 Wall of Fame inductee

It's not much of a surprise, but the Phillies officially announced Monday that Pete Rose will be the organization's 2017 Wall of Fame inductee.

Rose will be inducted during an on-field ceremony before the Phillies' 7:05 p.m. game against the Mets on Saturday, Aug. 12.

"I am very honored to be inducted into the Phillies Wall of Fame," Rose said in a statement. "My baseball years in Philadelphia were amazing, not just because we won it all in 1980 and came close in 1983, but also because the fans welcomed me from day one. The team's great ownership and talented roster attracted me to Philadelphia as a free agent.  I knew we could experience great success."

Rose, baseball's all-time hits king, was one of the stars on the Reds' Big Red Machine, a club that won back-to-back World Series in 1975 and 1976. He came to the Phillies as a free agent before the 1979 season. He spent five years with the Phils and his leadership was key in getting a talented team over the top on its way to winning the 1980 World Series.

"He made a big difference in our lineup obviously," said Phillies bench coach Larry Bowa, a former teammate of Rose's. "It's not like we didn't have a good team before he got here but he was like the missing ingredient.

"When he came over here, he told everybody that when teams came in to play us that we were an intimidating team and a lot of people on our team didn't believe that. But he just kept saying it and saying it until we believed it."

Rose was placed on baseball's permanently ineligible list in 1989 after he admitted to wagering on baseball during his time as manager of the Cincinnati Reds. The ban precludes him from appearing on the ballot for the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York.

Rose is still on the ineligible list, but commissioner Rob Manfred has shown some leniency in recent years and Rose has been able to participate in some ceremonies, such as his induction into the Reds' Hall of Fame last June.

"I think hindsight being 20-20, if Pete would have come out earlier and said, 'I made a mistake,' he'd probably be in the Hall of Fame," Bowa said. "He'll be the first to tell you he made a mistake at that."

Transgressions included, Phillies fans still remember Rose fondly, and Bowa thinks he'll get a very warm reception on Aug. 12.

"It'll be electric because these people loved the way he played," he said. "He didn't consider himself a superstar, he considered himself a blue-collar player that had to work for everything. 

"He played the game with reckless abandon. I saw him play through a hamstring pull. Stuff like that -- when I watch other guys go through injuries and don't get off the field -- that means a lot."

Mets promote Tim Tebow to high Class A St. Lucie

Mets promote Tim Tebow to high Class A St. Lucie

COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Tim Tebow is moving up and heading south -- to some very familiar territory.

Tebow has been promoted to the New York Mets' high Class A affiliate in St. Lucie, Florida. The 29-year-old Tebow led the University of Florida to two national championships in football and won the 2007 Heisman Trophy during his stellar career with the Gators.

"I'm not sure how much of an additional challenge it will be," Mets general manager Sandy Alderson said Sunday in San Francisco. "Clearly it's a step up. I certainly think he can handle it."

Tebow began his first pro baseball season with Class A Columbia, drawing huge crowds at home and wherever the Fireflies went in the South Atlantic League. He entered his final Fireflies game batting .222 with three home runs and 23 RBIs.

"I wouldn't say he has excelled there, but at the same time, what he's done there -- given all the circumstances -- justified the promotion to Port St. Lucie," Alderson said.

Phillies play wait-and-see game with Jerad Eickhoff and Howie Kendrick

Phillies play wait-and-see game with Jerad Eickhoff and Howie Kendrick

PHOENIX -- Jerad Eickhoff and Howie Kendrick both tested their achy body parts on Sunday.

Eickhoff, on the disabled list with an upper back strain, threw two 15-pitch "innings" in the bullpen and was pleased with the results.

"It felt good, no sense of pulling," he said. "We'll see how it feels tomorrow."

Eickhoff's turn in the rotation will come up Wednesday in Seattle. If he can't make the start, Mark Leiter Jr. will. Leiter pitched six shutout innings in his first big-league start on Friday night.

As for Kendrick, who is battling left hamstring tightness, he was not in the starting lineup for a fourth straight game on Sunday. He did run some sprints under the watchful eye of head athletic trainer Scott Sheridan before the game.

"He still feels it, but he's available to pinch-hit," manager Pete Mackanin said.

Is this getting close to being a situation that would require a trip to the disabled list?

"Hopefully not," Mackanin said. "Hopefully he's better tomorrow. If not, I'm hoping he can at least DH in Seattle (on Tuesday). He's one of our best hitters and I want to get him in there. But I've got to be cautious."

Kendrick already spent six weeks on the disabled list with an abdominal injury earlier this season. He's played well when healthy, hitting .355 (43 for 121) with a .414 on-base percentage in 31 games.

The Phillies need to be certain that Kendrick is healthy when they turn him loose because he could hold some trade value in the month of July and a full-blown injury would hurt that.