Phillies' bullpen finds a way in win vs. Pirates

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Phillies' bullpen finds a way in win vs. Pirates

PITTSBURGH -- Charlie Manuel just kept trotting them out there. One after another after another.

Jake Diekman for two batters, Phillipe Aumont for four, J.C. Ramirez for two, Antonio Bastardo for three, Justin DeFratus for one, Jonathan Papelbon for three.
 
Six relievers, 10 outs.
 
“I used 'em all, didn’t I?” Manuel said laughing. “I had [Joe] Savery left, I guess.”
 
It wasn’t easy. It wasn’t pretty.

Diekman, Aumont, Ramirez and Bastardo allowed a combined six of 11 batters to reach base, but the beleaguered Phillies' bullpen cobbled together 3 1/3 scoreless innings in relief of Jonathan Pettibone Tuesday night, and the Phillies ended the Pirates’ nine-game winning streak with a 3-1 win at PNC Park (see Instant Replay).
 
The Phillies entered the day with the second-worst bullpen ERA in baseball, and general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said before the game he’d like to acquire bullpen help.
 
“Very expensive, and a lot of people are looking for the same thing,” he said. “But I would have interest in proven bullpen, if I could.”
 
But for one night, the Phils’ young bullpen got it done. Somehow.
 
“The guys that are there, we do have limited experience, and so for us it’s more about just getting out there and keep getting the opportunities, keep getting the opportunities,” said De Fratus, who got a huge out with the bases loaded to end the eighth.
 
“We have some very talented arms down there, I firmly believe that, and it’s just a matter of getting those experiences, learning to bump our head.
 
“Sometimes, it’s not fun, those experiences, but you’ve got to have them to move forward, and the more we do that the better we’re going to become, because there’s a lot of talented arms down there, and we have the potential to be very good. There’s no reason we can’t be very good.”
 
It was DeFratus who took the loss on the Phils’ first three losses on their West Coast swing. He faced 15 batters in those three games, allowing 11 of them to reach base and four of them to score.

He only got four outs.
 
“When you failed before and you’ve felt that feeling, there’s nothing to be afraid of anymore, you know what I mean?” DeFratus said.
 
“It’s unfortunate that you do have to fail to learn that lesson, but I didn’t die. So there’s nothing to be worried about out there. You just go out there and throw the ball over the plate as hard as you can and let’s go.”
 
Tuesday night, facing the team with the best record in baseball, De Fratus entered the game with the bases loaded and two outs in the bottom of the eighth and struck out .285 hitter Jordy Mercer on five pitches.
 
De Fratus pumped his fist as he stepped off the mound and the several thousand Phillies fans who made the trip across the state stood and cheered.
 
“That feeling at the end of that inning, that’s why as relievers we play baseball,” he said. “That feeling. That’s the feeling we chase. The only way to get that feeling is to get out of a jam, so we invite those situations. It’s an amazing feeling.”
 
De Fratus had a 2.57 ERA before the West Coast trip. He came back east with a 4.50 ERA.
 
That’s what three straight awful appearances can do.
 
“Here’s a chance to redeem yourself, get it done,” he said. “I do feed off the fact that people have thought that they beat me. I’m not going to get angry, I just get it done.
 
“I’ve been beaten plenty of times in the minors and I got through it. So just see yourself through it. I’m going to go out there and I’m going to grind it out every time.”
 
Papelbon then worked a 1-2-3 ninth to earn his 16th save, and the Phillies handed the Pirates their first loss since June 19 in Cincinnati and evened their record at 4-4 on the 10-game road trip.
 
And the bullpen, lugging around an ungainly 4.60 ERA, had itself a rare effective if ugly line score: 3 1/3 innings, three hits, three walks and no runs.
 
“Yeah, we got it done,” Manuel said. “But it was kind of hard to watch.”
 
Manuel said he didn’t want to use Papelbon in the eighth but admitted, “It was tempting as hell.”
 
Pettitbone allowed only three hits in 5 2/3 but walked three and ran up a pitch count of 102 before running out of steam on a muggy day. Manuel yanked him after he allowed a solo homer to Garrett Jones with two outs in the sixth.
 
“They picked me up big time tonight,” Pettibone said of the 'pen. “Maybe the last couple of games haven’t gone their way, so it was good for them to get back on track.”
 
The Phils scored all their runs in the sixth on an RBI single by Ryan Howard, a sac fly by Domonic Brown and an RBI double by Delmon Young that scored Howard from first.
 
Howard said after the game his knee was quite sore after running the bases.
 
“It felt good to get out there and get a knock and pick the team up,” he said. “My knee hurts now.”

MLB Notes: Red Sox acquire ace LHP Chris Sale from White Sox

MLB Notes: Red Sox acquire ace LHP Chris Sale from White Sox

OXON HILL, Md. -- All-Star ace Chris Sale is joining the reloading Boston Red Sox, leaving behind his shredded reputation with the Chicago White Sox.

Boston acquired Sale on Tuesday for a package of four prospects, including high-priced Yoan Moncada.

Sale was a top trade target at the winter meetings and the AL East champion Red Sox were getting him instead of Washington, which also pursued.

A few hours earlier, Boston got prime setup man Tyler Thornburg from Milwaukee. After that deal was announced, without tipping his hand, Red Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said: "We're trying to win now, as you can see."

Boston acquired Sale for minor league pitchers Michael Kopech and Victor Diaz, outfielder Luis Basabe and Moncada, a third baseman (see full story).

Red Sox get setup man Thornburg from Brewers for INF Shaw
OXON HILL, Md. -- The Boston Red Sox have gotten the setup man they wanted, acquiring right-hander Tyler Thornburg from the Milwaukee Brewers in a package that included infielder Travis Shaw.

The deal was announced Tuesday and was the first trade at baseball's winter meetings.

Milwaukee also got minor league infielder Mauricio Dubon, minor league right-hander Josh Pennington and a player to be named or $100.

The 28-year-old Thornburg will become Boston's eighth-inning guy, setting up closer Craig Kimbrel for the AL East champions. Thornburg was 8-5 with 13 saves and a 2.15 ERA in 67 games for the Brewers, striking out 90 in 67 innings.

The 26-year-old Shaw hit .242 with 16 home runs and 71 RBIs last season. He mostly played third base, and also saw time at first.

The 22-year-old Dubon hit a combined .323 and scored 101 runs between the Single-A and Double-A levels. The 21-year-old Pennington was 5-3 with a 2.86 ERA in Class A (see full story).

Yankees to retire Jeter's No 2 on May 14, last single digit
NEW YORK -- Derek Jeter's No. 2 is being retired, the last of the New York Yankees' single digits.

The Yankees said Tuesday the number will be retired on May 14 before a Mother's Day game against Houston, and a plaque in his honor will be unveiled in Monument Park during the ceremony.

Jeter's number is the 21st retired by the team. He won five World Series titles and was a 14-time All-Star during a 20-season career that ended in 2014 and he is sixth in career hits with 3,465.

Jeter set Yankees records for hits, games (2,747), at-bats (11,195), doubles (544) and stolen bases (358) (see full story).

Cesar Hernandez remains a person of interest as Phillies look to improve

Cesar Hernandez remains a person of interest as Phillies look to improve

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — The Phillies have completed the signing of veteran reliever Joaquin Benoit to a one-year, $7.5 million contract (see story). The deal could be announced Tuesday and will require the club removing a player from the already-full 40-man roster.

Benoit is one of three additions that the Phils have made to their bullpen this offseason — the club traded for veteran right-hander Pat Neshek and picked up lefty David Rollins on waivers — and more will likely come, probably on minor-league contracts, before the team reports to spring training.

Now that the bullpen has been addressed, let’s take a look at what could be next for the Phillies this winter.

• The addition of Benoit could create enough back-end bullpen depth that GM Matt Klentak could look to trade either Jeanmar Gomez or Hector Neris. Gomez saved 37 games in 2016, but struggled down the stretch. Neris showed great promise in recording a 2.58 ERA and striking out 11.4 batters per nine innings in 79 games in 2016. The hard-throwing righty is young (27), talented and inexpensive so the Phils would have to be overwhelmed by an offer to move him. Last year, Klentak moved a young closer in Ken Giles for a significant return from Houston, so he has history in making these types of moves.

• In addition to more potential comings and goings in the bullpen, the Phils will look to add a backup infielder and maybe a backup catcher in the coming weeks. Andres Blanco could return as that extra infielder. A.J. Ellis could return as the catcher. But nothing is firm. In fact, Klentak hinted Monday that he’d be comfortable bringing Andrew Knapp up from Triple A to be the backup catcher next season.

“I don’t think we need a veteran backup catcher,” Klentak said. “If it works out, we’re open-minded to that. But Andrew Knapp just finished his age 25 season in Triple A. He has a full year of at-bats in Triple A. At some point for both he and (Jorge) Alfaro, we’re going to have to find out what those guys can do at the big-league level. During the 2017 season, we’ll have to find out — not just about those two guys — but others.”

• One of the biggest remaining issues facing Phillies management this winter centers around the outfield and the offense. Basically, Klentak and his advisers are weighing the merits of adding another veteran hitter — the club already traded for Howie Kendrick — to improve the offense or giving a significant playing opportunity to a promising youngster and potential future core piece such as Roman Quinn in what currently projects to be one opening in the outfield.

“That topic is the one that we have spent the most time discussing, not just here but this offseason, about striking the right balance between adding a veteran bat or veteran free agent to this team to make our team better, but again, not taking playing time away from players that need the playing time.

“That’s part of the dynamic that we have to consider there. Roman Quinn came up at the end of the year and, at times, looked like a legitimate major-league contributor. But we also have to be mindful of the fact that he hasn’t logged a single at-bat at Triple A yet.

“This doesn’t have an obvious answer. We are continuing to talk about trade acquisitions and talk to agents for free agents to see if the right opportunity exists to blend all those factors together. But what we do not want to do is bring in so many veterans that we are denying opportunities to our young players.”

This brings us to a situation that could potentially satisfy the team’s desire to improve the offense without taking away a playing opportunity from Quinn.

J.D. Martinez of the Detroit Tigers is an outfield bat that the Phillies like. They like his production and the fact that he’s signed for just 2017. In other words, he wouldn’t block a young prospect’s pathway to the majors, at least for long.

Martinez, owed $11.75 million, which is very affordable for the Phillies, is a serious trade candidate for the cost-cutting Tigers and the Phillies have spoken to Tigers officials, dating to the early part of the offseason.

According to sources, the Phillies and Tigers could be a trade fit if the Tigers were to deal second baseman Ian Kinsler. If the Tigers move Kinsler, they could look to move Martinez to the Phillies for second baseman Cesar Hernandez. Phillies officials have said they are in no hurry to deal Hernandez, but the team does have depth at second with a pair of prospects (Scott Kingery and Jesmuel Valentin) on the way and a ready-made stopgap in Kendrick at the position. 

So keep an eye on Kinsler. If he moves, the Phillies could pursue the veteran bat that would make their offense better. And it would not cost Quinn an opportunity as he could play left field with Kendrick moving to second.