Phillies fall to Mets, guarantee losing season

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Phillies fall to Mets, guarantee losing season

BOX SCORE

It was hardly a milestone anyone in the Phillies’ clubhouse was interested in talking about, and who could blame them? After all, the 6-4 loss to the New York Mets on Friday night at Citizens Bank Park sewed up the first losing season for the franchise since 2002 (see Instant Replay).

That 2002 club went 80-81, but they fell out of it early, falling nearly 20 games out of first place by the trade deadline. When September rolled around, the Phillies knew big changes were looming. Jim Thome and Kevin Millwood joined the team in December and a new ballpark was nearly complete.

The 80-81 season was nothing but a minor blip as the Phillies focused on building a perennial contender.

These days, with a losing season wrapped up and nine games left to play, changes appear to be looming again. Only this time there is no Thome or Millwood to add to the roster. Instead, veterans like Ryan Howard, Chase Utley, Jimmy Rollins, Cliff Lee, Cole Hamels and Jonathan Papelbon should be back in 2014. Young players like Cody Asche, Dom Brown and Darin Ruf will be in the mix, too.

Needless to say, there are no plans for a new stadium any time soon.

But in the subdued atmosphere in the Phillies’ clubhouse, no one knows what to expect. They just know things will be different.

“It’s all part of going through this,” interim manager Ryne Sandberg said after the loss. “Sometimes it takes a losing season to build and start the process, and with that a lot of these guys have had a chance to play and gain experience and that’s where you start the rebuilding process. I think there are a lot of good things that have been going on the last few weeks.”

Hamels had been one of the good things for the Phillies over the last few weeks. Though he was dealt a career-worst 14th loss on Friday night, the Phillies had won seven straight games the lefty started going into the game against the Mets and he had a 6-2 record with a 2.32 ERA in his last 14 outings.

In Friday’s game, Hamels found himself trying to recover from a three-run first inning in which Eric Young Jr. wreaked havoc on the base paths with a leadoff double and stolen base and David Wright clubbed a homer in his first plate appearance since Aug. 2.

Hamels battled after the first inning, racking up eight strikeouts without a walk in seven innings. But when the Mets got a runner on base with less than two outs against Hamels, they got the run in.

“It’s kind of a law of averages. There’s going to be days where your stuff’s unbelievable and they’re hitting you all over the ball park," Hamels explained, "and days that your stuff’s very suspect and you walk away with quite a few scoreless innings.

“You just have to give the other team credit for putting the bat on the ball and fighting because it doesn’t make it easy, especially this late in the season, it’s going to be a fight. Ultimately, what you want to see at this type of level is the competitiveness coming out from both sides. Still playing baseball like it means something.”

Hamels hasn’t played meaningless baseball at this point in the season, well … ever. Since becoming a piece in the Phillies’ rotation midway through the 2006 season, the Phillies have always been right in the mix for a playoff berth. However, with a losing season now on the resume, Hamels has to wonder if the Phillies can get back to being contenders again. After all, Hamels was one of those guys whose emergence pushed the Phillies over the top on the way to five straight division titles and two trips to the World Series.

Contenders in 2014?

“I hope so. I know we have a lot to work on and if it doesn’t fire you up and motivate you for the offseason, I don’t know what does,” Hamels said. “That’s what I’ll take into the offseason is trying to win and to do my job even better. Just having the pride knowing the fans and the organization want to see a winning team, and I want to be a part of it.”

In the meantime, the Phillies have to play this one out. They will get back at it against the Mets on Saturday night -- weather permitting -- when Tyler Cloyd (2-5, 5.06) takes on right-hander Dillon Gee (11-10, 3.47).

MLB Notes: Red Sox acquire ace LHP Chris Sale from White Sox

MLB Notes: Red Sox acquire ace LHP Chris Sale from White Sox

OXON HILL, Md. -- All-Star ace Chris Sale is joining the reloading Boston Red Sox, leaving behind his shredded reputation with the Chicago White Sox.

Boston acquired Sale on Tuesday for a package of four prospects, including high-priced Yoan Moncada.

Sale was a top trade target at the winter meetings and the AL East champion Red Sox were getting him instead of Washington, which also pursued.

A few hours earlier, Boston got prime setup man Tyler Thornburg from Milwaukee. After that deal was announced, without tipping his hand, Red Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said: "We're trying to win now, as you can see."

Boston acquired Sale for minor league pitchers Michael Kopech and Victor Diaz, outfielder Luis Basabe and Moncada, a third baseman (see full story).

Red Sox get setup man Thornburg from Brewers for INF Shaw
OXON HILL, Md. -- The Boston Red Sox have gotten the setup man they wanted, acquiring right-hander Tyler Thornburg from the Milwaukee Brewers in a package that included infielder Travis Shaw.

The deal was announced Tuesday and was the first trade at baseball's winter meetings.

Milwaukee also got minor league infielder Mauricio Dubon, minor league right-hander Josh Pennington and a player to be named or $100.

The 28-year-old Thornburg will become Boston's eighth-inning guy, setting up closer Craig Kimbrel for the AL East champions. Thornburg was 8-5 with 13 saves and a 2.15 ERA in 67 games for the Brewers, striking out 90 in 67 innings.

The 26-year-old Shaw hit .242 with 16 home runs and 71 RBIs last season. He mostly played third base, and also saw time at first.

The 22-year-old Dubon hit a combined .323 and scored 101 runs between the Single-A and Double-A levels. The 21-year-old Pennington was 5-3 with a 2.86 ERA in Class A (see full story).

Yankees to retire Jeter's No 2 on May 14, last single digit
NEW YORK -- Derek Jeter's No. 2 is being retired, the last of the New York Yankees' single digits.

The Yankees said Tuesday the number will be retired on May 14 before a Mother's Day game against Houston, and a plaque in his honor will be unveiled in Monument Park during the ceremony.

Jeter's number is the 21st retired by the team. He won five World Series titles and was a 14-time All-Star during a 20-season career that ended in 2014 and he is sixth in career hits with 3,465.

Jeter set Yankees records for hits, games (2,747), at-bats (11,195), doubles (544) and stolen bases (358) (see full story).

Cesar Hernandez remains a person of interest as Phillies look to improve

Cesar Hernandez remains a person of interest as Phillies look to improve

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — The Phillies have completed the signing of veteran reliever Joaquin Benoit to a one-year, $7.5 million contract (see story). The deal could be announced Tuesday and will require the club removing a player from the already-full 40-man roster.

Benoit is one of three additions that the Phils have made to their bullpen this offseason — the club traded for veteran right-hander Pat Neshek and picked up lefty David Rollins on waivers — and more will likely come, probably on minor-league contracts, before the team reports to spring training.

Now that the bullpen has been addressed, let’s take a look at what could be next for the Phillies this winter.

• The addition of Benoit could create enough back-end bullpen depth that GM Matt Klentak could look to trade either Jeanmar Gomez or Hector Neris. Gomez saved 37 games in 2016, but struggled down the stretch. Neris showed great promise in recording a 2.58 ERA and striking out 11.4 batters per nine innings in 79 games in 2016. The hard-throwing righty is young (27), talented and inexpensive so the Phils would have to be overwhelmed by an offer to move him. Last year, Klentak moved a young closer in Ken Giles for a significant return from Houston, so he has history in making these types of moves.

• In addition to more potential comings and goings in the bullpen, the Phils will look to add a backup infielder and maybe a backup catcher in the coming weeks. Andres Blanco could return as that extra infielder. A.J. Ellis could return as the catcher. But nothing is firm. In fact, Klentak hinted Monday that he’d be comfortable bringing Andrew Knapp up from Triple A to be the backup catcher next season.

“I don’t think we need a veteran backup catcher,” Klentak said. “If it works out, we’re open-minded to that. But Andrew Knapp just finished his age 25 season in Triple A. He has a full year of at-bats in Triple A. At some point for both he and (Jorge) Alfaro, we’re going to have to find out what those guys can do at the big-league level. During the 2017 season, we’ll have to find out — not just about those two guys — but others.”

• One of the biggest remaining issues facing Phillies management this winter centers around the outfield and the offense. Basically, Klentak and his advisers are weighing the merits of adding another veteran hitter — the club already traded for Howie Kendrick — to improve the offense or giving a significant playing opportunity to a promising youngster and potential future core piece such as Roman Quinn in what currently projects to be one opening in the outfield.

“That topic is the one that we have spent the most time discussing, not just here but this offseason, about striking the right balance between adding a veteran bat or veteran free agent to this team to make our team better, but again, not taking playing time away from players that need the playing time.

“That’s part of the dynamic that we have to consider there. Roman Quinn came up at the end of the year and, at times, looked like a legitimate major-league contributor. But we also have to be mindful of the fact that he hasn’t logged a single at-bat at Triple A yet.

“This doesn’t have an obvious answer. We are continuing to talk about trade acquisitions and talk to agents for free agents to see if the right opportunity exists to blend all those factors together. But what we do not want to do is bring in so many veterans that we are denying opportunities to our young players.”

This brings us to a situation that could potentially satisfy the team’s desire to improve the offense without taking away a playing opportunity from Quinn.

J.D. Martinez of the Detroit Tigers is an outfield bat that the Phillies like. They like his production and the fact that he’s signed for just 2017. In other words, he wouldn’t block a young prospect’s pathway to the majors, at least for long.

Martinez, owed $11.75 million, which is very affordable for the Phillies, is a serious trade candidate for the cost-cutting Tigers and the Phillies have spoken to Tigers officials, dating to the early part of the offseason.

According to sources, the Phillies and Tigers could be a trade fit if the Tigers were to deal second baseman Ian Kinsler. If the Tigers move Kinsler, they could look to move Martinez to the Phillies for second baseman Cesar Hernandez. Phillies officials have said they are in no hurry to deal Hernandez, but the team does have depth at second with a pair of prospects (Scott Kingery and Jesmuel Valentin) on the way and a ready-made stopgap in Kendrick at the position. 

So keep an eye on Kinsler. If he moves, the Phillies could pursue the veteran bat that would make their offense better. And it would not cost Quinn an opportunity as he could play left field with Kendrick moving to second.