Tainting MLB: Will PED use ever be stopped?

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Tainting MLB: Will PED use ever be stopped?

Since 1965, there has never been a Baseball Hall of Fame ceremony without a living inductee.

Ever since Vietnam and The Beatles were front-page news, there’s always been someone for fans to pat on the back, a highlight reel of plays to relish and a fresh debate over who is and isn't standing on stage at Cooperstown -- every year for nearly 50 years, except this past weekend.

The “Steroid Era” has turned America’s pastime into a sport passed its prime. The true turning point was some years ago when so many players and executives with an inkling of suspicion could have done something, but looked the other way.

And now, we have reached a crescendo.

The likelihood of guys named Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Rafael Palmeiro and Sammy Sosa getting “the call” is about the same as Pedro Cerrano taking a curveball the opposite way -- not likely. With almost 600 votes cast by members of the Baseball Writers Association this year, not one player garnered the requisite 75 percent. Clemens (214 votes, 37.6 percent) and Bonds (206 votes, 36.2 percent) led the group of alleged users.

It's rather funny -- in an I-can’t-believe-you-fell-for-that sort of way -- as I look back on the time when my naivety left me. I can still recall the fondness of the summer of 1998 and how much I enjoyed picking up a newspaper every day to follow the home run chase between Sosa and Mark McGwire.

As much as it pains me to say, from then until now, it seems performance-enhancing drugs have become part of the game. PEDs are about as synonymous with baseball as they are with cycling, which is saying a lot. No player is safe from conjecture and as a spectator it is nearly impossible to suspend disbelief with any player -- experience is a keen teacher.

I want to avoid a proverbial witch hunt as much as the next guy, but please tell me your unbridled thoughts on the Orioles' Chris Davis hitting nearly 40 home runs before the All-Star break. Whether he’s clean or not -- I truly want to believe he is -- I’ve been jilted and jaded by so many Ryan Brauns and Alex Rodriguezs that I’m reaching critical mass.

Are some of the alleged cheaters still HOF worthy? Absolutely. If you’ve ever read the ground-breaking bestseller "Game of Shadows," it documents that Bonds started using PEDs following the 1998 season after watching McGwire break Roger Maris’ home run record. Prior to that, Bonds won three MVP awards, eight Gold Gloves, seven Silver Sluggers and made eight All-Star appearances. Was Clemens using performance enhancers when he fanned 20 batters in a start en route to the 1986 MVP as a 25-year-old? My better judgment says no, but no one knows for sure.

You could argue that the biggest problem is not baseball’s inability to find the perpetrators and what they’re using. I'm starting to seriously believe that PEDs cannot be stopped. Science continues to evolve and the "good guys" are seemingly one step behind. There will always be another BALCOs or Biogenesis as long as there are players who will utilize their seedy services.

The problem is Major League Baseball's drug policy. The risk of being caught is not greater than the reward of a multi-million dollar contract. Lengthen the suspensions and incorporate a hard and fast monetary penalty. Can there be too stiff a penalty? Pete Rose was banned from the game for life for the most egregious of infractions, but which is worse?

It’s at the point where you’re numb to the list of names, places and timelines of who did what and when. We owe it to ourselves, better yet, baseball owes its consumers a continued push to evolve beyond “we’re doing our best” and eradicate the dregs that have left America’s game so sullied.

Twins 4, Phillies 2: Aaron Nola encouraged by good health, still looking for command

Twins 4, Phillies 2: Aaron Nola encouraged by good health, still looking for command

BOX SCORE

CLEARWATER, Fla. -- Aaron Nola has not had a great spring.

But in the big picture, well, maybe he has.

Nola was one of the Phillies' biggest and most important question marks coming into camp. He had missed the final two months of the 2016 season because of an elbow injury. All he needed to do this spring to be in the starting rotation was show that he was healthy.

He's done that.

He pitched 5 2/3 innings against the Minnesota Twins and threw 82 pitches in his fifth start of the spring on Thursday. He gave up six hits, including a two-run homer, walked one and struck out six.

He's up to 17 2/3 innings for the spring -- without an elbow issue.

"I'm over that," Nola said after the game. "My elbow feels really good. I haven't had any pain or problems with it. I don't even think about it throwing or in games.

"Everything has been very positive. My body is healthy."

Nola, who lines up to fill the fifth spot in the Phillies' rotation, hasn't had good results this spring. He has given up 19 hits and 13 earned runs. But, again, the Phillies were only looking for good health.

"He's been working on his changeup," manager Pete Mackanin said. "Today, he threw more changeups than I've ever seen him throw. The changeup he threw for the home run, he admitted, 'I would never throw that pitch in a game.' But he's working on it, trying to get it going for him, and I think it's going to be a good pitch for him. 

"He really pitched better than the result he got. He had a lot of work with his changeup, which is important. He was as sharp as we've seen him."

Coming into camp, Mackanin was concerned about Nola's health.

"I'm less concerned right now," the manager said. "It's always going to be in the back of my mind. But it's good to see 92, 93, 94 (mph) coming out of his hand, which is important. Once he regains that command, and he showed real good command of his fastball down in the zone today, he's going to be back to where he was -- with even maybe a little more velocity. We'll see. But the changeup is going to help him. I'm very encouraged."

The game
The Phillies lost, 4-2, to the Twins.

The Phils had 10 hits, two by Odubel Herrera, who homered.

Andrew Knapp, pushing to make the club, started behind the plate and had a double.

The Phillies were just 1 for 8 with runners in scoring position and left nine men on base.

The Phils' bullpen -- Sean Burnett, Edubray Ramos and Hector Neris -- accounted for 3 1/3 innings of scoreless ball.

Up next
The Phils play the Yankees in Tampa on Friday. Jeremy Hellickson will start against CC Sabathia.

Larry Bowa, Charlie Manuel reflect on special bond with Dallas Green

Larry Bowa, Charlie Manuel reflect on special bond with Dallas Green

CLEARWATER, Fla. -- An impromptu homage to Dallas Green broke out on the field at the Phillies' spring training home Thursday morning.

Larry Bowa, who played for Green on the 1980 World Series championship team, was there.

So was Charlie Manuel, the only other manager other than Green to lead a Phillies team to a World Series title.

They told tales of Green's tough exterior and warm heart.

Bowa even shed a tear.

A couple of hours later, there were a few more tears in the stands as the team honored Green with a moment of silence the day after he died at 82.

Green's old jersey, No. 46, hung in the dugout for the Phillies-Twins game.

"It was tough last night," Bowa said. "I just couldn't believe it. This guy meant the world to us. We don't win a World Series without Dallas. It doesn't matter if we've got 10 Pete Roses, we don't win a World Series without Dallas. 

"He taught me a lot about being mentally tough and giving everything you have, every pitch, nine innings. Never quit. He was a guy that told our team, 'Look in the mirror. You're not as good as you think you are.' He said, 'Anybody can win divisions, go win a World Series. Put a ring on somebody's finger.'"

The Phillies had great talent in the late 1970s but always came one step short of the World Series. Green came in late in the 1979 season and was a stun gun to a complacent team. A year later, they were World Series champions.

"He said, 'I don't care what you did yesterday. What can you do today to help the Phillies win?' He got everybody's attention," Bowa said. "Yeah, we had a lot of give and take, screaming. I think everybody respected him. That's the bottom line. Eventually, when you get done playing, you realize how important he was to the Phillies in 1980."

Bowa was a critic of Green's in the lead up to the World Series. He recalled the give and take with the manager, which wasn't always sugar and spice and everything nice.

After one particularly poor game, Green left his office door open as he spoke with reporters. During the interview session, Green loudly questioned the team's desire and said the group was not as good as it thought it was. The players in the clubhouse heard it all because Green wanted them to -- and, of course, because his voice naturally boomed.

After Green's session with the media that night, a reporter approached Bowa and asked if he'd heard Green's loud commentary.

Of course, Bowa had heard it.

And he was fired up.

"Go ask Dallas how many games he won in the big leagues," Bowa told the writer, poking at Green's modest 20-22 record as a big-league pitcher.

When the writer informed Green of Bowa's barb, Green responded with a loud, "Touche, Bo. Touche."

"He wanted you to hear things," Bowa said.

That was one of his ways of challenging people. And he really liked to challenge players. It was his way of inspiring and separating the weak from the strong.

Manuel compared that to one of his former managers, Billy Martin.

"He was like a Billy Martin kind of guy," Manuel said. "He'll tell you what he expects out of you, but at the same time, he'll tell you that you can't do something. That's a big challenge to you. When you show him that you can do it, that's when he's on your side and he thinks the world of you. That's the time you become his guy."

Manuel became Green's guy after the two had a public spat in 2006. In a radio interview, Green, then a member of the team's front office, had criticized the way Manuel's Phillies were playing. In particular, he said the team lacked fundamentals. Manuel was furious that a member of the front office would criticize him publicly. A month or so later, as the Phillies rallied themselves into wild-card contention, Manuel and Green came face to face on the field before a game at Citizens Bank Park.

Manuel unloaded on Green.

And Green took his medicine.

From that confrontation, respect and understanding grew. Manuel and Green became great friends and frequent dinner partners. A few years later, Green admitted to a reporter that he was wrong for scuffing Manuel and he thanked Manuel for showing him that there are other ways to run a team than just the way he did it.

"I showed him," Manuel said. "When I look back, maybe he was testing me. But I understood him and I think at the end he felt he understood me."

On the night the Phillies won the World Series in 2008, Manuel and Green, members of an elite, two-man club, sat in Manuel's office and reflected.

"He was very happy," Manuel said. "Him and I had a few drinks of VO. I think I outdrank him, really. But, of course, when he won back in 1980 he would have outdrank me.

"Everything about it was good. He was just as happy as I was and I can't tell you how happy I was.

"He was always around and he definitely pulled for the Phillies day in and day out.

"Baseball's going to miss Dallas Green.

"I'm going to miss him."