Breaking down the Sixers' wild deadline day

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Breaking down the Sixers' wild deadline day

Grab a pen and a notepad. We’ll go through what the Sixers did at the trade deadline in an attempt to connect the dots. There are many, many dots.

Remember when we all thought draft night was an indecipherable blur? That evening was fully focused by comparison. Sam Hinkie made moves on Thursday. The Sixers' president and general manager does not mess around.

Trade 1
The Sixers began by sending Spencer Hawes to Cleveland in exchange for forward Earl Clark, center Henry Sims and two second-round picks in the 2014 draft (one from Cleveland, the other from Memphis that the Cavaliers acquired in a previous deal).

Hawes will be an unrestricted free agent at the end of the year. Clark, according to a source, has already been waived. He had a team option for next year. Sims is on a non-guaranteed deal and likely won't return either. So basically, the Sixers were left with two extra second-round picks. They started the day with three second-round picks, bringing their total for the 2014 draft to five second-round picks. That’s a lot, but the Sixers weren’t done.

Also, the Sixers saved a little money in the Cavs deal and dropped to about $13.4 million below the salary cap, which became significant in their next move.

Trade 2
The Sixers were involved in a three-way trade with the Nuggets and the Wizards. The Nuggets sent Andre Miller to Washington in exchange for Jan Vesely. Meanwhile, the Sixers landed point guard Eric Maynor from the Wizards, along with a 2015 second-round pick from the Pelicans (via the Wizards) and the Nuggets' 2016 second-round pick.

You may wonder what the Sixers gave up in the deal. The answer: A little bit of cap space. The money they already had available, combined with the extra money they cleared in Trade 1 with Cleveland, allowed the Sixers to essentially serve as middlemen and help facilitate the deal between the Wizards and Nuggets.

The reason they did so: The 2015 and 2016 picks are particularly valuable to the Sixers because they could very likely help pay off the debt they owe for acquiring Arnett Moultrie. For more on how that would work, read this. The Sixers acquired a second 2015 second-round pick from the Pacers in Trade 4 (see below).

As for Maynor, he has a player option for next year at $2.1 million. He’s going to pick it up because, hey, money. No biggie. It’s a tiny contract and the Sixers already have a lot of money available next year as you’ll see as we continue the exercise.

Trade 3
The Sixers sent a conditional second-round pick –- meaning they’ll place stipulations on it that will likely make it a late-draft selection –- to the Clippers in exchange for center Byron Mullens and a second-round draft pick in 2018.

Mullens has a player option for next season at $1.06 million. As with Maynor, this is no big deal. The Sixers could always trade Maynor and/or Mullens. (Hinkie likes to trade people.) If not, ah well. They have to pay someone to play basketball, and these guys are cheap.

Trade 4
This was the one everyone waited for (even though the trade partner hadn’t been pre-reported by anyone and came as a surprise): The Sixers sent Evan Turner and Lavoy Allen to the Indiana Pacers for Danny Granger and Golden State's second-round pick in 2015. That trade was first reported by Yahoo! Sports and Grantland and then confirmed by CSNPhilly.com.

Had the Sixers kept Turner, a former second overall pick, they would have had to extend an $8.7 million qualifying offer in the offseason if they wanted to make him a restricted free agent. They clearly did not want to make him a restricted free agent. Turner obviously didn’t figure into the Sixers' future in any form. If the Sixers hadn’t moved him, Turner would have walked after becoming an unrestricted free agent.

Allen and Granger will also be unrestricted free agents after this year. Either way, the Sixers were going to clear that money for next season. That is, they weren’t going to pay Turner and Allen, and now they won’t pay Granger. So why do it?

Forget about Allen and Granger. Basically, the Sixers flipped Turner for yet another second-round pick. Given where that pick is likely to fall (at the very end of the second round since the Pacers are a top-tier team), that’s basically the absolute minimum the Sixers could have fetched for Turner. Part of that reduced price is because teams probably figured they could make a run at Turner in the offseason and give up only money to land him instead of also surrendering a pick. But part of that is also because the market didn’t value Turner very highly. The idea that Turner could have been flipped for a first-round pick was always a fallacy.

The bottom line
So where does all this maneuvering leave the Sixers?

Three players went out (Hawes, Turner and Allen) and five four came in (Clark, Sims, Maynor, Mullens and Granger). The Sixers also acquired two second-round picks for 2014, two second-round picks for 2015, one second-round pick for 2016, and one second-round pick for 2018. And they figure to have a ton of cap space moving forward, as expected.

About the picks: If that seems like a lot of second-rounders, it is. But the Sixers almost certainly won't use them all. As mentioned above, one of the 2015 and 2016 second-rounders will likely pay off the Moultrie debt. The others can be alternately employed to select players or included in future deals. As everyone learned today, second-round picks are a type of NBA currency that sometimes help trades get done. The Sixers have accrued quite a bit of that currency.

As for the cap space: If Jason Richardson (who has a player option for $6.6 million next season), Maynor and Mullens all opt in next year –- and they almost certainly will, because who passes up on money? -– the Sixers will still be in great shape. Including those three, they’d have about $27 million in salary commitments. That’s not counting cap holds and what they’ll have to pay future picks and such. Ballparking it here, the Sixers should be around $30 million under the cap as they start to move more pieces around the board this offseason. That’s a lot.

The NBA is about flexibility. The Sixers had options before Thursday’s trade deadline. Now they have even more.

NBA Playoffs: Raptors advance past Bucks despite blowing 25-point lead

NBA Playoffs: Raptors advance past Bucks despite blowing 25-point lead

MILWAUKEE -- DeMar DeRozan scored 32 points and the Toronto Raptors squandered a 25-point lead late in the third quarter before holding on for a 92-89 victory Thursday night over the Milwaukee Bucks to take their first-round playoff series in six games.

Cory Joseph had five points in a 9-0 run in the final 2 minutes, including a 3-pointer with 1:27 left, to help stave off the pesky Bucks.

The Raptors move on to face the Cleveland Cavaliers in the Eastern Conference semifinals in a series that starts Monday. They'll need to work on finishing off opponents in the second half.

Jason Terry's 3 with 3:06 left gave the Bucks an 80-78 lead, completing an unlikely comeback from the 25-point deficit with 5:16 left in the third quarter. The Raptors looked as if they were on cruise control after DeMarre Carroll's 3 gave them the 71-46 advantage.

Giannis Antetokounmpo spearheaded the second-half rally for Milwaukee. He had 34 points.

But the Bucks finished one comeback short.

The furious effort appeared to sap the energy of the young Bucks. Even Antetokounmpo, a renowned gym rat, looked tired with his hands on hips as he caught his breath during fourth-quarter breaks. He played 47 minutes.

Antetokounmpo finished 13 of 23 from the field but was 2 of 6 in the fourth.

The Raptors could finally breathe easy after DeRozan went 2 of 2 from the foul line with 3.1 seconds to play for a three-point lead. Tony Snell's inbounds pass on the ensuing possession was intercepted by DeRozan (see full recap).

Spurs advance: San Antonio beats Grizzlies 103-96 in Game 6
NASHVILLE, Tennessee -- Kawhi Leonard scored 29 points, helping the San Antonio Spurs advance to the Western Conference semifinals by beating the Memphis Grizzlies 103-96 Thursday night to take the series 4-2.

The Spurs now have beaten Memphis four of the five playoff series between these teams, and this was San Antonio's second straight win over the Grizzlies in the first round.

Tony Parker added 27 points on 11-of-14 shooting, while LaMarcus Aldridge had 17 points and 12 rebounds. Patty Mills had 10 points off the bench for the Spurs. San Antonio outrebounded Memphis 46-28, with 16 of those offensive boards. That led to 17 second-chance points.

Their semifinal with Houston will start Monday night in San Antonio.

Mike Conley scored 26 points, leading the five Memphis starters in double digits. Marc Gasol added 18, Zach Randolph 13 points and 11 rebounds, and Vince Carter had 12 points (see full recap).

Sixers 2016-17 player evaluation: Ben Simmons

Sixers 2016-17 player evaluation: Ben Simmons

Ben Simmons

Position: Point guard? Power forward? TBD

Status for 2017-18: Guaranteed — $6,168,840

Simmons in 2016-17
Ben Simmons missed the entire 2016-17 season after suffering a Jones fracture in his right foot on the final day of training camp.

He was ruled out officially in late February when a scan revealed his foot had not fully healed. Simmons was cleared to advance his training in mid-April.

This season was one of learning for Simmons. The Sixers implemented a multifaceted rehab program to improve his health, education and shot. This included studying game film with Brett Brown and working closely with shooting coach John Townsend.

Simmons also joined the Sixers to experience life on the road. During these trips, he spent time with point guard Jerryd Bayless, who is serving as a veteran go-to as Simmons learns the NBA backcourt.

Signature game
Since Simmons did not appear in a game, let's modify here. Simmons was no stranger to showing off his skills during pregame warmups, including this dunk in Indiana.

Looking ahead to 2017-18
Simmons' first step to prepare for next season is five-on-five work. The Sixers have to determine if that will include his participating in the summer league. This seems unlikely given Simmons' lack of full-contact basketball activity with his own team and the fact he was limited last summer when healthy.

The second step is learning the point guard position. The Sixers plan to start Simmons at the one next season, a role in which they believe Simmons can thrive because of his athleticism and court vision.

The Sixers will work with Simmons to continue improving his shot, specifically hitting free throws and finishing at the basket with both hands.

On Simmons
"I think that the question about whether or not Ben Simmons is a point guard or not, that will play itself out over time. But I don't think there's going to be a quick answer there. I know there's a commitment by the staff to make that happen."

Sixers president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo

"What I left Stockton (training camp) being so excited about was that he is an elite, potentially, defensive player. So was his father that I coached for five years. It's in his bloodline." 

Sixers head coach Brett Brown