Philadelphia 76ers

Brown knows Sixers must be smart with Noel

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Brown knows Sixers must be smart with Noel

After talking with reporters for a few minutes at practice Tuesday, Sixers head coach Brett Brown, much to his surprise, hadn't been asked about Nerlens Noel.

So Brown brought up the topic himself.

“Anyone want to talk about Nerlens?” Brown said with a smile.

Less than 24 hours earlier, before the Sixers' preseason loss to Cleveland in Columbus, Ohio, Brown had revealed that he didn't expect Noel to play this season. Noel, the Sixers' prized draft-night acquisition, is recovering from a torn ACL suffered in February.

“I want to talk about Nerlens," Brown said. "Of course we want him back, but that decision is going to be made by a lot of smarter people then me. Doctors, trainers and the obvious people, and so who knows what is going to happen with Nerlens? I've gone to media training this morning before I came here, and we hope he can come back. So since you didn’t ask about Nerlens, I thought I would just bring it up."

It's a worthy topic given what Noel represents for fans this franchise: hope.

"We get it. I get it. The coaching staff, teammates -- we want to see him back," Brown said. "How can you not want to see that man back? With his bounce and size and athleticism? ... We want to see him. I get the disappointment, and so the club will make a responsible decision based on his future."

We can only hope the long season doesn’t steal Brown’s humor and his willingness to be forthcoming. The Sixers are building a reputation, and it is that they are in for a long year. Throughout this preseason various scouts and player personnel people around the league have stopped to share that sentiment.

It will be a different year for sure. Wins will be scarce. When the Sixers first decided to start from scratch by trading Jrue Holiday on draft night, fans applauded the boldness of president/general manger Sam Hinkie.

But seeing the product during the preseason -- they're 2-4 -- and learning that Noel may indeed be sidelined for the entire year has those same fans disgruntled before opening night has even arrived.

It wasn't the first time Brown said he wasn’t expecting Nerlens to participate. During Saturday's practice at the Palestra, he said as much -- but included two other teammates in his statement.

“You can carry a roster of 15. So right off the bat you start the season with four of them out,” Brown said. “Nerlens, Kwame (Brown), Arnett (Moultrie) and Jason Richardson. And there is no daylight except Kwame at some point. The other ones are done.”

The other ones are done.

Brown doesn't expect Noel, Moultrie (ankle) or Richardson (knee) to play this year.

I understand that Moultrie and Richardson being sidelined for the season resonates little with fans. I also understand the instinct to think Noel is another Andrew Bynum situation -- the acquisition of damaged goods.

Unfortunately, jumping to that conclusion is not accurate. Their injuries are different; their bodies are different; their ages are different.

And while we are on the subject of Bynum, nothing was more frustrating than the false hope that was continually put out there last season that Bynum was progressing and would soon take the court.

Maybe Bynum really did experience multiple setbacks, but it came across as a façade.

This year’s team will struggle, and even Noel can’t change that. Not as a rookie who, if they did bring him back, hasn’t played basketball in a year.

The good news is plenty of NBA players have recovered from torn ACLs: Al Jefferson, David West, Baron Davis, Jamal Crawford -- and hopefully we are seeing the same for Derrick Rose.

Noel’s time will come to join that list, but like those who recovered before him, the timetable is lengthy and has its stages.

Be patient.

Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons among Sixers at Eagles' home opener

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Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons among Sixers at Eagles' home opener

Philly teams supporting Philly teams.

Sixers head coach Brett Brown, Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons, Robert Covington, Richaun Holmes and Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot attended the Eagles’ home opener together Sunday.

While the Sixers watched the Eagles' game against the Giants from a suite, Embiid still high-fived with fans during the afternoon.

The Sixers and Eagles have close ties. Justin Anderson has longstanding friendships with Torrey Smith, Rodney McLeod and Chris Long (see story)

Sunday is the final day of the Sixers' offseason. Media day will be held Monday and training camp begins Tuesday at their training complex in Camden, New Jersey. 

Donald Trump starts war with sports, and athletes have united

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Donald Trump starts war with sports, and athletes have united

OAKLAND -- As President Donald Trump lurches closer to certified insanity, he is unwittingly doing the country a great service that, should we survive his dangerously whimsical term, will bring us closer to realizing our potential.

He’s unifying the previously disconnected and energizing the formerly apathetic. He’s even shaming some of those previously beyond shame.

It is because of Trump’s rage, unleashed in a span of less than 24 hours, that the NBA champion Warriors were more united Saturday morning than they were Friday afternoon.

After a speech in Alabama urging NFL owners on Friday to fire any “son of a bitch” who dared to protest peacefully to shine a light on injustices, Trump woke up Saturday and turned his Twitter ire upon Stephen Curry and the Warriors, conceivably the most wholesome representatives of American sports.

“That’s not what leaders do,” Curry said after practice Saturday.

“We know we’re in a fight,” Warriors center David West said. “And we’re going to continue to fight for our right to be human beings.”

But by advocating the job loss of peaceful protesters and then informing the Warriors they are not welcome at the White House -- because Curry said he’s not in favor of going -- we can only hope Trump has flung open a door of activism that never closes.

Trump’s radical combo ignited mighty blasts of blowback from players and coaches and commissioners of the NBA and NFL.

Among the many NBA figures issuing statements in one form or another, with varying degrees of condemnation: LeBron James, Chris Paul, Kobe Bryant, Magic Johnson, the players association and commissioner Adam Silver.

“The amount of support I saw around the league this morning was amazing,” Curry said.

Among the many NFL figures who were moved to comment: Seahawks players Richard Sherman and Michael Bennett, Broncos lineman Max Garcia, 49ers owner Jed York, New York Giants owners John Mara and Steve Tisch, Packers boss Mark Murphy, the players association and commissioner Roger Goodell.

Trump has, in short, started a war with American sports.

His strike began with the comments made Friday night that were directed at Colin Kaepernick and others who have declined to stand for the anthem. Trump’s aggression intensified Saturday when he went after Curry in the morning and Goodell in the afternoon.

How did we get here?

The Warriors on Friday announced their plan to meet as a team Saturday morning to decide whether they would accept from the White House the traditional invitation extended to championship teams. Though it was fairly certain they would not, they left open the slightest possibility. General manager Bob Myers had been in contact with White House.

Curry at the time said he, personally, did not wish to go, and then he carefully and patiently expounded on his reasons.

Trump responded, at 5:45 a.m. Saturday, to tell the world that the Warriors would not be invited and, moreover, that Curry’s resistance is the reason.

And all hell broke loose.

The Warriors came back Saturday afternoon with a statement that made clear there no longer would be a team meeting on the subject, that they were disappointed there was no open dialogue and that they will instead utilize their February visit to “celebrate equality, diversity and inclusion -- the values we embrace as an organization.”

“Not surprised,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said of Trump’s decision not to invite the Warriors to the White House. “He was going to break up with us before we could break up with him.”

Trump has fired upon every athlete in America. He is waking up this country in ways we’ve never seen or felt and, my goodness, he’s doing so at a level we’ve needed for centuries.

“Trump has become the greatest mirror for America,” West said. “My cousin . . . she brought that to me. Because there are a lot of things have been in the dark, hidden, and he’s just bold enough to put it out on ‘Front Street.’"