Dedmon brings defense, energy to Sixers

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Dedmon brings defense, energy to Sixers

Dewayne Dedmon appeared to be getting a crash course at the conclusion of the Sixers' practice on Tuesday. Dedmon had gone through his first practice with the second NBA team to call him up this season from the Development League.

Dedmon appeared in four games for the Warriors this season. 

“It is a grind,” Dedmon said of playing in the NBDL and waiting for an opportunity to play in the NBA. “Everyday you don't know when it is going to happen, so you have to mind your P's and Q's, especially in the D-League. You have to stay on top of your game.”

Dedmon put up impressive numbers while playing for the Santa Cruz Warriors in the D-League. In 15 games, the center averaged 15 points, 13.5 rebounds and 2.3 blocked shots per game. He also shot 54 percent from the field.

“The thing that we like most about him is that he is polishable,” Sixers head coach Brett Brown said. “His youth and his athleticism make it interesting. He runs. You can put him behind the scenes and he can put out fires and block some shots and we have some rim protection when we put him in. He is wide-eyed and grateful for the opportunity.”

Dedmon agrees that defense is his forte.

“I am a high-energy player,” Dedmon said. “On the defensive end I do what I do, rebound and block shots.”

Dedmon only started playing basketball his senior year of high school. In two seasons at USC, Dedmon posted modest numbers. Last year for the Trojans he averaged 6.7 points, 7.0 rebounds and 2.1 blocks per game before entering the NBA draft. He went undrafted.

Dedmon fills a roster spot that opened up when the Sixers waived Daniel Orton last week. Orton had appeared in 22 games for the Sixers averaging 3.0 points and 2.8 rebounds in 11.4 minutes a game.

“Daniel is fairly athletic for a man of his size,” Brown said. “But when you look at the body composition, Dewayne is probably more lean, more up and down. He has no problem running rim to rim.”

The Sixers have a rim-to-rim player in Nerlens Noel, but he is still on the road to recovery (see story). That type of big man seems tailor made for the Sixers' style of play, as they continue to have the fastest pace in the league.

Brown said he just might play the seven-foot Dedmon in Wednesday's game against the Bobcats.

Frontcourt players Lavoy Allen and Arnett Moultrie participated in Tuesday’s practice, but their availability for Wednesday is an unknown.

“Dewayne had a full practice. Arnett was in it [and] Lavoy was in it. You actually felt like you had a big team,” Brown joked. “I had no idea who I was coaching today.”

Allen missed the last two games with a calf injury. Moultrie has been sidelined all season after undergoing ankle surgery just before the start of training camp.

Joel Embiid practices fully but doubtful for Friday and Saturday

Joel Embiid practices fully but doubtful for Friday and Saturday

Joel Embiid was a full participant Wednesday during the Sixers' first practice back from the All-Star break, but he's listed as doubtful for their games Friday and Saturday.

The Sixers host the Wizards Friday night (7/CSN) and face the Knicks Saturday night at Madison Square Garden (7:30/CSN).

If Embiid misses both games it would be 13 in a row and 16 of 17.

Still, it's a good sign he was able to practice in full Wednesday.

Ben Simmons, meanwhile, has a CT scan scheduled for Thursday in New York. The appointment should show whether his foot has healed enough for him to take the next step in his rehab.

Simmons did individual work at Wednesday's practice.

CSN Philly's Jessica Camerato contributed to this report.

NBA trade deadline: Buyer's market? Lakers got next to nothing in Lou Williams trade

NBA trade deadline: Buyer's market? Lakers got next to nothing in Lou Williams trade

If the two NBA trades this week indicate anything, it's that we're in a buyer's market.

Two days after DeMarcus Cousins was traded by the Kings to the Pelicans for a shockingly light return, Magic Johnson made his first move as the Lakers' new head honcho, shipping Lou Williams to Houston.

In exchange for Lou-Will, the Lakers got Corey Brewer and the Rockets' first-round pick, another surprisingly modest return.

Williams, 30, is having the best season of his 11-year career and it's not just because he was playing big fish on a bad team. You'd think the Lakers' lack of talent would result in somewhat inefficient scoring from Lou-Will, but that's not the case.

He's averaging a career-high 18.6 points, shooting a career-best 38.5 percent from three and 88.4 percent from the line. Only once, 2009-10 with the Sixers, did Williams shoot better than his current 44.4 percent from the field.

Because Williams signed his three-year deal with the Lakers before the salary cap spiked last offseason, he's underpaid in the current NBA landscape. He's owed just $7 million next season, a team-friendly salary for a player who can provide instant offense off the bench.

Brewer is a non-factor in the trade and won't have much of a future role with the rebuilding Lakers, so the trade was basically Williams for a very late first-round pick. The Rockets are 40-18 and would pick 27th if the season ended today.

Picks that late in the first round just aren't that valuable. Over the last five drafts, only eight of the 30 players selected in the 25 to 30 range have even cracked an NBA rotation. And two of them are Spurs, which is almost like its own separate category given how regularly San Antonio unearths talent in the draft.

Even those who've cracked rotations after being drafted 25-30 over the last five years are not impact players: Pascal Siakam, Larry Nance Jr., Andre Roberson, Miles Plumlee. Keep in mind that's a good scenario for that late of a first-rounder. The only two actual difference-makers drafted in that range the last five years are Rudy Gobert and Clint Capela.

Keep this return in mind when wondering what the Sixers might be able to recoup in a deadline trade of players like Ersan Ilyasova or Nik Stauskas. 

It's a worse return for the Lakers than the Kings received on draft night last summer for Marco Belinelli. Sacramento traded Belinelli, a journeyman bench player, for the No. 22 overall pick.

Could the Lakers have possibly gotten less than the 27th pick if they just held onto Williams and traded him in the offseason?

When I opined last night on Twitter that the Lakers didn't do well in the Lou-Will deal, a few people replied that the Lakers aren't trying to win, they're trying to finish with a bottom-three record and keep their pick rather than ship it to the Sixers.

But keep in mind that finishing with even the second-worst record in the NBA guarantees the Lakers nothing. The team that finishes with the second-worst record has a 55.8 percent chance of landing a top-three pick. The team that finishes with the third-worst record has a 46.9 percent of chance of landing a top-three pick.

Far from a sure thing.

One sure thing is the Lakers won't be catching the Nets for the league's worst record. Even if the Lakers go 0-24 the rest of the way to finish 19-63, they'd still need the Nets to go 11-15 or better. Brookyln's lost 14 games in a row, so that ain't happening.