Evan Turner on dunk vs. Lakers: 'I was trippin''

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Evan Turner on dunk vs. Lakers: 'I was trippin''

LOS ANGELES -- Evan Turner, by nature, is an emotional guy. He’s also fiercely competitive.

At the end of Sunday’s game, those two characteristics combined to be the force behind Turner committing a no-no on the court.

Turner scored the Sixers’ final field goal, capping off a 111-104 win over the Lakers and ending their near two-month drought of winning on the road (13 games).

His bucket was a reverse slam in front of the Lakers’ bench with 0.4 seconds left on the clock.

The outcome of the game was clearly in hand, so common courtesy is for Turner to dribble the ball out and settle for the five-point win.

“I really thought there was 10 or 15 seconds left, so I didn’t think much of it until I came down,” Turner said. “Then I saw that it was 0.4 seconds and then I realized I was trippin'.”

In actuality, Turner had a moment where he didn’t think, leaving the Lakers’ bench overreacting over something small. That was, at least, their initial reaction.

"I apologized, and said I made a mistake,” Turner said. “We are grown men. I shook hands. Nobody had anything to say, so I am not going to worry too much about it.”

Turner scored 22 points with seven rebounds and six assists against Los Angeles. It was the third game Turner’s played with Michael Carter-Williams since MCW returned from his right knee skin infection.

There is an obvious difference in Turner’s play when Carter-Williams is in the lineup.

“Mike does a pretty good job of finding me when I am open,” Turner said. “[With] Mike, you have to pay attention … I get a little more open as opposed to seeing two or three people.

“It is always great putting the band back together.”

When the band is together, good rhythm is the result, and the numbers support that.

Turner, by his own admission, should not have played in the Bucks game because of his sore right knee. He made only two shots in 15 attempts, but in the other two games, with Carter-Williams back, he was 22 for 41 from the floor.

Turner shot 38.1 percent from the floor during Carter-Williams’ seven-game absence.

Report: Former Villanova star Ryan Arcidiacono signs 2-way deal with Bulls

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Report: Former Villanova star Ryan Arcidiacono signs 2-way deal with Bulls

Ryan Arcidiacono is getting another shot to stick in the NBA.

According to a report on Monday by Sean Highkin‏ of TheAthletic.com, Arcidiacono has signed a two-way contract with the Chicago Bulls. Highkin reports that the deal is for one season.

Arcidiacono, the former Villanova star and champion, played for the Bulls during the Las Vegas Summer League. The point guard averaged 5.8 points on 41.7 percent shooting from the field and 44.4 percent shooting from three-point range. Arcidiacono also recorded 3.2 rebounds and 2.8 assists in five games (three starts) for the Bulls in Vegas. 

Earlier this month, Arcidiacono signed with Juve Caserta in Italy's Lega Basket Serie A. However, Highkin writes that the club was “recently excluded from the Italian league Serie A due to financial concerns.”

After going undrafted in 2016, Arcidiacono joined the Spurs for summer league and preseason action. He was waived during the preseason but was able to latch on with the Austin Spurs, San Antonio’s G-League affiliate.

In 47 games (34 starts) for the Austin Spurs in 2016-17, Arcidiacono averaged 6.5 points, 3.8 assists and 3.7 rebounds in 27.5 minutes a night. He shot 47.2 percent from the field, 42.1 percent from three-point range and 81.4 percent from the free throw line.

Now with Big3, Rashard Lewis praises Sixers' signing of former teammate JJ Redick

Now with Big3, Rashard Lewis praises Sixers' signing of former teammate JJ Redick

How time flies.

JJ Redick first played with Rashard Lewis on the Magic in 2007, Redick’s second season in the NBA. Ten years later, the 33-year-old Redick has signed a massive one-year, $23 million contract to be one of the Sixers’ leaders. Lewis, 37, is currently competing in the BIG3 league. 

Both Redick and Lewis are in different places in their careers than when they were teammates. Lewis sees Redick excelling in this new chapter. 

“He’s the veteran player here, but when I played with him in Orlando he was a young fella,” Lewis said. “He’s learned a lot playing with Orlando as well as the Clippers. I’m sure he’ll share a lot of his knowledge with these guys because they’ve got a very young team.”

Redick’s NBA insight came from doing a lot of observing early on. He didn’t start off as the main offensive option. Instead, he was a student of the game in his early days with the Magic while Lewis was one of the go-to players. 

Redick averaged just 6.0 points as a rookie and 4.1 points in 8.1 minutes per game during his second season. He clocked a total of 10 minutes during a 2008 postseason in which the Magic reached the Eastern Conference semifinals. The following season in 2009, though, Redick averaged over 20 minutes during their NBA Finals run. The Magic also made it to the Eastern Conference finals the next year.

“The chemistry we had was great,” Lewis said. “I think he’s going to bring that here to Philly.”

Over time, Redick developed into one of the best long-range threats in the league. He holds a 41.5 percent career three-point shooting percentage, sixth among all active players. The Sixers have been in need of go-to scorers, especially from beyond the arc. 

“He’s going to help this team,” Lewis said. “He’s going to open it up because he’s a shooter.”

The Sixers are entering an important phase this coming season. They finally have a foundation in place and a core to build upon for years down the road, not just the time being. The younger players will benefit from listening to Redick during practices, games, team flights, and all the other scenarios in which they can soak up his experiences. That could include the playoffs, too, in the suddenly wide-open Eastern Conference. 

“The way he played the game, he’s not only a good shooter but he’s a smart player,” Lewis said. “He has a high basketball IQ. That’s why he’s still playing in the league. A lot of teams have a lot of respect for him.”