Hinkie: Sixers' challenges 'not for the faint of heart'

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Hinkie: Sixers' challenges 'not for the faint of heart'

When the press conference began, only two men sat down in front of the Sixers' backdrop to face the media. They hadn’t said anything yet, which was fine, because the scene said plenty.

Two men. Not a parade of countless owners crowding onto the platform to soak in the spotlight. Not the team’s ever-growing roster of consultants. Two men. That was it. Majority owner Joshua Harris was seated next to his newest hire -- Sam Hinkie, the man who was officially announced as the organization’s president and general manager on Tuesday at PCOM.

Harris reportedly took the lead in finding someone to replace former president Rod Thorn (now a consultant for the team) and former general manager Tony DiLeo (now a nice but unemployed man). Hinkie was his hire. That’s the main power structure these days. Harris and Hinkie and whomever they bring in to coach the team.

That’s the next undertaking for the franchise -- finding a head coach. It is a big task, but it is one of many. Because while the Sixers now have someone to lead the front office -- someone respected for his deep knowledge of advanced analytics and salary cap nuance -- the organization still has many chores ahead.

“The challenge in front of us is not for the faint of heart,” Hinkie admitted. “It humbles me, in fact. But it also invigorates me to get to work.”

“Humbles” was an interesting word. “Frightens” might have been a better choice, but it was his first day on the job. Perhaps the terror will set in a little later.

If the Sixers are a home improvement project, Hinkie and his basketball construction staff can either tear the entire structure down to the foundation and rebuild, or they can keep what they like and renovate everything else. There is no right or guaranteed approach.

As Hinkie said, it’s a “hard league” and there aren’t any “silver bullets where you do one thing and it makes it really easy overnight.” By most accounts, he is a smart man, but he isn’t a wizard who can say a spell and undo the copious mistakes that were made before he was pried away from the Houston Rockets.

So, about those challenges. Care to outline them?

“The situation that the franchise is in right now after a well-documented big trade that didn’t end in a way that people are comfortable with,” Hinkie said. “And so now you really have to face yourself in the mirror everyday and look at the reality of what’s here and the reality of what can be.”

Again, it was his first day. He’s probably still looking for the coffee machine and someone to go to lunch with, so we’ll help him out. What’s here: Not much. What can be: That’s a much tougher topic.

The Sixers need a head coach. They have limited assets in terms of players who can be valuable to them on the court or in trades. The draft is approaching (Hinkie leaves for the pre-draft camp in Chicago on Wednesday). And they’ll have to get creative with the salary cap if they want to free up money for free agency this offseason or next.

All of that falls under Hinkie’s purview. So does the Andrew Bynum decision, which might be the toughest of all. Again, tear down the whole thing and start over or try to renovate and hope for the best? Maybe you think the Sixers’ decision should be obvious one way or the other, but if Hinkie sees things that way he wasn’t letting on. Not on Tuesday.

Hinkie was asked about Bynum and whether the trade is officially over as far as the organization is concerned. The question had an obvious undertone: Is the franchise finished with Bynum? Hinkie paused for a while before answering. For five long seconds, actually.

“I don’t think there’s anything else to be said about the trade except the way people think about it in hindsight,” Hinkie said. “If your question is about Andrew in particular, which I suspect it is, which is fine, I suspect this makes me boring, I think of Andrew like the thousands of other young men walking around the world that are unrestricted free agents that have the potential to play NBA basketball. And he is one of those. And I am duty-bound to consider them, to look at them, all of them.”

You can read and re-read that quote and here’s what you’ll come away with: Not much. There are a lot of words in that response but not much information. If Hinkie knows what he wants to do about Bynum -- or a head coach or Evan Turner or Thaddeus Young or Jrue Holiday or in free agency or the upcoming draft -- he’s keeping it to himself, at least for now.

“I started my career out of college in the business world in using data to help people make complicated decisions,” Hinkie said. “It turns out it helps. It helps a lot.”

He’d better hope so.

NBA Playoffs: Avery Bradley's buzzer-beating 3 lifts Celtics past Cavaliers in Game 3

NBA Playoffs: Avery Bradley's buzzer-beating 3 lifts Celtics past Cavaliers in Game 3

BOX SCORE

CLEVELAND -- Leprechauns are imaginary. Celtic pride is very real.

Avery Bradley's 3-pointer danced on the rim and dropped with less than a second left and Boston, blown out in the first two games of the Eastern Conference finals and playing without star Isaiah Thomas, stunned the Cleveland Cavaliers 111-108 on Sunday night in Game 3 to end the champions' 13-game postseason winning streak.

Bradley's shot from the left wing -- off a play designed by coach Brad Stevens -- bounced on the rim four times before going down. It capped a furious, focused comeback by the Celtics, who trailed by 21 in the third quarter before rallying to tighten up a series that appeared to be over.

"Wide-open look," Bradley said. "Al (Horford) did a great job of getting me open and Marcus (Smart) made a great pass and I was able to knock down the shot."

Smart, who started in place of Thomas, made seven 3-pointers and scored 27 points, and Bradley had 20 for the Celtics, who were given little chance after losing by 44 in Game 2 and then losing Thomas for the rest of the postseason because of a hip injury.

"Everybody had to step up their game tonight especially with one of our brothers down," Smart said. "Our love and support goes out to Isaiah. We wish he could be here but we understand. We just kept fighting. Everybody did their part."

Kyrie Irving scored 29 points, and Kevin Love had 28 for Cleveland. The Cavaliers dropped to 10-1 in the postseason with their first loss since Game 4 of last year's Finals.

Game 4 is Tuesday night in Cleveland.

LeBron James had one of the worst games of his postseason career, finishing with 11 points and six turnovers.

"I didn't have it," said James. "You let a team like that grab momentum you almost knew a shot like that was going in."

Still, the Cavs were in control leading 77-56 in the third quarter after making 14 3-pointers in the first half. But Cleveland got complacent, Smart got hot and the Celtics, who arrived at Quicken Loans Arena on Sunday morning for their shootaround without Thomas and looking somewhat defeated, never gave up.

"We decided were going to go out and play hard, swinging." Bradley said. "We never counted ourselves out."

The Celtics caught the Cavs at 95-all on Smart's 3-pointer and then matched the James and Co. basket for basket in the final minutes in one of the most entertaining games of what has been a mostly boring postseason.

Boston's Jonas Jerebko's baseline jumper put the Celtics ahead 108-106 with 30 seconds left before Irving scored on a drive to tie it with 10.7 seconds left.

Following a timeout, the Celtics perfectly executed a play drawn up by Stevens and worked the ball to Bradley, who found himself open and then calmly knocked down a shot that goes straight into Celtics lore.

For Cleveland, the loss was a wake-up call on their march toward a possible third straight Finals and a seemingly inevitable rematch with Golden State. The Cavs had been playing a glorified game of H.O.R.S.E. with the Warriors, who are undefeated and can complete a sweep of San Antonio on Monday night.

The Cavs hadn't lost since Game 4 of last year's Finals, and they came in tied with the 1988-89 Los Angeles "Showtime" Lakers for the longest winning streak in postseason history.

With Thomas back home, the Celtics could be forgiven for feeling down after Thomas, their inspirational leader was shut down with a hip injury he first sustained in March.

However, Stevens liked his team's energy leading up to tipoff and felt confident they would play hard.

"Our guys are itching to play," he said. "Obviously, we're here for a reason, and we've got tough-minded, competitive guys who have largely been guys that have had to really earn their way up in this league."

They earned their way back into the series.

Tip-ins
Celtics: Stevens said Thomas will visit hip specialists over the next few days and there's a chance the 28-year-old will need surgery. ... Stevens didn't review much of the Game 2 tape, but there's a mental image in his head of the Cavs making tough shot after tough shot that he can't shake. "As good as they are and they are tremendous, that might have been the best game I've ever seen a team play against us," he said. Does that mean college too? "Yeah, I think they would have beaten all those teams, too," he said, drawing laughter. ...

Cavaliers: James came in needing 73 points to pass Michael Jordan as the top scorer in postseason history. ... Cavs coach Tyronn Lue was an assistant in Boston and said his team reminds him of those Celtics teams with Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Rajon Rondo. "That was a tight group," he said. "They did everything together, dinners and everything." ... Cleveland is 14-0 when leading a series 2-0. ... Browns defensive end Myles Garrett, the No. 1 overall pick in this year's NFL draft, and fellow rookie Jabrill Peppers took a few shots on the floor before teams came out for warmups.

Give and Go: Should the Sixers take a run at J.J. Redick?

Give and Go: Should the Sixers take a run at J.J. Redick?

Before the offseason craziness starts, our resident basketball analysts will discuss some of the hottest topics involving the Sixers.

Running the Give and Go are CSNPhilly.com Sixers Insider Jessica Camerato and producer/reporters Matt Haughton and Paul Hudrick.

In this edition, we analyze if the Sixers should take a run at free-agent guard J.J. Redick.

Camerato
The Sixers should make Redick, an unrestricted free agent, one of their top targets this offseason. They have a glaring void on offense and Redick can fill those needs. 

The Sixers ranked 25th in scoring (102.4 points), 27th in field goal percentage (44.2) and tied with the Bulls for 24th in three-point percentage (34.0). 

The young team needs a boost in the backcourt. The Sixers' top three offensive pieces are in the frontcourt (Joel Embiid, 20.2 points per game; Dario Saric, 12.8 points per game) or on the perimeter (Robert Covington, 12.9 points per game). Nik Stauskas was the highest-scoring guard last season at 9.5 points per game. 

Enter Redick. He has made a lengthy career as a knockdown shooter. He also brings that veteran experience the Sixers are looking for as he enters his 12th season. Not to mention he knows what it takes to get to the playoffs, where he's been in all but one of his seasons. 

Redick averaged 15.0 points, 2.2 rebounds and 1.4 assists in 28.2 minutes for the Clippers this season. He shot 42.9 percent from three, 44.5 percent from the field and 89.1 percent from the line. Yes, his three-point shooting percentage did drop from a league-leading 47.5 percent last season, but he still finished fifth in the NBA. 

Redick will turn 33 in June. He played 78 games this season and has missed a total of only 15 games over the past three seasons. His age doesn't concern me given his role. Consider the long careers of other shooters: Jamal Crawford, 37, shot 36.0 percent from three in his 17th season. Manu Ginobili, who turns 40 in July, shot 39.2 percent from three in his 15th NBA season. The Sixers pursued both veteran guards last offseason. 

Haughton
With young talent already on the roster and more set to be added with the No. 3 overall pick, the Sixers could be in the market to add a significant free agent during the offseason.

While the backcourt — particularly shooting — is definitely an area to address, I'm not sure throwing money at Redick is the way to go.

Redick's offensive numbers have held steady throughout his 11-year career. He's a career 41.5 percent shooter from three-point range.

That's certainly an upgrade over anyone currently on the club, but is that really worth the reported $18-20 million per year Redick is seeking in a FA deal?

Not when you factor in his defensive shortcomings and the fact that the last time we saw Redick on the floor he looked every bit like a player about to turn 33 next month. He averaged 9.1 points per game (down from 15.0 in the regular season) during the L.A. Clippers' first-round playoff series against the Utah Jazz as he shot 38.0 percent from the field and 34.6 percent from three-point range.

Perhaps it was just a bad stretch or unfavorable matchup for the typically reliable shooter. It's at least worth thinking about before throwing a hefty contract offer Redick's way.

Hudrick
I've been going back and forth on this ever since Woj came out and said he expects the Sixers to pursue Redick. 

It makes sense that they would. Colangelo reportedly pursued veteran free agents Manu Ginobili and Jamal Crawford last offseason. Redick would seem to be a better fit than both of those players. He's younger (33) and he fits the team's biggest need: Shooting.

The Eagles took a page out of the Sixers' book by drafting a likely redshirt rookie in Sidney Jones. Perhaps the Sixers could now look to emulate the Eagles. The Eagles' offseason seems less about winning — although it may be a byproduct — and more about surrounding second-year quarterback Carson Wentz with weapons. Redick's sharpshooting would certainly play to the strengths of Embiid in the post and Simmons as a facilitator. 

Redick also has a reputation for being a great team player and locker room presence. He's seen plenty of playoff action, playing 88 (48 starts) postseason games. He's struggled in his last couple trips, but the Sixers can worry about that when they reach the playoffs. 

Then again, depending on the length of the deal, do the Sixers want to spend their money now when it might be better used elsewhere down the road? I'll say this: Redick is a better fit than Kyle Lowry and would make the team's two franchise players better. Why not give Redick a shot?