Philadelphia 76ers

Instant Replay: Nets 127, Sixers 97

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Instant Replay: Nets 127, Sixers 97

BOX SCORE

The Sixers hosted the Brooklyn Nets on Monday night at the Wells Fargo Center and the crowd quickly learned what rebuilding looks like in a 127-97 defeat.

The Sixers allowed the Nets to score 65 points in the first half, despite the Nets playing without Deron Williams, Paul Pierce, Jason Terry and Andrei Kirilenko.

Brooklyn converted 61 percent of its shots in the first half. The Nets shot 54 percent from the floor for the game and 52 percent from behind the three-point arc.

The Nets also scored 27 points off the Sixers’ 18 turnovers.

Turning point
It was clear from the start that the Sixers were overmatched. They gave up 38 first-quarter points, trailed by 16 points at the half and the Nets pushed that lead to 20 points early in the third quarter.

Follow the leader
Evan Turner led all scorers with 23 points. He added five rebounds and four assists for the game, while connecting on 6 of 7 free throw attempts.

Mirza Teletovic and Chris Johnson paced the Nets with 21 points apiece off the bench. Joe Johnson scored 18 points and shot 4 for 8 from the three-point line.

Stat-egic
Rebounding and bench play will be weaknesses for the Sixers on most nights this season. The Sixers were outrebounded 54-31 in the game and their bench was outscored 67-33.

Take a bow
Shaun Livingston has never averaged double-figure points in his eight-year career. Livingston was amazing for the Nets on Monday night. He made all seven of his field goal attempts for 17 points, grabbed nine rebounds and handed out eight assists.

Sixers first-round pick Michael Carter-Williams has been compared to the player Livingston was prior to suffering a gruesome knee injury five years ago. Carter-Williams finished with 12 points, four assists and two rebounds.

What’s next?
The Sixers play in Charlotte on Thursday with a rare 11 a.m. tipoff.

Warriors spurn White House; Knicks agree to trade Carmelo Anthony to Thunder

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USA Today Images

Warriors spurn White House; Knicks agree to trade Carmelo Anthony to Thunder

SOMERSET, N.J. -- The Golden State Warriors say they will not go to the White House when they visit Washington early next year, announcing the decision hours after President Donald Trump tweeted he was withdrawing the invitation.

Warriors star Stephen Curry had said he was not interested in the traditional event American championship teams usually have with the president. That raised Trump's ire, with the president citing what he called Curry's hesitation to accept.

The Warriors say they're "disappointed that we did not have an opportunity during this process to share our views or have open dialogue on issues impacting our communities that we felt would be important to raise."

Knicks agree to trade Carmelo Anthony to Thunder
NEW YORK - Carmelo Anthony won't be at Knicks training camp after all. He'll be in Oklahoma City, joining Russell Westbrook and Paul George in a loaded lineup.

The Knicks agreed to trade Anthony to the Thunder on Saturday, saving themselves a potentially awkward reunion next week with the player they'd been trying to deal since last season.

New York will get Enes Kanter, Doug McDermott and a draft pick, a person with knowledge of the deal said. The person spoke with The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the trade had not been announced.

The Knicks had said just a day earlier that they expected Anthony to be there when they reported for camp Monday. But it was clear they didn't want him anymore and he no longer wanted to be in New York, where he arrived with so much hype that was never fulfilled in February 2011.

He rarely had a championship core around him in New York but jumps right into one in Oklahoma City along with Westbrook, the NBA MVP, and fellow All-Star George, who was acquired from Indiana this summer.

Anthony will see his old teammates soon: The Knicks open the regular season at Oklahoma City on Oct. 19.

Anthony agreed to waive his no-trade clause to complete the deal, which was first reported by The Vertical.

Phil Jackson spent the latter part of his time in New York making it clear he wanted to move Anthony. But a deal was difficult because the 33-year-old forward has two years and about $54 million left on his contract, along with the ability to decline any trade.

He had long maintained that he wanted to stay in New York, but the constant losing and a chance to play with a talented lineup convinced him it was finally time to go.

After making the postseason each of his first 10 seasons, he has been on the sidelines the last four years and said at the end of last season his priority was a chance to win. He wouldn't have that in New York, where the Knicks are emphasizing youth and have little proven talent with which to surround Anthony.

But he is close with Westbrook and George and should fit in nicely. He can possibly settle into the spot-up shooter role he's played in the Olympics, where he's won a record three gold medals and is the career scoring leader for the U.S. men.

The trade ends an unfulfilling 6 1/2-year run in New York for Anthony, where he could never shake his reputation of an elite scorer who can't carry a team to a ring. The Knicks made the playoffs his first three seasons and reached the second round in 2013, when Anthony led the league with 28.7 points per game. But after that they never seriously proved they could do anything consistently beyond make headlines.

And Anthony was right in the middle of that, with constant trade speculation after Jackson's criticism of Anthony's game. Jackson and the Knicks parted ways in June and though the Knicks kept looking, team president Steve Mills and general manager Scott Perry told Anthony they wouldn't accept a trade that would hinder their plans to rebuild through youth.

It didn't help that Anthony had told the Knicks he would accept trades only to Houston and Cleveland, but a deal was finally found when he agreed to add Oklahoma City to his list of destinations.

Anthony moved into the top 25 on the NBA's career scoring list last season, and maybe the Thunder can help him reach elusive team success.

Jackson noted that the Knicks hadn't been able to win with Anthony, though one division title and three playoff berths give Anthony the best resume of anyone who played for the team in the 21st century.

He had higher aspirations when he pushed Denver to trade him to New York in 2010, a deal that finally went through in February 2011. But the Knicks gave up much of their young talent and future assets to get him, hindering their ability to fortify the team around their leading scorer in recent years.

Anthony averaged 22.4 points last season and made his 10th All-Star Game, though that was the second straight season he finished well off his career average of 24.8 per game.

Give and Go: Our predictions for the Sixers this season

Give and Go: Our predictions for the Sixers this season

With training camp starting next week, our resident basketball analysts will discuss some of the hottest topics involving the Sixers.

Running the Give and Go are CSNPhilly.com Sixers Insider Jessica Camerato and producer/reporters Matt Haughton and Paul Hudrick.

In this edition, we discuss our predictions for the Sixers going into the 2017-18 season.

Camerato
My prediction for the 2017-18 season has to do with an issue nagging the Sixers for years now. I expect the team to figure out the frontcourt logjam and establish more clearly-defined rotations.

The utilization of the bigs has not been consistent. Joel Embiid started when healthy. Jahlil Okafor started when Embiid was unavailable and was benched other times. Richaun Holmes’ season was a mix of starts, DNPs and G League appearances. And (there’s more), Nerlens Noel was on the roster up until the trade deadline. 

How much longer will this overcrowding at the five spot last? The situation is a bit tricky because of Embiid’s health. He has not been cleared for 5-on-5 and it remains to be seen how many games and minutes he will play. Okafor, in that case, has been the go-to fill-in starter. The Sixers remain open to trading Okafor. The current situation isn’t and hasn’t been, beneficial for either team or player. 

Holmes’ improvements should not be ignored this season just because he had accepted that backup-to-the-backup role. He made a strong case to become the backup center last season and the Sixers should give him the opportunity. 

The Sixers also will have to address the shooting guard position, where they are stacked since the addition of JJ Redick, who will see major minutes. Markelle Fultz, a point guard, also will play at the two spot. So what will that mean for Nik Stauskas or Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot? (Furkan Korkmaz is expected to spend time in the G League.) 

In enhancing their team this offseason, the Sixers now have to become a more balanced roster. My prediction is they will make moves to accomplish that.

Haughton
By now you’ve heard just about every prediction for the Sixers. So what’s one more?

The talk this summer has been about the Sixers finally getting through “the process” and reaching the postseason. Both current and former Sixers have guaranteed a playoff berth.

While I tend to agree, I also know it won’t be as easy as they are making it seem.

The Sixers are loaded with talent and potential. Neither of those qualities actually guarantee wins. Just ask the 2016-17 Minnesota Timberwolves.

The Sixers will have to incorporate several new key players and adopt an entirely different mindset of expecting to win instead of hoping to come out on top each night.

Then there’s the competition. The Eastern Conference remains top heavy with the best four squads likely still holding firm (Cleveland, Boston, Toronto, Washington).

After that, things get a little more wide open. Three of the bottom four seeds from last season’s playoff participants in the East lost their best players either to free agency or via trade (Atlanta: Paul Millsap, Indiana: Paul George and Chicago: Jimmy Butler).

That should definitely clear up some room for the Sixers to make a push for one of those back-end playoff spots, but don’t expect them to jump from the basement to the Eastern Conference Finals.

Hudrick
My prediction for the Sixers, much like everyone else's, is that they'll make the playoffs.

There is a caveat, however. If they don't make the playoffs, it's not the end of the world.

The Cavaliers and Celtics are the class of the East. And really it's not very close. After them, the second tier is the Raptors and Wizards. After that, it gets a little murky. Given the landscape of the Eastern Conference, it's certainly realistic to say the Sixers could make the playoffs.

But the Sixers shouldn't be worried about that. It would be outstanding for this young team's confidence (and how could you not feel great for Brett Brown after what he's dealt with the last four years) to make the playoffs, but their goals should be improvement and health. This team has some serious work to do to jell together and Brown has serious questions to answer about his rotation. It won't all be sorted out overnight.

Having the NBA playoffs back in Philly is going to be a blast, but let's focus on this team's development above all else.