NBA Notes: Kobe still weeks away from playing

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NBA Notes: Kobe still weeks away from playing

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. -- Although Kobe Bryant says he's making steady progress in his recovery from a torn Achilles tendon, the Los Angeles Lakers' guard is still a few weeks away from playing in a game.

Bryant is back with the Lakers after a short trip to Germany to get treatment on his right knee, another trouble area for the 35-year-old guard.

He sat on Los Angeles' bench for an exhibition game Tuesday, and he'll travel with the team to China later this week.

Bryant is running with his full body weight on a special treadmill, and he has done light jogging and calf exercises recently.

He says he'll still need three weeks of conditioning to get into game shape, citing six months of eating "everything" while sidelined (see full story).

NBA: Odom pleads not guilty to DUI
LOS ANGELES -- NBA player Lamar Odom has pleaded not guilty to a misdemeanor count of driving under the influence in connection with his arrest in August.

Odom didn't appear in court for the arraignment Wednesday and his attorney entered the plea on his behalf. A pretrial hearing was set for Nov. 8.

The DUI charge against the 33-year-old former Los Angeles Lakers and Clippers player includes an allegation that Odom refused to take a chemical test. According to California law, a motorist forfeits their license for a year if they refuse a breath or blood test.

He was arrested Aug. 30 after his Mercedes-Benz SUV was spotted weaving on a freeway in the Studio City section of Los Angeles. The California Highway Patrol said Odom's vehicle was observed traveling in a "serpentine manner."

Odom remains free on $15,000 bail. The husband of reality TV star Khloe Kardashian could face six months in jail and a $1,000 fine if convicted.

Odom played for the Clippers last season. He is now a free agent.

Nets: Garnett puts Boston-area home on market
CONCORD, Mass. -- NBA star Kevin Garnett has put his Boston-area home on the market for nearly $5 million.

Garnett was traded to the Brooklyn Nets in June after six seasons with the Boston Celtics that included the 2008 NBA championship.

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage announced Wednesday that the asking price for the 11,000-square-foot home in Concord is $4.85 million.

The home is on nearly 13 acres and includes five bedrooms, five full bathrooms, and a four-car garage. It also has a wine cellar, media room and gym. The property has been highlighted in Metropolitan Home and Architectural Record and received an excellence citation from the Boston Society of Architects.

Garnett and his wife, Brandi, said in a statement they "will always treasure the experiences and memories" they had in the home.

Sixers see light after latest round of roster turnover

Sixers see light after latest round of roster turnover

By the time reporters were admitted to the Sixers' locker room some 75 minutes before Friday's home game against Washington, the nameplates above the cubicles previously occupied by Nerlens Noel and Ersan Ilyasova had long ago been changed.

Where Noel once sat, in the corner nearest the shower room, there was now a "47 Splitter" nameplate for veteran center Tiago Splitter, who came over from Atlanta in the deal that sent Ilyasova to the Hawks two days earlier.

Where Ilyasova once sat, between Robert Covington and Dario Saric, there was now a "23 Anderson" nameplate for second-year forward Justin Anderson, acquired from Dallas (with Andrew Bogut, who is expected to head to Cleveland once his contract is bought out) in the trade that sent Noel there.

Across the locker room, there was no nameplate at all above the space once filled by rookie guard Chasson Randle. He had been cut when the two trades went down, collateral damage in this latest upheaval, this latest change to an ever-changing landscape.

Out in the hallway a few minutes earlier, coach Brett Brown had reinforced the message general manager Bryan Colangelo delivered to reporters during a news conference earlier in the day -- that all this had been necessary. Noel and Ilyasova are destined for free agency this summer (Noel will be restricted, Ilyasova unrestricted). The Sixers were unlikely to match any outside offer Noel is sure to attract, and just as unlikely to give Ilyasova the long-term deal he craves.

So, buh-bye.

Brown has grown used to all the tired and huddled masses shuffling through town.

"Historically, we all know how we treat people that walk through a door," he said. "We shake their hand and we say, ‘Guard somebody.’"

He settled on the word "appropriate" to describe all the roster turnover.

"There needs to be a frugal and, at times, ruthless approach," he said, "that you genuinely believe that (a certain player is) a keeper, that ultimately can play in the playoffs and ultimately play deep in the playoffs."

That rationale has not exactly set well with the masses. Not when the haul for two rotational players amounted to two injured 32-year-old centers -- Bogut is always hurt, and Splitter had hip surgery last February -- not to mention a guy who was unable to see regular action for a sub-.500 Dallas club and draft picks of dubious worth.

But if the front office has not inspired confidence, some solace can be taken from what we now see on the court. There are keepers on the roster beyond Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons. There are guys the Sixers can hang their hats on. The first two post-deadline games -- Friday's 120-112 victory over the Wizards and Saturday's 110-109 loss to the Knicks -- have proven as much.

Consider Covington. Once a mere spot-up shooter, he can now do a little something off the dribble. And he guards Carmelo Anthony's last-second dagger Saturday notwithstanding.

Covington had 20 points and 10 rebounds in that game, 25 and 11 against Washington.

Then there's Saric, who makes up for whatever he might lack in athleticism with savvy belying his 22 years. The rookie forward stretched his own double-double streak to four by generating 19 points and a career-high 15 rebounds against the Knicks.

He also has the endorsement of Colangelo, who during Friday's presser was asked about the view that the Sixers were returning to their tanking ways this season.

"I think I say Dario Saric, he's the answer (to that question) for us,” he told reporters.

Hey, no pressure, kid.

"Maybe some kind of pressure," Saric said before Friday's game. "For sure it's pressure, but I think I can say it's more attention on me. … But I will try to put everything on the side. I will try to not think so much about what he said. Of course, it's a positive thing, but I will not try to press myself."

He and Ilyasova were close. They shared a position, power forward, and while Ilyasova is from Turkey and Saric from Croatia, they very much spoke the same language.

"He was like some kind of mentor to me," Saric said. "He helped me a lot."

Especially on those occasions when the younger man got down on himself, as he did at times during the first few months of the season.

"He'd say, ‘It's one game. We have another game in 24 hours. You need to change your mindset and be ready for the next game,’" Saric said of Ilyasova.

Without his safety net, and with the expectations of the franchise now resting on his shoulders to some extent, Saric put up 20 points and 11 boards while making his 12th career start Friday night and his first since Feb. 2.

In one glittering second-quarter stretch, he hit a step-back jumper from the mid-post when he found himself in a mismatch against one Washington guard, John Wall, then backed down the other guard, Bradley Beal, and scored with the left hand. There was also an elbow jumper, not to mention a lefty post move over Otto Porter.

"The first 10 minutes, I tried to find myself," Saric said. "OK, I got a couple good assists, a couple good rebounds, but still I tried to find myself. It's a new role. I tried to play, tried to run, tried to find the rhythm of the game, which is most important thing in basketball. I got (into) the game after seven, eight minutes, maybe 10 minutes, and I'm happy. I had a good game, you know?"

Anderson didn’t play, but saw nearly four minutes of daylight against the Knicks, missing his only shot. Splitter, recovering from his hip surgery (as well as resultant calf issues), has not dressed for either game.

"Tiago right now is unhealthy," Brown said Friday.

Which is news to Splitter. Asked when he might be available, he said, "I hope soon. I was in full practice with the Hawks. … I saw the trainer (Kevin Johnson) today. They were happy with what they saw, and see."

Sixers fans, meanwhile, have mostly been seeing red of late. But if they look closely enough, they can see some reason for hope, too.

Report: Andrew Bogut expected to sign with Cavaliers after buyout from Sixers

Report: Andrew Bogut expected to sign with Cavaliers after buyout from Sixers

Andrew Bogut, we hardly knew ye. 

After coming over from Dallas as part of the Nerlens Noel trade, Bogut is already thinking about his next move.

With the Sixers expected to buy out Bogut's contract, the former No. 1 overall pick will look to sign with the Cavaliers, according to ESPN's Tim MacMahon. 

The Sixers swapped Noel for Bogut, Justin Anderson and a top-18 protected first-round pick -- which will likely turn into two second-round picks -- last Thursday. 

With LeBron James begging the front office for help, the Cavaliers are also expected to sign Bogut's former Dallas teammate Deron Williams on Monday, according to The Vertical's Shams Charania