Possible NBA lottery reform could affect Sixers


Possible NBA lottery reform could affect Sixers

Tank 2.0 will be a harder sell if the NBA makes it tougher to secure the pot of gold at the end of the lottery rainbow.

According to a report by Zach Lowe at Grantland, the NBA competition committee is reviewing a new lottery reform proposal. The wheel -- a different suggestion that has staunch proponents and detractors -- has evidently been supplanted by a new idea that would alter the current lottery odds in an attempt to discourage tanking for the top pick. They might as well call it the “Sam Hinkie Cease and Desist” plan.

At present, the team with the worst record has a 25 percent chance of getting the first pick in the NBA draft, one of the most valuable assets in the league. The team with the second-worst record has a 19.9 percent chance of getting the best pick. The odds decrease at various intervals from there.

Under the new plan, according to Lowe, the four worst teams would have almost the same chance of getting the top pick: Around 11 percent. That’s a significant shift. After finishing with the second-worst record a year ago, the Sixers had a one in five chance of getting the top pick. Under the new plan, that would have been closer to a one in 10 chance.

Teams that just missed the playoffs but landed at the back end of the lottery would benefit under the new system. The last lottery team would go from having a 0.5 percent chance at the top pick to two percent.

The proposal includes a system in which the top six picks are selected via ping-pong balls, with each subsequent pick being slotted in order from worst to best record. The current system selects the first three picks via ping-pong balls, then slots the rest by record.

Lowe wrote that there are various concerns about the proposal, including that it might encourage fringe playoff teams to tank and go for a better lottery pick than was previously available. (Basically, the teams at the back of the lottery might tank toward the end of the season instead of the teams at the front tanking all year.) The timing and how it might help, hurt or alter strategies that have already been implemented by various general managers (looking, once again, in Hinkie’s direction) is also an issue. Despite all that, NBA commissioner Adam Silver is evidently “serious about tweaking the lottery system, possibly as early as next season,” according to Lowe.

The “possibly as early as next season” part is disconcerting if you’re in favor of the long-term approach outlined by the Sixers over the last year. They are clearly set up to double their efforts on that front next season in an attempt to secure better chances at another top lottery pick. It seems unlikely that the NBA could put the new plan in place that quickly. Unlikely, but not impossible. Which is why there has to be at least a little concern over at Sixers HQ about all this.

This particular proposal was probably not submitted by the Sixers. Just a hunch on that.

Report: Sixers anthem singer Sevyn had contract barring political statements

Report: Sixers anthem singer Sevyn had contract barring political statements

Sevyn Streeter, the performing artist who claimed Wednesday that the Sixers replaced her for the national anthem because of her intent to wear a jersey with the words "We Matter," signed a contract that prohibited political statements, according to CBS3's Jan Carabeo.

Per the report, Streeter was offered an alternate shirt and told she could wear her own shirt in the stands after the performance.

"I was angry, extremely, extremely angry and disappointed and honestly brought to tears by all of it. It broke my heart," Streeter told The Associated Press. "Honestly, I was very excited about being able to perform the national anthem. I was really looking forward to that."

The Sixers didn't directly confirm or deny the allegation but responded with the following statement:

"The Philadelphia 76ers organization encourages meaningful actions to drive social change. We use our games to bring people together, to build trust and to strengthen our communities. As we move from symbolic gestures to action, we will continue to leverage our platform to positively impact our community."

This statement is consistent with efforts being made throughout the NBA calling for action over gestures, as detailed in a feature in B/R Mag. 

“I’m past the gestures,” Carmelo Anthony told B/R Mag. “I’m past that. It’s all about creating things now and putting things in motion. So, that’s what I’m on. I’m trying to get guys on board with that and help them understand that — enough of the gesturing and talking and all of that stuff — we need to start putting things in place.” 

Despite shooting struggles, Dario Saric impressive in Sixers' regular-season debut

Despite shooting struggles, Dario Saric impressive in Sixers' regular-season debut

After two years filled with will he or won't he speculation over joining the Sixers, this certainly wasn't the effort Dario Saric had envisioned for his NBA regular-season debut. 

"I felt comfortable, but sometimes it's not your day and this was my bad day," said Saric, who scored five points in the Sixers' 103-97 season-opening loss to the Oklahoma City Thunder. "I'll try to watch the video and fix what I can fix and move forward."

The raw numbers look bad. The rookie forward shot 2 of 12 from the field, including 0 of 4 from three-point range. He did notch seven rebounds and two assists, but also contributed two turnovers.

But as you know, numbers don't always tell the story. 

Saric displayed the offensive versatility and headiness on defense that had the Sixers salivating over him for two years while he played for Anadolu Efes in Turkey. He was able to penetrate in the lane several times against the Thunder on Wednesday night and used pump/head fakes to get his defender off balance, but the shots just didn't fall.

"He struggled with his shot," Sixers head coach Bett Brown said. "But just the physical play, some of the intellect of guarding things suddenly that we all might not pay attention to that coaches do. You see him go out of his way to make a rotation, that he just felt the game. I think that some of his pick-and-roll reads on trying to hit cutters, trying to slow up rollers and still go back to shooters like (Ersan) Ilyasova is, stood out to me.

"He's intelligent. He is a smart basketball player. The stats will show that he didn't make some of his shots, but I think that just that gamesmanship, that intellect stands out to me." 

The only time Saric looked a tad overmatched is when OKC went to its mustachioed muscle tandem of Steven Adams and Enes Kanter inside. After the game, Brown lamented leaving Saric in for so long against that pairing, which combined for 33 points and 17 rebounds on the night.

Teammate Jahlil Okafor tried to come to Saric's aid in those moments, but returning from a torn meniscus and on a minutes restriction, his plan wasn't exactly met with enthusiasm by the coaching staff.

"I actually kind of hinted to the coaches that I wanted to play with him (Embiid) because they put Kanter and Adams in," Okafor said. "I was kind of hinting to the coaches that if they want to play big ball we can play big ball with them."

Their response?

"Stay disciplined. Have your lawyer call my lawyer," Okafor said with a laugh. "That's the go-to line."

Even with Saric's few hiccups on defense, Okafor is confident the 22-year-old Croatian will be able to hold his own against NBA players and get the buckets to start dropping on the offensive end.

"I love Dario. It's been a pleasure having him around," Okafor said. "He's such a selfless guy.

"He did struggle a little bit with his shot, but all of the shots that he missed are shots that we know he can make and shots that we've seen him make since he's been here. So we're good. We know what he's going to do."