Philadelphia 76ers

Turner snaps Sixers' skid with OT buzzer-beater

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Turner snaps Sixers' skid with OT buzzer-beater

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It’s no coincidence that the Sixers’ seven-game losing streak ended when rookie point guard Michael Carter-Williams returned from a seven-game absence.

Carter-Williams is what makes the Sixers go and it was proven in the 121-120 overtime victory over the Brooklyn Nets at the Wells Fargo Center Friday night (see Instant Replay).

Posting 15 points, 10 assists and three steals in his first game back, Carter-Williams was the first one to grab Evan Turner after his driving layup bounced on the rim three times before rolling through for the game-winner at the buzzer.

“It felt like it bounced on the rim 150 times,” Turner said. “I got a couple of good rolls. The basketball gods were looking out for me.”

Turner was ready in case the gods had forsaken him, too. If the ball would have rolled off the rim, Turner said (jokingly) that he was, “just thinking of my reaction if it didn't go in, who I was going to punch.”

Yes, that’s what a long losing streak can do to an 8-19 team.

“We needed to get that win for the sanity of the group, keeping our group together, holding hope,” Sixers head coach Brett Brown said. “For those reasons, as that ball is hanging on a rim and then decides to fall in, for us, given where we are, that is an important win.”

Less of a coincidence is the way players like Turner, Thad Young and Tony Wroten performed with the rookie point guard back in the lineup. With Carter-Williams commanding the ship, there was less of a burden for others to match his production.

As if they could.

“I think he helps Evan and I think he helps everyone,” Brown said about Carter-Williams.

That’s especially the case for Friday night’s hero, Turner. Without the point guard on the floor, Turner shot 38 for 105 (36.2 percent) from the field and scored 13.3 points per game with 12 combined points in the last two epic losses.

But Friday night, Turner was a force, shooting 13 for 22 for a game-high 29 points and 10 rebounds. Turner made his first eight shots to pace the Sixers through the first half, but it was the last two that were the most important.

Turner hit a three-pointer from the corner with 3:12 remaining in overtime to give the Sixers a one-point lead. It was a lead that grew to four points when Young buried a three from the same spot with 2:03 to go.

But four straight misses coupled with a long jumper from Deron Williams and a three-pointer from Paul Pierce left the Sixers down to their last shot.

Afterwards, in the victorious locker room, the Sixers expressed a lot of relief that the losing skid was over. Considering that the team lost to the Nets at the Barclays Center by 36 points just two days after losing by 34 to Portland, Brown thought his team showed a lot of heart.

Maybe heart was all the Sixers had left.

Take Young, for example. It hasn’t been the easiest week for the seven-year veteran. After practices and shootaround, Young has patiently and cordially fielded questions about his future in Philadelphia and trade rumors that seemingly pop up out of thin air (see story).

Despite this, Young has been the model of professionalism. Always a straight shooter, Young didn’t shy away from the questions. More importantly, Young didn’t let it affect his performance on the floor, either. Maybe some players would have been bothered by the off-court distractions, but Young has been able to leave that stuff behind.

Against the Nets, Young scored 25 points on 11 for 18 shooting with three three-pointers, six rebounds, four assists, three steals and a blocked shot.

Trade that guy?

“Like I told you, at the end of the day I don’t let that stuff affect me or the way I play,” Young said. “I just hoop. This is what I’m paid to do. I’m paid to do a job and provide a service and this is what I’m going to do. Any stories that come up about trades and stuff don’t bother me. I don’t pay attention to it, I just play and that’s what I’m going to continue to do. I play my butt off.”

Young won’t find any argument from Brown, who asked his veteran to guard point guard Deron Williams as well as seven-footer Brook Lopez in the post.

“How about Thaddeus Young? That was a performance,” Brown said. “That’s who he is.”

And maybe with Carter-Williams back in the lineup, the Sixers showed who they are on Friday night? After all, the Sixers are 1-10 without the rookie point guard and 7-9 with him.

The Sixers kick off a six-game road trip Saturday night in Milwaukee. After the game, the team returns home for a week before heading off to Phoenix and Los Angeles.

Give and Go: What is the biggest challenge for Brett Brown this season?

Give and Go: What is the biggest challenge for Brett Brown this season?

With training camp starting next week, our resident basketball analysts will discuss some of the hottest topics involving the Sixers.

Running the Give and Go are CSNPhilly.com Sixers Insider Jessica Camerato and producer/reporters Matt Haughton and Paul Hudrick.

In this edition, we discuss the biggest challenge for head coach Brett Brown this season.

Camerato
For years Brett Brown has faced the challenge of piecing together a shorthanded roster to put some kind of, any kind of, rotation on the floor. This season he will have healthier players to work with, and that in itself will pose a different set of challenges.

Brown has a young roster that is eager to play. Former No. 1 pick Ben Simmons has been waiting nearly 12 months to make his NBA debut since suffering a Jones fracture on the last day of training camp. Markelle Fultz, this year’s top pick, has not played since mid-February as a student-athlete at Washington. Joel Embiid last suited up on Jan. 27 before undergoing season-ending knee surgery.

These hungry players, and it is not limited to only the three mentioned above, will want to be in the game as much as possible. Brown will be tasked with managing eagerness and anxiousness to play all while following medical guidelines and restrictions. Lineups could change from a night to night based on player availability (back-to-backs, rest, etc.). Brown will have to establish consistency and flexibility at the same time, also keeping his players on board even if they can’t be on the court as much as they would like to be.

Haughton
Brett Brown will face a whole new world as head coach of the Sixers in 2017-18. He’ll have to find a way to make a rookie backcourt work, mix contributing veterans into the fold and, for the first time in his tenure, face some semblance of pressure to win.

But Brown’s biggest obstacle next season has nothing to do with X’s and O’s or wins and losses. The coach must maintain the spirit of the process.

At first glance, you may think that has something to do with continuing to lose games for the highest possible draft pick. No, not at all. In fact, it’s quite the opposite.

In Brown’s four years at the helm, the Sixers have lost a combined 253 games. Some close, some by a wide margin and far too many of the nightmarish variety.

But no matter the previous game’s score, Brown always had his players on the court for the next matchup ready to give their max effort. His ability to stay positive amid the mounting losses and still push his guys to play all out every single night is somewhat remarkable (see story). It’s what the players love about him the most.

The egos that go along with high-level talent and the pressure of playoff aspirations mean Brown is sure to encounter some new challenges. However, it may just be that process mentality that gets the Sixers fully over the process.

Hudrick
For the last four years, Brown has barely had enough healthy players to form an entire team. And even when he had healthy players, most of them were borderline D-Leaguers (now G-Leaguers, of course).

The blessing and the curse for Brown this season is having real, NBA talent up and down his roster.

Nerlens Noel is gone so the logjam at center is over, right? Nope. Embiid is your starting center and franchise cornerstone. Richaun Holmes proved last year that he is a capable backup at the pro level. Jahlil Okafor is still here and needs to prove he's healthy if the Sixers hope to move him. Oh yeah, the team also went out and signed veteran Amir Johnson away from the Celtics. The uncertainty behind Embiid's status means there will be minutes available, but how many? Bottom line: This team still has four NBA-caliber centers.

The newest challenge for Brown is an overabundance of guards/wings. With Fultz, JJ Redick and a now healthy Jerryd Bayless added to the mix, where does that leave T.J. McConnell, Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot, Nik Stauskas, Justin Anderson and Furkan Korkmaz?

Sure, it's a nice problem to have, but figuring out the rotation on an improving roster will be the biggest challenge for Brett Brown this season.

Sixers notes, quotes and tidbits: Simmons' defensive assignment; Saric's role

Sixers notes, quotes and tidbits: Simmons' defensive assignment; Saric's role

Sixers coach Brett Brown reiterated Wednesday that he plans to use Ben Simmons as his point guard this season, while adding that Markelle Fultz will not be excluded from “decision-making and point guard-type of responsibilities” on occasion.

Brown also didn’t rule out using the 6-10 Simmons as a small-ball center.

Simmons and Fultz have been the top picks in each of the last two drafts, but Simmons missed last season while his broken right foot healed.

Simmons, who played a single season at LSU, is “an elite passer,” in Brown’s estimation, as well as a guy who has “jaw-dropping” speed.

Brown has also found that the 6-4 Fultz, selected after the Sixers engineered a trade with Boston for the most recent No. 1 choice, is very coachable. And his skill set is as advertised.

There will be times, as a result, when each runs the point.

“Once the ball is missed and you have sort of jailbreak, Markelle’s going to be in (the) open court with the ball,” Brown said. “He will be at that point one of the primary ballcarriers. When it’s a static situation and you’ve got to run a play at the start of the year, Ben Simmons will have the ball. … At the start of the game and it’s a dead ball, we’re going to give Ben the ball.”

Defensively, Brown envisions Fultz playing opposing point guards and Simmons guarding power forwards. The matchups with the other projected starters are also conventional. Joel Embiid will play centers, Robert Covington will guard the other team’s best wing and JJ Redick will check the other wing.

Brown also said Simmons “has a chance to be an elite defender,” though his reputation in college was otherwise. Fultz also played a lot of zone in his lone year at Washington.

The Simmons-at-center discussion was an interesting one. Brown said it is “possible” he will use Simmons – or possibly 6-10 Dario Saric – in that capacity at times, noting that the Warriors closed games with no one bigger than 6-7 Draymond Green (and more recently, 6-10 Kevin Durant) on the court.

“When you get down to the last six minutes, inevitably it ends up a smaller game,” Brown said.

As for Simmons’ health, president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo said that hasn’t been a concern for a while.

“He’s playing 5-on-5,” Colangelo said, “and dominating the gym.”

Fluid rotation
Much is still to be determined about the rotation, given the presence of veterans like Amir Johnson, Jerryd Bayless, Richaun Holmes, Nik Stauskas and (possibly) a slimmed-down Jahlil Okafor.

And what of Saric? He averaged 12.8 points and 6.3 rebounds as a rookie last season, while appearing in all but one game. There is speculation that he might wind up the sixth man, but Brown is not yet certain about that.

“His gift of basketball intellect is high, and so when you say where does he fit in, I’m saying anywhere we want,” he said. “Where does he fit in to start games, end games, I don’t know. I just know that in my opinion, that’s probably the Rookie of the Year (last season), and his skill package and his toughness and his intellect will be fit in where it’s needed most -- in a timely fashion, we believe.”

Milwaukee guard Malcolm Brogdon was chosen Rookie of the Year, while Saric and Embiid made the All-Rookie team. Now Saric is one of many players for whom Brown must find time.

“The gym’s going to tell us a lot,” he said.

And, he added, “I feel the first third of the season is going to be a lot of learning for all of us.”

Playoffs?
Playoff talk has been rampant for a while, and when asked by Ian Thomsen of NBA.com about that, Colangelo said, “Forecasting that would definitely, I believe, be unrealistic. But hoping for that? It’s on everybody’s mind.”

Colangelo revisited that on Wednesday.

“I don’t think it’s unrealistic to want to be in the playoffs, or have a goal to be in the playoffs,” he said. “That is our goal, but (there are) things you have to look at with respect to the situation we find ourselves in.”

He pointed out the difficulty of making the postseason with two rookie guards. According to the Sixers’ research, it hasn’t happened since Houston did so in 1998-99, with a backcourt of Cuttino Mobley and Michael Dickerson.

Then there is the matter of incorporating the other new pieces, like Redick and Johnson.

“I think it’s premature to throw anything out with respect to a number (of victories) or any goal,” Colangelo said, “but I would say our objective is to make the playoffs.”

Brown, 75-253 in his first four years on the job (including last year’s 28-54), knows the team is “in a different phase,” as he put it, and understands how difficult it can be to take the next step. At the same time, he too is caught up in the excitement of the playoff talk, which has in part emanated from the players.

“I really don’t say anything to them about tempering expectations,” he said. “I like them saying stuff. Then you’ve got to own it. … Words are one thing, actions are another.”

But certainly he likes how hard they have worked in the offseason, and sees the potential.

“Years ago,” he said, “I heard a phrase: ‘If they show you who they are, believe them.’ That’s over a period of time. … On first glance, when I check some of our guys, I think they have a real chance for greatness. We aspire to win a championship in the city. Then you want another one, and then another one.”