Will injuries force teams like Sixers into a trade?

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Will injuries force teams like Sixers into a trade?

If there has been one element to define the 2012-13 NBA season its been big injuries to franchise players. Obviously, Andrew Bynum has been among the most notably absent this season, but the Sixers are hardly alone.

The Mavericks missed Dirk Nowitzki for a long period while the Timberwolves have played without Kevin Love, the Bulls without Derrick Rose and the Wizards without John Wall. Then there are the Cavaliers who have been without both Kyrie Irving and Anderson Varejao and the Lakers have missed Steve Nash.

Thats an All-Star team of injuries right there.

In the Sixers Atlantic Division, every team has faced a significant injury to a key player, and for the most part, teams (and fans) have not panicked or rushed out to make moves to fill gaps.

At least not yet.

For now, the plan for the Sixers, as well as every other team in similar predicaments, is to hold the fort until the reinforcements arrive. For the most part, that plan has worked well for teams in the Atlantic, though it hasnt always been easy. Patience has won out across the league.

We just have to wait and be patient and try to get some answers, said Sixers general manager Tony DiLeo last Friday when discussing the shape of his roster. We want to see how Andrew fits in and how our players fit in with him.

Dont expect teams to be patient for too much longer, though. With the NBA trade deadline set for Feb. 21, GMs may be chomping at the bit with some big names reportedly being shopped around.

Could the Sixers be kicking a few tires and looking to make a move? Probably. Its no secret the team is looking to add a backup point guard with reported inquiries made for Oklahoma Citys Eric Maynor. But the Sixers likely wont make any type of move until Bynum returns or until closer to the deadline.

When we made the trade for Bynum, we built the team around him, DiLeo said. Thats one of the questions we have to answer.

In the meantime, here are a few of the players that could be traded before the Feb. 21 deadline:

Rudy Gay, Memphis
Why would one of the best teams in the West be looking to move its leading scorer? Easy ... money. Gay is signed through the 2014-15 season and is owed approximately 37 million over the next two seasons.

Tyreke Evans, Sacramento
The Chester, Pa. native is still just 23 years old and has an expiring contract. He also is playing in basketball limbo with the dysfunctional Kings and his stats have dropped off a bit as a result.

DeMarcus Cousins, Sacramento
Incredibly talented, but troubled, Cousins may need a change of scenery. Then again, that change could be Seattle whenif the Kings become the Sonics.

Derrick Williams, Minnesota
Reports are that the Twolves have already soured on the 2011 No. 2 overall draft pick and are looking to move him. Then again, reports seem to indicate that all-star Love has soured on Minnesota.
Pau Gasol, Los Angeles Lakers
What good is a list of players on the trading block without the perennially tradable Gasol? Where could Gasol go? How about to any team willing to pay his 20 million salary next year.

As for the Sixers potential trade chips:

Nick Young
He took his first DNP-CD during Saturday nights victory over the Rockets and isnt much of a defender. He does, however, have something that a lot of teams are interested in -- an expiring contract. Young was dealt at the deadline last season from Washington to the Clippers. Could he be on a fourth different team in a little less than a calendar year?

Dorell Wright
Another expiring contract and at a relative bargain of 4.1 million. What also makes Wright more attractive than Young is that he actually plays some defense.

Royal Ivey & Damien Wilkins
Expiring contracts.

E-mail John R. Finger at jfinger@comcastsportsnet.com

NBA Playoffs: Kyrie Irving's 42 points spark Cavs' comeback win over Celtics

NBA Playoffs: Kyrie Irving's 42 points spark Cavs' comeback win over Celtics

BOX SCORE

CLEVELAND -- Kyrie Irving gritted his teeth, tightened up his left sneaker and hopped to his feet.

The pain couldn't stop him. The Celtics couldn't either.

Irving took over in the second half and finished with 42 points despite playing on a tender ankle, LeBron James added 34 and the Cleveland Cavaliers moved within one win of an almost inevitable third date in the NBA Finals with Golden State by rallying to beat Boston 112-99 on Tuesday night in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference finals.

With James in foul trouble, Irving was forced to do more than ever and he delivered, scoring 19 in less than five minutes and 33 in a 19-minute stretch.

"The kid is special," James said. "I was happy to sit back and watch him. He was born for these moments."

The defending NBA champions, who shot 71 percent in the second half, opened a 3-1 lead in the series and can wrap up their third straight conference title -- and a "three-match" against the Warriors -- with a win in Game 5 on Thursday night in Boston.

But if Games 3 and 4 are any indication, it won't be easy.

Fighting to keep their season alive, the Celtics aren't giving an inch despite playing without All-Star guard Isaiah Thomas, who may need surgery on a hip injury.

The Cavs, meanwhile, wouldn't be on the cusp of the Finals without Irving.

With Cleveland in jeopardy of dropping its second game in a row after James followed an 11-point Game 3 debacle by picking up four first-half fouls, Irving put on a breathtaking one-man show.

Freezing Boston defenders with his dribble and driving to the basket whenever he wanted, Irving made six layups, two 3-pointers and a free throw in a dizzying span of 4:48. He capped his blistering 19-point outburst with a 3 in the final second of the quarter and celebrated at mid-court by pretending to put two pistols back in his holster.

"He saw Bron went out and he wanted to put the team on his shoulders," Cavs coach Tyronn Lue said. "He did that."

Irving said he was driven by the thought of the Cavs seeing their series lead vanish.

"In the back of my mind, I thought, `They can't tie up the series,'" he said. "We can't go back to Boston tied 2-2. We needed everything tonight."

Irving put a scare into the Cavs and their fans when he stepped on Terry Rozier's foot and rolled his ankle. He stayed on the floor for a few moments before sitting up and re-tying his sneaker. Nothing was keeping him out.

"It was one of those games we had to fight through and we had to earn it," he said.

Celtics coach Brad Stevens was disappointed with his team's defense on Irving, who was able to spread the floor while surrounded by shooters.

"There's choices," Stevens said. "I'm not sure there are good choices. When he gets going like that, he's tough to stop. The ones we gotta look at are the ones he got at the rim."

Kevin Love added 17 points and 17 rebounds for the Cavs, now 11-1 in the postseason.

Avery Bradley scored 19 and Jae Crowder 18 for Boston.

Ankle grab
Irving did not show any noticeable limp following the game as he walked down the hallway, stopping to hug and kiss friends and family following his performance.

Irving, who has had a history of injuries, said he's rolled his ankle enough times to know when it's serious.

"My adrenaline is still going," he said. "I'm pretty sure I'll be sore when I get home."

Boston bound
Crowder and the Celtics are looking forward to going home and redeeming themselves after the blowout losses in Games 1 and 2.

"I feel like we're humble enough to know we haven't played well at home," he said. "We want to give our home crowd a better outing than we put out the past two games."

Foul trouble
Lue paused for several seconds before responding to a question about the third and fourth fouls called on James, who was whistled for barely touching Marcus Smart on a jumper and then was called for a charge.

"They called them," he said of the officials. "We had to do what we had to do."

Tip-ins
Celtics: Thomas spoke to coach Brad Stevens and told him that he has visited one hip specialist and plans to see more before it's decided if he needs surgery. Thomas initially injured his hip in March and played the final two months of the regular season before aggravating it during the playoffs. ... Stevens started Kelly Olynyk, who had 15 points. ... Before the playoffs began, the Celtics were 22-5 at home since Jan. 1. They're 5-4 in the postseason so far.

Cavaliers: The 42 points were a career playoff-high for Irving, who scored 41 in Game 5 of last year's Finals. ... Cleveland improved to 35-5 against Eastern teams in the playoffs since 2015. ... J.R. Smith and his wife, Jewel, brought their daughter home after more than five months in the hospital following her premature birth. Smith posted photos on his Instagram account of the couple leaving Hillcrest Hospital with their baby in a stroller. "We Walked In Together We Walked Out Together!!" Smith wrote. ... Deron Williams played 18 minutes after sustaining a shoulder "stinger" in Game 3.

Up next
The Celtics lost Game 2 at home by 44 and the first two games of the series by a combined 57.

NBA draft prospect Josh Jackson's diversion requires apology, anger management classes

NBA draft prospect Josh Jackson's diversion requires apology, anger management classes

LAWRENCE, Kan. -- Former Kansas basketball player Josh Jackson must attend anger management classes, write a letter of apology and refrain from using alcohol or recreational drugs for a year as part of a diversion agreement arising from his confrontation with a Jayhawks women's basketball player last year.

Jackson, who is leaving Kansas after one season and is expected to be a top pick in next month's NBA draft, had pleaded not guilty to a misdemeanor count of criminal property damage after he argued with McKenzie Calvert on Dec. 9 outside a bar in Lawrence.

Jackson signed the diversion agreement on April 26, according to Douglas County Court records obtained by The Kansas City Star . If he successfully completes the program, the case against him will be dismissed.

He is required to complete the anger management class and community service by Oct. 31 and write the apology letter and obtain a substance abuse evaluation by June 30. If the evaluation doesn't make any treatment recommendations, Jackson must complete alcohol information classes by Oct. 31.

Jackson also signed a "stipulation of facts" that said he followed Calvert out of the bar after she threw a drink at fellow Kansas player Lagerald Vick. He said he yelled at Calvert and called her names before she got into her car and locked the doors.

"I kicked her vehicle, breaking the left rear taillight and denting the driver's door," Jackson said in the document.

A damage estimate of Calvert's car for $2,991 was given to police in December, according to a Douglas County District Court affidavit. The total repair bill was $3,150, which included $1,127 for the driver's door and left tail lamp. Jackson was not charged with felony criminal damage in excess of $1,000 because prosecutors couldn't prove that he caused all the damage to the car "due other unidentifiable individuals damaging the vehicle," according to county District Attorney Charles Branson.

He was ordered to pay $158 in court costs, $150 in a diversion fee and $250 in restitution to Timothy Calvert, McKenzie's father. If Jackson violates his 12-month diversion, he would pay restitution of $3,150 to Calvert.

The 6-foot-8 swingman was the nation's No. 1 recruit when he signed with the Jayhawks out of Prolific Prep Academy in California. He immediately earned a spot in the starting lineup, teaming with national player of the year Frank Mason III and Devonte Graham to form one of the nation's top backcourts.

Jackson was the Big 12 newcomer of the year after averaging 16.3 points and 7.4 rebounds. He helped the Jayhawks to a 31-5 record and a 13th straight regular-season Big 12 title before a loss to Oregon in the Elite Eight of the NCAA Tournament. He has signed with former NBA player B.J. Armstrong of Wasserman Media Group.