Philadelphia 76ers

Zoo's Views: Not necessary to deal veteran core

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Zoo's Views: Not necessary to deal veteran core

A report recently surfaced that Thaddeus Young has asked the 76ers for a trade. Young promptly denied the rumor (see story) and proceeded to go on probably the finest four-game tear of his NBA career.

There might be the assumption that Young is showcasing himself so that a deal gets done. In fact, some seem to think Young, along with veterans Evan Turner (restricted free agent-to-be) and Spencer Hawes (unrestricted free agent-to-be) are as good as gone anyway.

It is, of course, the job of team president and general manager Sam Hinkie to decide if that happens. In the meantime, I would postulate a housecleaning that includes any or all of the above named players is not a foregone conclusion. Furthermore, I might even advocate keeping one, two or all of them.

Let’s start with Young. If you’re trying to create a winning culture, Young is certainly a good guy to have around. He’s a blue-collar worker who plays both ends of the floor and never complains no matter what he’s asked to do by his coach. Isn’t that what you’re trying to instill in the rest of your players?

Turner is a much sought-after commodity in the NBA, a player who can create his own shot and at the same time fill the stat sheet. If his renewal comes at the right price, it’s something the Sixers might want to consider.

Coming into Sunday's game in Los Angeles against the Lakers, Hawes had accomplished something only Tim Duncan had done -- averaging at least 14 points, 9.0 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 1.5 blocks per game. Plus, Hawes has the added ability to stretch the floor with his outside shooting, something that is also coveted by NBA teams. Again, if the price is right, why not hold onto him?

Finally, consider that all three bring two other assets to your team. They’re all veterans, which is something you’ll need to mix in if you’re rebuilding with youth (even with them, the Sixers had the NBA’s youngest roster on opening night). At the same time, Young, Hawes and Turner are all just 25 years old, leaving them with plenty of good basketball in front of them.

Michael Carter-Williams seems to have all the makings of a future star. Nerlens Noel is an athletic big man who may one day have an impact. Also, this summer the Sixers hold two potential lottery picks in one of the best drafts in years, and money under the salary cap, even with potential financial commitments to Hawes and Turner.

What moves could they make trading any combination of Young, Hawes and/or Turner that could improve that situation?

Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons among Sixers at Eagles' home opener

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Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons among Sixers at Eagles' home opener

Philly teams supporting Philly teams.

Sixers head coach Brett Brown, Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons, Robert Covington, Richaun Holmes and Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot attended the Eagles’ home opener together Sunday.

While the Sixers watched the Eagles' game against the Giants from a suite, Embiid still high-fived with fans during the afternoon.

The Sixers and Eagles have close ties. Justin Anderson has longstanding friendships with Torrey Smith, Rodney McLeod and Chris Long (see story)

Sunday is the final day of the Sixers' offseason. Media day will be held Monday and training camp begins Tuesday at their training complex in Camden, New Jersey. 

Donald Trump starts war with sports, and athletes have united

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Donald Trump starts war with sports, and athletes have united

OAKLAND -- As President Donald Trump lurches closer to certified insanity, he is unwittingly doing the country a great service that, should we survive his dangerously whimsical term, will bring us closer to realizing our potential.

He’s unifying the previously disconnected and energizing the formerly apathetic. He’s even shaming some of those previously beyond shame.

It is because of Trump’s rage, unleashed in a span of less than 24 hours, that the NBA champion Warriors were more united Saturday morning than they were Friday afternoon.

After a speech in Alabama urging NFL owners on Friday to fire any “son of a bitch” who dared to protest peacefully to shine a light on injustices, Trump woke up Saturday and turned his Twitter ire upon Stephen Curry and the Warriors, conceivably the most wholesome representatives of American sports.

“That’s not what leaders do,” Curry said after practice Saturday.

“We know we’re in a fight,” Warriors center David West said. “And we’re going to continue to fight for our right to be human beings.”

But by advocating the job loss of peaceful protesters and then informing the Warriors they are not welcome at the White House -- because Curry said he’s not in favor of going -- we can only hope Trump has flung open a door of activism that never closes.

Trump’s radical combo ignited mighty blasts of blowback from players and coaches and commissioners of the NBA and NFL.

Among the many NBA figures issuing statements in one form or another, with varying degrees of condemnation: LeBron James, Chris Paul, Kobe Bryant, Magic Johnson, the players association and commissioner Adam Silver.

“The amount of support I saw around the league this morning was amazing,” Curry said.

Among the many NFL figures who were moved to comment: Seahawks players Richard Sherman and Michael Bennett, Broncos lineman Max Garcia, 49ers owner Jed York, New York Giants owners John Mara and Steve Tisch, Packers boss Mark Murphy, the players association and commissioner Roger Goodell.

Trump has, in short, started a war with American sports.

His strike began with the comments made Friday night that were directed at Colin Kaepernick and others who have declined to stand for the anthem. Trump’s aggression intensified Saturday when he went after Curry in the morning and Goodell in the afternoon.

How did we get here?

The Warriors on Friday announced their plan to meet as a team Saturday morning to decide whether they would accept from the White House the traditional invitation extended to championship teams. Though it was fairly certain they would not, they left open the slightest possibility. General manager Bob Myers had been in contact with White House.

Curry at the time said he, personally, did not wish to go, and then he carefully and patiently expounded on his reasons.

Trump responded, at 5:45 a.m. Saturday, to tell the world that the Warriors would not be invited and, moreover, that Curry’s resistance is the reason.

And all hell broke loose.

The Warriors came back Saturday afternoon with a statement that made clear there no longer would be a team meeting on the subject, that they were disappointed there was no open dialogue and that they will instead utilize their February visit to “celebrate equality, diversity and inclusion -- the values we embrace as an organization.”

“Not surprised,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said of Trump’s decision not to invite the Warriors to the White House. “He was going to break up with us before we could break up with him.”

Trump has fired upon every athlete in America. He is waking up this country in ways we’ve never seen or felt and, my goodness, he’s doing so at a level we’ve needed for centuries.

“Trump has become the greatest mirror for America,” West said. “My cousin . . . she brought that to me. Because there are a lot of things have been in the dark, hidden, and he’s just bold enough to put it out on ‘Front Street.’"