Union to honor Soumare trade request

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Union to honor Soumare trade request

CHESTER, Pa. -- Bakary Soumare has had enough of the bench and his time with the Union.

Following the Union’s loss to Sporting Kansas City on March 2, and with his failure to crack the opening day lineup, Soumare immediately requested a trade, according to Union coach John Hackworth on Wednesday.

The Union have agreed to honor his wishes.

“After the game against Sporting KC, Baky came to [Union CEO and Operator Partner] Nick Sakiewicz and then to myself asking to be traded because he is not happy not being a starter,” Hackworth said. “He felt like he was in the prime of his career and that’s what he came here to do. Absolutely respect that and I understand where he’s coming from.

“As of now, Baky is a Philadelphia Union player but I can’t tell you how this is going to go. I’m hopeful we can find a resolution for both us and him. There’s a reason we brought him here and reason he’s still here.”

Acquired as the cornerstone of the Union back line in January, 2012, Soumare, 27, suffered a mix of injury and roster competition, limiting him to just one start in his first year with the Union. With optimism that he would be the Union’s go-to center back in 2013, the 6-foot-4 defender was once again left out of Hackworth’s plans, which favored Amobi Okugo at that position.

“That’s the core thing I want to get across -- the reason Baky’s situation changed from when he arrived to now is that Amobi Okugo has been a revelation,” Hackworth said. “We put him at center back, he was really good last year and continued that. Our recent results (2-1-0) are evidence of that continuing. When you have players playing that well you have tough decisions. Baky or Amobi at center back is the toughest one.”

An interesting caveat of the Soumare situation is that Hackworth did intend to give the Mali national selective starts, in particular a shot against the Colorado Rapids in the Union’s second game. However, asking for a trade one week prior, Soumare made it clear he wasn’t interested in sharing time on the field.

“It changes the coach’s mindset when you have a player who says he’s not happy and wants to be somewhere else,” Hackworth said. “It has a major effect. Baky is a good pro, so we’ve been very honest and up front with each through the whole process. I told him we would be looking to play him against Colorado and asked him it would change anything for him. He said no. He wanted to see if there were any opportunities out there for him. That’s why Baky was on the bench against Colorado.”

Asked what he expects in return for Soumare, Hackworth was unsure.

“We need to make sure we make a good decision for the Philadelphia Union,” the coach said. “I can’t tell you if it would be for money or a trade for a player. We weigh those options and have for the last two weeks. This has been going on.”

Without Soumare in reserve, the Union appear short at center mid. And although the team has admitted to contemplating a depth move, Hackworth says he feels fine with his squad moving forward without Soumare in the mix.

“We have options that we are comfortable with,” Hackworth said. “It doesn’t mean we want to lose Baky but if he did leave, I’d feel comfortable that if something happened to Jeff [Parke] or Amobi, that we could deal with it properly.

“You have a veteran like Chris Albright, who has played as a center back, Sheanon Williams has also played there. We know what he’s capable of. We could move Ray Gaddis back to his natural right back and then we’d look at familiar options at left back. In our locker room already we feel like we have options.”

Bruce Arena rehired as U.S. soccer coach to replace Jurgen Klinsmann

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The Associated Press

Bruce Arena rehired as U.S. soccer coach to replace Jurgen Klinsmann

NEW YORK -- Bruce Arena is returning to coach the U.S. national soccer team, a decade after he was fired.

The winningest coach in American national team history, Arena took over Tuesday, one day after Jurgen Klinsmann was fired. The 65-year-old Arena starts work Dec. 1.

With the U.S. 0-2 in the final round of World Cup qualifying for the first time, the U.S. Soccer Federation wants to spark a turnaround when competition resumes March 24 with a home game against Honduras followed four days later with a match at Panama.

"We need to build the chemistry of this team and have a common goal and really work on a team concept," Arena said during a telephone news conference. "I really believe individually and positionally we have good players and we've just got to get them working together as a team.

"There are no real secrets on how you build good teams: It takes a lot of hard work, it takes communication, it takes discipline and it takes some talent, and I think we have enough talent to build a good team and end up in Russia 2018. It's going to take a little time, a little bit patience and a lot of hard work."

Arena first took over as national team coach after the 1998 World Cup and led the U.S. to a 71-30-29 record. His contract runs through the 2018 World Cup.

"I don't view it as Bruce 2, but sort of Bruce 2.0," U.S. Soccer Federation President Sunil Gulati said. "I think he's got far more experience than he did when he had the national team the first go-round. He's proven and reproven many times at all levels of the game in the United States that he's an extraordinarily capable and successful coach."

A wisecracking Brooklynite known for blunt talk and sarcasm, Arena coached the University of Virginia to five NCAA titles from 1978-95, then led D.C. United to titles in Major League Soccer's first two seasons before losing in the 1998 final. He guided the Americans to the team's best World Cup finish since 1930, a 1-0 loss to Germany in the 2002 quarterfinals.

Arena was let go after the team's first-round elimination by Ghana in 2006. He coached the New York Red Bulls of MLS from July 2006 to November 2007, then was hired the following August by the Galaxy. He led the team to MLS titles in 2011, 2012 and 2014.

Arena was inducted into the U.S. National Soccer Hall of Fame in 2010.

"I think 10 years later I'm better prepared for this job than I was in 1998 and 2002 and ultimately 2006, so I'm hopeful the experiences I had are going to benefit the program," he said. "One of the things you learn from experience is you see things a lot clearer and a lot quicker than you did previously, and the game has slowed down a bit, where I can see as a coach in my position how things are happening on the field.

Jurgen Klinsmann fired as U.S. soccer coach; Bruce Arena could get job

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USA Today Images

Jurgen Klinsmann fired as U.S. soccer coach; Bruce Arena could get job

NEW YORK — Jurgen Klinsmann was fired as coach of the U.S. soccer team Monday, six days after a 4-0 loss at Costa Rica dropped the Americans to 0-2 in the final round of World Cup qualifying.

Los Angeles Galaxy coach Bruce Arena is the favorite to succeed Klinsmann, and his hiring could be announced as early as Tuesday. Arena coached the national team from 1998 to 2006.

Qualifying resumes when the U.S. hosts Honduras on March 24 and plays four days later at Panama.

"While we remain confident that we have quality players to help us advance to Russia 2018, the form and growth of the team up to this point left us convinced that we need to go in a different direction," U.S. Soccer Federation President Sunil Gulati said in a statement. "With the next qualifying match in late March, we have several months to refocus the group and determine the best way forward to ensure a successful journey to qualify for our eighth consecutive World Cup."

A former German star forward who has lived mostly in southern California since retiring as a player in 1998, Klinsmann replaced Bob Bradley in July 2011 and led the team to the 2013 CONCACAF Gold Cup title and the second round of the 2014 World Cup, where the Americans lost to Belgium in extra time.

But the U.S. was knocked out by Jamaica in last year's Gold Cup semifinals and lost to Mexico in a playoff for a Confederations Cup berth. The team rebounded to reach the Copa America semifinals before losing to Argentina 4-0. But this month Mexico beat the Americans 2-1 at Columbus, Ohio, in the first home qualifying loss for the U.S. since 2001.

And last week, the Americans were routed in Costa Rica, dropping to 0-2 in the hexagonal, as the final round of World Cup qualifying in North and Central America and the Caribbean is known.

While there is time to recover, given the top three teams qualify for the 2018 tournament in Russia and the fourth-place finisher advances to a playoff against Asia's No. 5 team, players seemed confused by Klinsmann's tactics, such as a 3-4-1-2 formation.

"Today we made the difficult decision of parting ways with Jurgen Klinsmann," Gulati said. "There were considerable achievements along the way ... but there were also lesser publicized efforts behind the scenes. He challenged everyone in the U.S. Soccer community to think about things in new ways, and thanks to his efforts we have grown as an organization and expect there will be benefits from his work for years to come."

Arena was inducted into the U.S. National Soccer Hall of Fame in 2010. As U.S. coach, he led the Americans to the 2002 World Cup quarterfinals in the team's best finish since 1930.

After the team's first-round elimination in 2006, he was let go by Gulati. Gulati unsuccessfully courted Klinsmann, who won the 1990 World Cup with West Germany and the 1996 European Championship with Germany.

When Gulati and Klinsmann couldn't reach an agreement, the USSF hired Bob Bradley, who coached the team to the second round of the 2010 World Cup. A year later, the team stumbled in the Gold Cup and Klinsmann replaced Bradley.