Union looking to keep cool vs. rival DC United

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Union looking to keep cool vs. rival DC United

With seven yellow cards, one red and 35 combined fouls against Toronto FC last Saturday, the Union were frustrated by the physical play, angered by the refereeing and close to unraveling, before Jack McInerney tied the game in stoppage time.

Now set to face bitter rival DC United at RFK Stadium on Sunday in what will likely be a another volatile contest, coach John Hackworth is asking his veterans for more on-field leadership.

“There were a couple incidents against Toronto where I would have preferred some better leadership out there,” Hackworth said. “Not better, because I don’t want to criticize [captain] Brian [Carroll] or anyone else, but I think there was a place for guys to say, ‘Hey, look. This is clearly what’s happening in this game, let’s settle down. Let's not worry about all this BS going on.’ We can’t control the officials and we can’t control the antics, it’s not our problem, so let's focus on us. We talked about it already and every guy in that locker room feels the same way.”

Since the Union joined the MLS in 2010, their battles with DC United have been extra physical and rife with fouls and bad blood. In 2012 alone, the Union and the United racked up 16 yellow cards and five red cards in just four US Open Cup and MLS regular-season games.

“I think just from the cities,” Union right back Sheanon Williams said. “Philly doesn’t like Washington and Washington doesn’t like Philly. I think we can sense that between the fans. And obviously them being an Eastern Conference team, that makes them a foe. I don’t know what makes it so much bad blood but there’s definitely something there. It just gets heated sometimes. Hopefully there won’t be any red cards or anything like that. We want to play a good game. We want to do what we like to do. That doesn’t include red cards and stupid fouls.”

The rivalry has been so heated, that even during preseason exhibition games the two clubs bumped heads. On Feb. 23 in Orlando, DC United’s Dwayne De Rosario got into an altercation with Danny Cruz, which saw De Rosario shown a straight red card and ejection.

“It happened again in preseason when we played them and we got a couple of red cards and a couple of other things,” Williams said. “It’s just a heated game any time we play them. Obviously, both teams want to win. And with the position both teams are in, these points are going to be pretty big.”

With DC United holding a 1-4-1 record and the Union sitting at 2-2-2, both clubs enter Sunday with a much-needed win on their mind. The contest is so vital to the Union’s Eastern Conference success, that both Union players and coaches want to avoid an emotional foul-fest on the road.

“It’s definitely tough,” Williams said on suppressing the high emotion. “You get some blood rushing to your head and you want to do something that maybe you wouldn’t do normally. You just have to think about how that will effect your team, and if it’s going to be in a negative way then you try to hold back and restrain yourself. You go out there to help the team, not to hurt them. So anything you do you’re going to be held responsible for in the long run. You have to keep your cool and do what you need to do.”

Andre Blake the Union's first MLS Best XI team member since 2010

Andre Blake the Union's first MLS Best XI team member since 2010

Andre Blake continues to rack up the accolades.

A couple of weeks after being named MLS Goalkeeper of the Year, the rising Philadelphia Union star was named to the MLS Best XI team as one of the league’s top players in 2016.

The rest of the team included:

• Forwards Sebastian Giovinco (Toronto FC), David Villa (New York City FC) and Bradley Wright-Phillips (New York Red Bulls)
• Midfielders Ignacio Piatti (Montreal Impact), Sacha Kljestan (Red Bulls), Mauro Diaz (FC Dallas) and Giovani dos Santos (LA Galaxy)
• Defenders Matt Hedges (FC Dallas), Axel Sjoberg (Colorado Rapids) and Jelle Van Damme (Galaxy)

Blake’s inclusion on the Best XI is not a surprise considering he already took home top goalkeeper honors. Even though he didn’t have the best numbers in the league, he made the spectacular look ordinary in his first full season as an MLS starter.

But it is unique for the Union, who haven’t had a player make the Best XI since Sebastien Le Toux was included for his 14-goal, 11-assist effort in Philly's 2010 expansion season.

Union winger Chris Pontius, who recently won the 2016 MLS Breakout Player of the Year award, made Best XI while with D.C. United in 2012. Former Union players to be honored on the prestigious list were Bakary Soumare with Chicago in 2008 and Justin Mapp with Chicago in 2006.

Another big honor like this will likely only increase the chatter that Blake could be sold to a big team in Europe soon. But a couple of weeks ago, the Union goalkeeper insisted his only focus for 2017 is on Philadelphia.

“From a personal standpoint, I’m hoping to have an even better season than 2016,” he said at the time. “To be able to go in and be consistent and do everything I can for the Union — and maybe be the goalkeeper to get them their first [MLS] Cup.”

Bruce Arena rehired as U.S. soccer coach to replace Jurgen Klinsmann

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The Associated Press

Bruce Arena rehired as U.S. soccer coach to replace Jurgen Klinsmann

NEW YORK -- Bruce Arena is returning to coach the U.S. national soccer team, a decade after he was fired.

The winningest coach in American national team history, Arena took over Tuesday, one day after Jurgen Klinsmann was fired. The 65-year-old Arena starts work Dec. 1.

With the U.S. 0-2 in the final round of World Cup qualifying for the first time, the U.S. Soccer Federation wants to spark a turnaround when competition resumes March 24 with a home game against Honduras followed four days later with a match at Panama.

"We need to build the chemistry of this team and have a common goal and really work on a team concept," Arena said during a telephone news conference. "I really believe individually and positionally we have good players and we've just got to get them working together as a team.

"There are no real secrets on how you build good teams: It takes a lot of hard work, it takes communication, it takes discipline and it takes some talent, and I think we have enough talent to build a good team and end up in Russia 2018. It's going to take a little time, a little bit patience and a lot of hard work."

Arena first took over as national team coach after the 1998 World Cup and led the U.S. to a 71-30-29 record. His contract runs through the 2018 World Cup.

"I don't view it as Bruce 2, but sort of Bruce 2.0," U.S. Soccer Federation President Sunil Gulati said. "I think he's got far more experience than he did when he had the national team the first go-round. He's proven and reproven many times at all levels of the game in the United States that he's an extraordinarily capable and successful coach."

A wisecracking Brooklynite known for blunt talk and sarcasm, Arena coached the University of Virginia to five NCAA titles from 1978-95, then led D.C. United to titles in Major League Soccer's first two seasons before losing in the 1998 final. He guided the Americans to the team's best World Cup finish since 1930, a 1-0 loss to Germany in the 2002 quarterfinals.

Arena was let go after the team's first-round elimination by Ghana in 2006. He coached the New York Red Bulls of MLS from July 2006 to November 2007, then was hired the following August by the Galaxy. He led the team to MLS titles in 2011, 2012 and 2014.

Arena was inducted into the U.S. National Soccer Hall of Fame in 2010.

"I think 10 years later I'm better prepared for this job than I was in 1998 and 2002 and ultimately 2006, so I'm hopeful the experiences I had are going to benefit the program," he said. "One of the things you learn from experience is you see things a lot clearer and a lot quicker than you did previously, and the game has slowed down a bit, where I can see as a coach in my position how things are happening on the field.