Pierce Sets New Records as Owls Soar over Buffalo 34-0

Pierce Sets New Records as Owls Soar over Buffalo 34-0

LINCOLN FINANCIAL FIELD—Bernard Pierce's assault on the Temple record book continues.

Crossing the goal line for the 44th touchdown of his college career, the junior running back is now the all-time leader in TDs scored by a Temple Owl, passing Paul Palmer's previous record of 43. This is the second week in a row Pierce has broken a Palmer record; he set a new program-high for career rushing touchdowns scored by an Owl last week at Ball State.

Of course, its one thing for Bernard to break someone else's record, but he's beginning to break some of his own.

Pierce's second touchdown of the day, the one that set the aforementioned career TD record, also marked his 17th touchdown of the season. That score sets a new Temple record for the most touchdowns by an Owl in a single season. The previous record of 16 was set in 2009 by, you guessed it, then-freshman running back Bernard Pierce.

Handing the ball off to Pierce, Chester Stewart was as good as he needed to be under center. In slightly less than three quarters of work, Stewart went just 7-11 passing, but it was all Temple needed, as both Pierce and second-string runner Matt Brown both rushed for over 100-yards for the second week in a row. The offense accumulated 400 total rushing yards by the end of the game.

On defense, the Owls posted their second shut out in two weeks and their second-consecutive shut out of the Buffalo Bulls. Aided by the offense's ability to force three-and-outs and dominate the time of possession, the Temple D surrendered just 155-yards on Saturday, and did not allow Buffalo a first down until the second quarter of play.

Indeed, the Owls were solid in all three phases of the game, with punter/kicker Brandon McManus turning in another fine performance. Despite some of the strong winds whipping through Lincoln Financial Field Saturday afternoon, McManus was able to put both of his field goal attempts through the uprights and convert on all four of his extra point opportunities.

Transitioning from kicker to punter, McManus drilled a 71-yard punt down wind that was eventually downed at the Buffalo 4. After having that kicked called back on a illegal formation penalty, he once more stepped up to boot his next punt in excess of sixty yards. He nearly put a third quarter kickoff into the seats behind the north end zone.

Having some special teams success of his own, running-back-turned-linebacker Ahkeem Smith found himself on the receiving end of a fake punt, direct snap. Smith went 49 yards into the end zone, putting Temple up 24-0, and effectively ending the game in the second quarter.

Add to that a Kee-Ayre Griffin blocked field goal and the Owls' special teams may have managed to out-perform an offense that ended the game with a total 458 yards from scrimmage.

Still, like always, the team will need to move on and begin to focus on its next game at Bowling Green. As head coach Steve Addazio said after the game, "That's great that we had two great weeks; but this world, this whole society, always want to take its foot off the gas. But if we do, we won't have a good week and we'll put ourselves in harm's way [like after the Maryland game]."

If this Temple team can bear down and keep its focus and over the course of its remaining schedule, it'll be their opponents in the MAC Championship game who will find themselves in "harm's way."

Josh Norman goes WWE on division, ready for Alshon Jeffery

Josh Norman goes WWE on division, ready for Alshon Jeffery

Josh Norman is going all WWE on the NFC East. 

Washington's outspoken cornerback is featured in a lengthy Q&A with Bleacher Report and he's, well, outspoken. 

He starts in the story by saying crazy things like this: "I feel like King Leonidas leading an army into battle, leading troops into defending your territory."

Yeah, off to a good start. 

He then goes after his nemesis Odell Beckham Jr. hard, calls Dez Bryant "just a guy" and even has some thoughts on new Eagles receiver Alshon Jeffery. 

Norman praised receivers Julio Jones and Antonio Brown, saying there aren't those types of challenging players in the NFC East. He was asked if there was any player he has circled on his schedule. 

Jeffery was the one that came to mind. 

"Alshon [Jeffery] is going to be with us this year," Norman told Bleacher Report. "He's a big guy. He uses his body. And I enjoy going against big guys because they think they can get physical with me. They think that. That's quite the contrary."

Norman will get his shot against Jeffery in the opener, when the Eagles travel to Washington on Sept. 10. 

Comparatively, Jeffery got off easy. Norman was much less complimentary when speaking about Beckham, with whom he has an infamous history, and Bryant, the Cowboys' top receiver. 

On Bryant: "That's a guy. Just a guy. Dez was Dez in 2012, '13, '14. Maybe '14. Now? He's a guy."

Norman might have a little point with Bryant, who has failed to go over 800 yards in either of his last two seasons. In 2016, he caught 50 passes for 796 yards and eight touchdowns. From 2012-14, Dez was over 12,000 yards with at least 12 touchdowns in each of the three seasons. 

He even called Bryant a "fake tough guy" for his behavior on the field.  

But even Bryant got off easy. 

There's no secret about the way Norman feels toward Beckham. And Norman didn't hold anything back. Based on his comments, the WWE speak may turn into WWE-type action during the 2017 season. 

Here's a part of the Q&A about ODB: 

You get Beckham twice a year now.

Yeah, and that game gets so hyped up by the time we play them, it won't even be Giants vs. Washington—it'll be me and him. You know what I'm saying? It's like when it becomes bigger than the game. ... Because now you have us on Thanksgiving Night. C'mon, man!

So when you think of Odell, what is his game?

He tries to be a tough guy. He tries to put on this persona which he's not. Because he's always going to have his head on a swivel. Always. Always when we play each other. He's scary like that. He does things that he normally wouldn't do because of all the pressure and added hype that he has to put on his whole persona. He's not this guy. If you go back and watch the games in which we play compared to the games we don't play each other, he's a totally different guy.

How so?

When people get physical, tough, like the Minnesota game, he acts out. He's a kid. He's a big kid, man.

Like messing around with a kicker's net.

When you really, really want to see what a person's really like, you get in their face, you smell what they ate and you take their soul from them. How do you do that? You put your fist right into their chest and you see what they're made out of.

And you did exactly that with him. What did you see in Beckham?

You see a person who's actually not what they're made out to be. Because they come back at you. And that's not him. They come back at you in a way like, "He's not going to punk me! He's not going to sissy me out!" All right! But then when you go and you do things you're not accustomed to doing, that's pretty much what it is.

This is going to be fun. 

Throughout the whole thing, Norman speaks like a classing wrestling heel. If nothing else, the trash talk is going to make the NFC East more fun. 

ESPN hires Chip Kelly as college football studio analyst

ESPN hires Chip Kelly as college football studio analyst

Former Oregon coach Chip Kelly is joining ESPN as a studio analyst next season.

ESPN announced Friday it has signed Kelly to a multiyear deal.

Kelly will primarily be part of Saturday pregame, halftime and wrap-up shows on ESPN2. He'll also provide NFL analysis on Sundays during SportsCenter.

The 53-year-old Kelly spent the last four seasons in the NFL, coaching the Philadelphia for three years and San Francisco for one. Kelly was fired by the 49ers after going 2-14 last season. He was 26-21 with a playoff appearance for the Eagles.

Before jumping to the NFL, Kelly spent four seasons as Oregon head coach and went 46-7. In 2010, Kelly led the Ducks to the BCS title game and was The Associated Press coach of the year.

"I spoke with a lot of people this offseason about different situations for me -- in coaching and TV," Kelly said in a statement. "I had various opportunities in both. In the end, I have had a relationship with ESPN for many years from when I was coaching and after speaking with them, I decided it was the best step for me to take."

Kelly figures to be in demand at the college level when head coaching jobs begin opening next season. Spending a season or two doing television has been a common path for coaches between jobs. Urban Meyer spent a season at ESPN between resigning from Florida and landing at Ohio State. So did Rich Rodriguez after being fired by Michigan and before being hired by Arizona.

"I have been a coach for nearly the last 30 years," Kelly said. "Working in television will allow me to see the game from a different perspective, but I didn't take the job with the intention it will lead to something specific. I love the game of football and working with good, smart people; ESPN presents an opportunity to combine those two things."

Kelly will fill an opening left by Butch Davis, who became head coach at Florida International.

Kelly was considered one of the most innovative coaches in college football. His up-tempo spread offenses dominated defenses and were mimicked by teams all over the country.

"As a coach, he saw the game from a unique perspective, never afraid to take an unconventional approach," said Lee Fitting, ESPN senior coordinating producer. "We want him to bring that mentality to our college football coverage each week, offering fans a varying viewpoint outside of the conventional thought process."