Really, Chuck? Barkley Thinks Sixers Should Tank, Calls Out Collins's Ego for Costing Team Precious L's

Really, Chuck? Barkley Thinks Sixers Should Tank, Calls Out Collins's Ego for Costing Team Precious L's

All right, so we're now officially at that point that the Sixers have inevitably found themselves just about each of the last five seasons--the point where it's time to decide whether to either make a hard push for a low playoff seed and likely first-round exit, or to trade away veterans, rebuild around youth, and pile up losses in the hopes for a high draft position. Is a short playoff run worth potentially sabotaging the team's long-term future? Then again, is a high draft pick who might end up being unable to help turn things around (see: Turner, Evan) worth wasting an entire season?

It's a hotly debated issue, and one with no true right answer. However, gray areas never stopped Charles Barkley from being absolute in his opinion before, and it certainly didn't stop him when, as reported by Inquirer writer Bob Ford, Chuck stopped Ford at Soldier Field recently to ask him at a pertinent question about the Sixers:

"Why is Doug Collins trying to win games?" Barkley said. "That's stupid. They should develop the young guys and try to get a better draft pick."

Barkley said he didn't mind being quoted -- duh -- so I'm passing that along for what it's worth.

"Doug's a great coach. Don't get me wrong," Barkley said. "But sometimes coaches get carried away with their own egos. But in a situation like this, it's not about them."

Now, there is some arguable truth to a couple of points made by the Chuckster here. Personally, I'm in agreement that they should be making more of an effort to play their young'ns, a move which would be greater facilitated by trading veterans Andre Iguodala and/or (in a dream world) Elton Brand. (Though with Jrue Holiday and Jodie Meeks starting and Evan Turner and Thaddeus Young playing about thirty minute a game off the bench these days, it's not like Collins is shackling the kids to the bench, either.) And certainly some have made the point that the only way out of the Sixers' recent run of mediocrity is to lose badly for a few years, amass some high draft picks, and rebuild in the recent Blazers/Thunder/Clippers mold. Fair enough.

But to throw ex-TNT buddy Doug Collins under the bus for having the "ego" to actually try to win games? Come now, Charles. Last I checked it was still in the job description of NBA head coach to at least try to, you know, not lose. If the Sixers were 10-34 right now instead of 19-25, would everyone in Philly be applauding Collins's rebuilding effort, saying "Now there's a coach who knows what's best for his team long-term"? Doubtful. More likely, we'd be killing him for not getting any kind of progress out of a young, talented team, and probably calling for his job faster than you can say "Eddie Jordan." (Or "Tony DiLeo." Or "Mo Cheeks." Eh.) 

I guess by this logic, Wolves coach Kurt Rambis and Wizards coach Flip Saunders must be the most humble, grounded individuals in pro sports right now. If that's true, I guess I don't mind a little boastfulness and braggadocio from my head coach after all.

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

Best of NHL: Trocheck's last-second goal lifts Panthers past Blues

ST. LOUIS -- Vincent Trocheck scored with just under 5 seconds remaining to lift the Florida Panthers to a 2-1 victory over the St. Louis Blues on Monday night.

Jonathan Marchessault also scored and James Reimer stopped 26 shots to help the Panthers complete a 5-0 road trip -- their first perfect trip of at least that many games in franchise history.

Reimer has won five straight decisions and has not lost in regulation since Jan. 7 against Boston, going 6-0-1 since.

The Panthers moved into a tie with Boston for third place in the Atlantic Division, but have the edge because they have a game in hand on the Bruins.

Kyle Brodziak, playing for the second time after missing 10 games due to a broken foot, scored for the Blues and Jake Allen finished with 31 saves. St. Louis lost its second straight since winning six in a row (see full recap).

Coyotes use three-goal 1st period to beat Ducks
GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Radim Vrbata capped Arizona's three-goal first period and the Coyotes held on for 3-2 victory over the Anaheim Ducks on Monday night.

Christian Dvorak and Jakob Chychrun also scored for Arizona, and starting goalie Mike Smith had 27 saves before leaving about 4 1/2 minutes into the third period after a collision in the net. Marek Langhamer helped kill a power play after being pressed into action for his NHL debut and stopped six of the seven shots he faced.

The Coyotes have won four of their last six.

Langhamer gave up Ryan Getzlaf's second goal of the night with 26.8 seconds to play, but thwarted two quality shots in the final seconds.

Jonathan Bernier gave up three goals on six shots in the first period for the Ducks. John Gibson came on to start the second and stopped all 14 shots he faced (see full recap).

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid admits to reaggravating foot injury after 2014 surgery, almost quitting

Joel Embiid trusts the Process, more so than anyone — the process of patience.

After sitting out two whole seasons because of foot injuries, Embiid learned the importance of patience the hard way.

Appearing on NBA TV's Open Court, Joel Embiid opened up about how he reaggravated the fracture in his foot that cost him the 2015-16 season.

"I didn't know how to deal with patience," Embiid said on the roundtable discussion. "I just wanted to do stuff, that's why I think I needed a second surgery, because after my first one, I just wanted to play basketball again. I just wanted to be on the court and I pushed through what I wasn't supposed to.

"At one point I thought about quitting. I just wanted to come back home and just forget everything."

Embiid goes on to discuss the Sixers' turnaround this season and his mindset during his recovery. Watch the full clip below. 

Embiid also said he models his game after Hakeem Olajuwon.