Sergei Bobrovsky Is the New Nik Vucevic, And the Hits Just Keep on Coming

Sergei Bobrovsky Is the New Nik Vucevic, And the Hits Just Keep on Coming

Young guys. Talented or potentially talented. Ruled extraneous with the addition of two high-profile, veteran acquisitions at their positions. Acquisitions that have not gone to plan.

The young guys, by the way, are flourishing.

By now, we're all familiar with the tale of Nik Vucevic, whom the Sixers selected 16th overall out of USC in 2011. The 7-foot center played in 51 games in last year's lockout-shortened season for 15 minutes per, scoring 5.5 points and 4.8 rebounds, before appearing in just one playoff game for a grand total of 180 seconds.

He was traded to the Orlando Magic this summer so the Sixers could land Andrew Bynum and is now fifth in the NBA in rebounds per game (11.4) and fourth in rebounds per 48 minutes (16.8). Bynum, of course, has not played a game with the Sixers and possibly never will (cue your outrage at my use of the word possibly).

But now, we're being reminded of Bobrovsky, who was traded to Columbus this summer for a second-round draft pick and two fourth-round choices. Bob carried the load in his rookie season (28-13-8, 2.59, .915) before flaming out down the stretch, giving way to the Flyers' 2011-playoffs goaltending carousel that resulted in Mike Richards and Jeff Carter's exit from Philadelphia and a nine-year, $51 million contract for Ilya Bryzgalov. Made a backup upon Bryz's arrival, the then-23 year old played in 29 games last season, posting a sub-.900 save percentage and was sent out of town when it didn't make sense to have a young kid back up a guy with eight years left on his contract.

Bob's numbers weren't anything to get excited about for the first three weeks of the season, but then he started being quietly good, and now he's impossible to ignore. In his last five games, he's allowed just four goals, posted two shutouts and stopped 124 of 128 shots sent his way. That stretch has dropped his season-long GAA to 2.27 and raised his save percentage to .919.

Bryzgalov is now — and was as soon as the CBA was released — the topic of amnesty speculation. He's currently overworked, looks shaky, has a sub-.900 save percentage, and without improvement could be bought out sometime during the next 18 months.

There is no one on the planet who wouldn't have parted with Vucevic for Bynum.

And so long as the Flyers were committed to Bryzgalov, it didn't make sense to have Bobrovsky on the bench. It's really tough to argue that the club could have gotten any more for him, because he was losing value as a backup with a +3.00 GAA and -.900 save percentage.

To argue that the Sixers or Flyers should have done anything different at the time is to try to look intelligent after the fact.

That said, after the fact, in retrospect, with hindsight being what it is, now that the cards are out on the table, insert euphemism here, the Flyers and Sixers are — at this very moment — on the short end of both trades.

The only way to actually tell for sure, over the long-term, is to come back six months from now, or a year from now, or two years from now, or a decade from now, and check again — when the moment will have past.

Former Eagles linebacker DeMeco Ryans joins 49ers coaching staff

Former Eagles linebacker DeMeco Ryans joins 49ers coaching staff

About a year ago, while in Indianapolis for the combine, the Eagles cut veteran linebacker DeMeco Ryans. 

Ryans has finally found his next job ... as a coach. 

The 32-year-old former linebacker has been named a defensive quality control coach on Kyle Shanahan's staff in San Francisco. Shanahan was on the Texans' staff for the first four years of Ryans' pro career. Niners defensive coordinator Robert Saleh was also on that Houston staff. 

After the Eagles cut him last Feb. 24, Ryans was out of the league in 2016 after 10 NFL seasons. He played the first six years of his career in Houston, where he was a two-time Pro Bowler, before joining the Eagles through a trade in 2012. 

While the Eagles cut Ryans after the 2015 season to save $3.5 million in cap space, they made a point to go out of their way to praise him on his way out. He was very well thought of in the locker room and throughout the building. 

While Ryans played one season under Andy Reid, he quickly became a favorite of Chip Kelly, who frequently called Ryans the "Mufasa" of the Eagles' defense. 

Kelly didn't forget about Ryans when he went to San Francisco to coach the 49ers for the 2016 season. In fact, in Kelly's questionnaire in the NFL's 2016 information guide, Kelly listed Ryans as a player who'd make a great head coach. 

1992 interview between Donald Trump and Randall Cunningham surfaces

1992 interview between Donald Trump and Randall Cunningham surfaces

Philadelphia Magazine's Dan McQuade unearthed a YouTube video of a 1992 interview former Eagles quarterback Randall Cunningham did with real estate tycoon Donald Trump from his short-lived interview special titled Randall Cunningham’s Celebrity Rap.

Apparently, it was a show on WCAU where Cunningham sat down with random celebrities. As McQuade points out, it is pretty weird.

And one of those celebrities just so happened to go on to become president of the United States.

There isn't a whole lot about sports. Trump briefly mentions Randall's career with the Eagles and also discusses Mike Tyson and his rape conviction. Trump appears sympathetic to Tyson's struggles.

Mostly it's a puff piece in which Trump talks somewhat aimlessly from topic to topic. If you don't want to waste 15 minutes watching it, Philly Mag summarized the most bizarre moments