The Sixers Next Owner Makes Great Decisions

The Sixers Next Owner Makes Great Decisions

When rumors started swirling about the Sixers being sold to some billionaire who runs one of the world's largest private equity firms, nobody really knew much about the guy. Was he trying to revive a struggling asset? Is he a corporate raider?

Or is he the next Mark Cuban?

Well, we still don't know, but the Inquirer's Kate Fagan puts together a nice profile of Joshua Harris, despite the Sixers' next owner declining to talk for the piece.

Fagan caught up with old Harvard Business school pals and Penn kids from his days at Wharton, all of whom seem to share the same sentiments. Joshua Harris is a smart dude, incredibly business savvy, and knows how to make great decisions. All qualities that you ostensibly want in an owner of one of your favorite sports teams.

There was one quote, however, from an old pal of Harris' that I found a bit off base, when discussing whether Harris would be using the Sixers as a personal toy.

"I can't see him using this as a toy or a status symbol or some kind of crown jewel to illustrate his success to people or to himself," Stewart said. "He's a serious businessman, and he wants to make it a serious success. Is this a toy? No. There's just no way. . . . The way to be successful in this case in the NBA is to win NBA championships. It's a very definitive and tangible goal. His track record of success would lead you to believe that that's his ambition with the team: not only to win one but win multiple."

Added Stewart: "I think [Dallas Mavericks owner] Mark Cuban treats his team as a toy, and it's his ticket into the glitz and glamour. He's on Entourage, for crying out loud. You're not going to see Josh doing that."

But are you going to see Josh holding the frickin' Larry O'Brien trophy?

The whole profile is worth a read. It's always interesting to get a glimpse of a guy at the top.

>>Those who know him say Joshua Harris, soon-to-be Sixers owner, lives for competition and success [Inquirer]

Steve Mason rediscovers himself in New York just before Flyers return

Steve Mason rediscovers himself in New York just before Flyers return

It had been a while since Steve Mason saw himself.

Walking into the Barclays Center on Sunday, the Flyers’ goalie was 0-6-2 with a 4.03 goals-against average and .844 save percentage over his last 10 appearances (see more recent Flyers numbers and stats).

A far cry from how Mason truly sees himself in net.

But heading into Wednesday’s rivalry clash with the Rangers, Mason will have something to build on, something he couldn’t say since Dec. 21 — the last time he had earned a victory. He’s fresh off his first win in over a month, a gigantic one for Mason considering all the key moments on Sunday the Flyers hope invigorate his confidence.

Without numerous clutch stops from their goalie, the Flyers don’t come back from two goals down to beat the Islanders, 3-2, in overtime. Mason made four saves  — three on four-time All-Star John Tavares — in just over a minute of a third-period power play. The Flyers ended up having to kill two New York man advantages in the final 10 minutes of regulation in order to force overtime.

The extra session is when Mason was just as good, if not better, stoning Tavares on a breakaway attempt that had game-winner written all over it. Mason made four saves in overtime after 13 in the third period.

“I was happy with the way that, personally, this game went for myself,” Mason said Sunday. “It’s been a tough stretch and this is more the type of game that I expect of myself. In recent games, the team was lacking the big saves and tonight it shows what kind of difference it can make.”

It was a massive performance heading into a massive three-game stretch against the Rangers, Maple Leafs and Hurricanes.

“Mase made some huge saves for us,” Simmonds said. “It allowed us to get back in that game.

“It’s not just Mase [with the] ups and downs. Everyone in here has been kind of fighting it and squeezing sticks pretty tight. That one felt good and I think Mase led the charge for sure.”

Mason understands just one game doesn’t turn around a season.

“It’s nice to feel good after a game,” Mason said. “At the same time, whether you’re winning or losing, you have to have a short mindset and get ready for the next one.”

That brings the Flyers to Madison Square Garden Wednesday to face the Rangers, who they’ve lost five straight games to dating back to last season. Mason hasn’t had much luck against New York this season, allowing seven goals in two losses with an .860 save percentage. However, in 2015-16, Mason put up a 1.74 goals-against average and .941 save percentage in five games against the Rangers.

“That’s going to be a tough game going into MSG,” Mason said Tuesday (see story).

The good thing: Mason was in New York two days ago, remembering what he can be.

Manute Bol's 7-foot, 17-year-old son dominates in HS season debut

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Manute Bol's 7-foot, 17-year-old son dominates in HS season debut

Bol Bol, the 17-year-old son of the late Manute Bol, is a top high school basketball prospect with offers from schools like Arizona, Kansas and Creighton. This highlight tape should give you an idea why.
 
Bol, whose father played in the NBA for parts of 12 seasons, including 215 games for the Sixers, now attends the famed Mater Dei High School in California and played in his first game of the season this past weekend. Listed as the No. 16 overall prospect in the 2018 recruiting class by Scout, Bol started his season off with a big 21-point, 10-rebound effort.
 
Take a look at the highlight tape from the 6-foot-11 Bol and expect to see him carry on his father’s legacy on the court at a major NCAA college basketball program soon.